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January 23, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAVTP STX

THE MICHIGAN

D.A T I y
L-

FRTIDA.Y, JANUARY 23, 1931.

PAES.TII IHCA'. ) TNFIAY AURY2,13

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lverine a
IVE ITlYLFFTi VARSITY GOALIE
ST 0MG OPPOSITION'

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Conference

Win

LETTERMEN OF EASTERN COLLEGES
DENY OVER-EIPHASISOF FOOTBALL
Over-emphasis upon the most vard did report some dissatisfaction
popular colIegiate sport in America, with the proninence of the coaches'
thy football classic, which subject participation in the game, with the

MAT ACE HURT ICHIGNTLESREADY TO FACE
3P"aA KENE RKS

Winner of Series May Challenge
Wiscontsin's Position as
League Leader.
With its chances of making the
race for Conference hockey honors
a close one depending upon the out-
come of tonight's and tomorrow's
games, the Michigan puck team
will invade Minneapolis tonight to
battle Minnesota, traditional rivals
of many years standing, who are
also depending upon the results
of the two Michigan battles to keep
them in the running for the title.
Both Seek Win.
Although neither of the sextets
has yet won a"Conference game,
both of them are-strong enough to
make the winner of these setoes al
dangerous opponent to the league
leading Wisconsin club, who al-
ready have three games chalked up
on the right side of the ledger.
Michigan has dropped two clashes
to the Badgers, while Minnesota
also lost to Coach "Spike" Carl-
son's team in the only game play-
ed as yet between the two clubs.
This series will mark the Wolver-
ine's last appearance on a Confer-
ference rink other than the Colise-
um this year, as all of the remain-
der of Michigan's games will be a
played in Ann Arbor with the ex-
ception of a single clash at East
Lansing against Michigan State
next Tuesday.
Nine men made the trip to Min-
neapolis and it appearsmore than
likely that the same combination
that has started for the Wolverines
all year will be on the ice again to-
night when the opening whistle
sounds. Stationed at the defense
posts in front of goalie Jack Tomp-
kins will be Bill Williams and Tom
Prouse, - while wings Enmy Reid
and Tommy Courtis will team with
center Keith Crossman to form the
forward trio. Captain Art Schland-
erer, Harold Sindles, and Charles
Hildner will constitute the Michi-
gan reserve squad, and each of
them will undoubtedly see plenty
of service while the regulars get
a chance to rest.
Gophers Strong.
As to the personnel of the Min-
nesota squad, little or nothing is
known, but the team's record shows
it to be a worthy opponent for the
Maize and Blue, in spite of early
(Continued on Fage 7)

has recently been the topic of a n.-j
tion wide controversy, was denied
by a group of 114 varsity lettermen
of Eastern colleges in answer to a
questionnaire which was sent to
these representatives of eight in-
stitutions under the-auspices of the
Dai Lmouth daily student publica-
Lion.
The questionnaire contained a-'
bout all the points brought up in
the recent controversy, but few of
them were considered of much im-
portance by the lettermen.j

greatest coming from Princeton,
Dartmouth, New York University
and Williams. They claimed that
the coaches took too active a part
in the actual playing of the gtame
Ninety-four of the 114 vote lav-
ored the coaches, however.
Actual enjoyment of the game by
the players appeared in the nega-
tive in five out of the 11 Dartmouthj
votes. Four of Princetc:' 2, and
five of William's eight pla -rs also
said that they did not enjoy the
game. Yale and New York were

Auer May Not be Able to Fight
Until Season's Last Bouts;
Parkes Also Injured.
Taking' another set -back from,
Dame Fortune in the matter of
losing two men in the face of the
meet with the Spartans next
Saturday, the Wolverine matmen
nevertheless went through a stren-
uous drill last night and are con-
fident that they will not have any
trouble with the grapplers from ul-
state.
Auer is out for a time that may
string out until the end of the sea-
son with his injured arm, and
though it shows signs of impro ;e-
ment he may not be able to go to
the mat before the last bouts on
the schedule. Parker, the flashy
little 155-pounder who showed so

much promise in his first fight
against West Virginia, wrenched his
shoulder Tuesday in the practice
session and he is reported unfit for
the bout with the Spartans.
These tough breaks coming when
they did just before the last pre-
conference meet, when every man
on the squad needed the extra
training under fire before the team
started after the Big Ten title, nay
shift the lineup a good doal, but
Keen's grapplers should not have
much trouble in flooring the team
from Michigan State.
Otto, one of the regulars who has
been out with an injury most of
the season, will again be in the ring
at 126 pounds Saturday and he is
welcomed as the one good break
that the Wolves have had. No air
(Continued on Page 7)

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Jack Tompkins,
Veteran goalie of the Michigan
hockey team that plays Minnesota
at Minneapolis tonight. Tompkins
was selected last year as one of
the best college net minders in the
ranks of United States puck teams.
'PIGGY' LAMBERT
PUT ON SICK LIST
Mastoid Infection Forces Coach
to Drno Duties at Present.

11
Bi
ha
th
Co
da
en
gy
hi
in '

All the institutions excet Har- unanimously for the affirmative
side of this issue with Cornell and
Harvard having but one negative
E3 vote each.
IObjectionsto early season "set-
ups," were voiced at most every oneI
[R of the colleges although only a few
favored the reducing of the sched-
IOule to four or five games.
- Some of the individual ideas voic-
lolverines and Michigan State ed at the several institutions about
Normal Group Held Joint
Practice Wednesday. ..New York University-The sched-
ule should end Thanksgiving Day,
Varsity gymnasts under coach or near that day, eliminating all
ll West are working long and post-season games.
rd these days in preparation for
e opening meet of the Western Harvard-Would r a t h e r have
nference scheduled on next Fri- football practice start two weeks
y, with Ohio State as the oppon- before school opens, to give the
ts. (Continued on Page -)
Wednesday night a group of -
mnasts from Michigan State Nor- INDIANS MAY GET
al College visited Coach West and KAMM FROM SOX'
s squad and held a jomint practice.

Orville Parker,
Wolverine grappler in the 155-
pound class, who will probably be
kept out of the Spartan meet Sat-
urday because of an injury re-
ceived during practice.
Many Seek Assistant's
Job Under Bill Ingram
(Rv Asoiate' 'Prevs)
CHICAGO, Jan. 22.-"Navy Bill"
Ingram reports a bull market
among football coaches.
The new University of California
head coach came to Chicago from
the quiet of Jeffersonville, Ind., to
get a rest from the labor of open-
ing telegrams and letters and an-
swerin; long distance telephone
cals.

1

which several details were work-

4

. ed out to the benefit of both teams.
The men from Ypsilanti proved
Purdue's basketball team, the de- strong in tumbling, the department
fender of the Big Ten Conference in which the Michigan men have
championship, suffered a casualty been the weakest, and at the same
yesterday that was unusual as well time were weak on the apparatus,
as heavy. The coach himself was a strong point of the Michigan
put out of action after several days squad.
of trying to carry Tonight Coach West expects to
on in spite of the hold a meet among the expebrs
growing pain in of his own team, thenrimar
his ear. y u
Co ar.r pc.e of which is to a niliai ize his
Coach W1( a r d, inexlperienced squad w i t h the
"Piggy" Lambert jethod of judgig which will be
w as rem oved to a pd tere c m e s
Lafayette hospit- t n o et
~cil i~e, anInL'mu Pal a ssistant
al for treatment
...for:teatment, will assist in judging.
of a mastoid in-
fection. He has C This is the first year in which
been bothered for !ichigan has had an intercollegi-
some days now ate team while the othtc. Confer-
and he had the C i c e schools h.ve participated
eardrum lanced yearly since 1905, so too much can
' WARD 'iG Yto help relieve the not be expected from the squa(n
roub his yr.
."arfln . r autt h .

Fonseca Likely to be Traded for
Windy City Star.
(P> Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Jan. 22.-Reports that
the White Sox would trade Third
Baseman Willie Kamm to the
Cleveland Indians for First Base-
man Lew Fonseca, American league
batting champion in 1929, grew to-
day.
The rCeea e by the White Sox of
"Bud" hn; re gular first base-
{'avn, to Tupy City of the Interna-
clonal lea,-_uipsJ1,7TeclI utheIrepot,.
whi to>S1a ''r >ft with *-
rK<uiar al IteC oiig (arC-t'130'sibly
Johnny Watwood, who alternated
between ,frst, and t itoLiiArlea'
year.
Kamin was purchas;d by the I
Whit Sox2 f'om San Francisco of
tne Paciic Coas league in ti2t
fm, cash and players reported to
dzio1;t )C )f0Ff )riniort.

ANCIENT DARNING BASKET
In general use until the invention of
Buffer Heel and Toe. Now seen
only in the homes of women who
haven't yet caught on.
inker & ompany

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South State at Williams

Ann Arbor, Michigan

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'lip ---_ ____ _.--_------ -- - _ --__ --- ----_ _. _ __ .._______.___-- . -- - .VIII

I eepy. if m P" Cf m

" he Down I own Store for Michigan Men"
that will enable you to buy new fall merchandise at
great savings. To reduce the size of our stock before
inventory time. We have slashed our prices, having no
regard to the cost of this fine merchandise.

FINE SHIRTS
We are offering a group of
fine colored shirts, tailored
with collars and neckband
shirts with a pointed and
round collar to match.
$1.69
3 for $5.00

NECKWEAR
A group of fine silk neck-
wear, that has a heavy wool
lining was purchased by our
New York office at a very
low price. We are able to
pass this bargain on to our
customers at
95c
3 for $2.75
HOSIERY
All our wool hose, includ-
ing plain colors, patterns,
clock effects that sold from
$1.00 to $2.50 we have
placed in two price groups.

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$°n:
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S',, " .
. v:
:',",
' :,'v3
i y
: :
:E
.: T
x.AS
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aff.
i

GLOVES
We have a few pairs of fine
deer-skin and bu ck- s k i n
gloves, that were purchased
to sell at $4.00 to $5.00.
We are offering at
1 Offf
$2.00 and $2.50

i

Starting today we have a special
group of thirty overcoats, all long.
Single breasted, dark blue, and
dark grey colors.
Prices formerly $35 to $45
--M.
pU3

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FULL SHRUNK
Broadcloth
Shirts

3 for $4.50
-Until this Season, $1.95
Better in Quality-Lower ;n Price
These shirts are cut and tailored according to the usual
Wild & Company specification. Perfect in fit and style.
Collar attached.
Every shirt is unconditionally guaranteed and will be re-
placed with another shirt unless entirely satisfactory.
'^ , . ,~ ~

69c
' for $2.00

95c
3 for $2.75

SWEATERS
A group of plain colors and patterned effects in slip-over
and coat styles that offer great savings to you.
$2.85 and $3.95

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