100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 22, 1931 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

rT-TTTV -QnA r TAKTTTAOX' hn innt' '

DAT T.u KS

WTVC~~AY J7YANUTTAY 22,fl( 1931A

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the
President until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a. m. Saturday.

RABBI HELLER DISCUSSES ATHEISM, f[ IFrederick Crowther
HUMANIST MOVEMENT IN NEW idiii ! Lito hVb r int tI lmt

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1931

NO. 85

NOTICES
University Loan Committee will meet on Monday, January 26, at
1:30 p. in., in room 2, University hail.
Students who have filed applications with the Office of the Dean
of Students should call at that office for an appointment with the
Committee. J. A. Bursley, chairman.
To Department Heads and Others Concerned: The hourly time slips
must be in the Business Office not later than noon of January 24, to be
included in the January 31 payroll. Edna M. Geiger, payroll clerk.
Pre-Medical Students: Attention is called to the fact that Friday,
January 23, is the last day for registration for application to take the
Aptitude Test. As was announced earlier, this test should be taken by
all students who wish to apply for entrance in September, 1931, to a
medical school in the United States and Canada. Application for taking
this test should be made at the Registrar's Office, room 4, University
hall. Ira M. Smith, registrar.
New Transportation Curriculum: Students interested in this cur-
riculum, particularly Freshmen and Sophomores, should see Professor
John S. Worley at 1026 E. Engineering building, that they may plan
their courses for the coming semester. L. M. Gram.
Students, Colleges of Engineering and Architecture: Students in
these colleges who are taking courses other than Chemistry and Physics
In the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts are requested to call
at the Secretary's office, 263 West Engineering building, to give the
names of their instructors in those courses in order that they may
receive, their grades promptly at the close of the semester.
Louis A. Hopkins, secretary.
German 86-Scientific (Medical): This course will be given next
semester.
Engineers: Students desiring to change their course or to transfer
to other colleges should make such application to this office between
January 26 and 30. A. H. Lovell, assistant dean.
Literary College and School of Music, February Seniors: All students3
completing the requirements for degrees at the close of the present
semester should pay their diploma fees by February 13. Blanks may
be secured at the Registrar's Office, room 4, University hall.
Chemieal Engineers: The announced A. I. Ch. E. meeting for Jan.
2, has been postponed to enable the members to hear Prof. James R.
Withrow, head of the Chemical Engineering Dept., of Ohio State Uni-
versity. He will speak under the auspices of the University and the local
section of the American Chemical Society at 4:15 p. in., Jan. 22, in room
151 Chemistry building.
Men students who are interested in camp work for the coming
summer are asked to report at Lane hall.
Rebound Reviews: All students in Play Production courses are re-
quired to attend performances and to hand in critical reviews next
Monday.
EVENTS TODAYI
University and American Chemical Society Lecture: A lecture by
Professor James R. Withrow, head of. the Department of Chemical En-
gineering of the Ohio State University, will be given at 4:15 p. in., in
room 165 Chemistry building. The topic of the talk will be: "Problems
of the Lime Industry." The meeting will be open to the public.
Colloquium in Applied Mechanics meets in room 445 West Engineer-
ing building, at 7:30 p. m. There will be a periodical review by Mr. 0.
W. Boston, Head of Engineering Shops.
Mr. Jakkula will present a paper on "Welded Beam Connections."
Senior Education Class will meet at the Michigan League building,
at 7:30 p. m., room assignment to be found on the bulletin board.
French I Tutoring will be furnished free by the S. C. A., at 7:30 p.
in., In Lane hall auditorium. Group will be limited to twenty-five and
reservations should be made in advance at Lane hall.

Criticizes H. L. Menkin in The humanist postulates his beliefs on
Modernists Revolt a religion of some sort and is there-
Against God.' fore unimportant as an argument
in favor of atheism. He discourses
By Jerry E. Rosenthal, '33. on this subject, with the aid of
Criticism of H. L. Mencken and references gathered from humanist
"Mercurianity" is the feature of works, to a great extent.
Rabbi Bernard Heller's latest essay, The third and last part of the
"The Modernists Revolt Against; essay is one which is expected to
God" which has just recently been cause the greatest amount of con-
released for publication. In the troversy. Here he gives his own
work, he also discusses the human- opinions on atheism, humanism
ist movement in religion and athe- and, what is more important to the
ism and atheists who venture to reader, his ideas on the remedies
make their views known to the for the evil of atheism which he
world. says has become not just a passive
The essay is divided into three philosophy but one which has tak-
parts, the first of which is given en an active offensive.
over entirely to answering Menc- His third part, which apparently
ken's opinions on religion which differs not a great deal from many
appeared in his "Treatise on the other similar works by clergymen,
Gods." Here Heller correctly anal- is one which is open to argument,
yzes Mencken's attitude towards re- for in it he denounces the idea of
ligion as something which has im- teaching a belief in God through
pededthe rise of the superman deduction.
and something which has been bred
into man through fear. Heller Friday, Feb. 13, Named
counters these suppositions with his
own and others' works which show for V o t e on Recall
a belief in a divine being through
pure philosophy and quotes fre- (13v Associated Press)
quently from such modernists as DETROIT, Jan. 21.-Defying all i
Havelock Ellis and William James rules of superstitution, City Clerk
for his proofs. Michael J. Grajewskijr., of Ham-

Outlines Anthropological History
of Human Race; Stresses
Recent Discoveries.
Today it is a matter of common
knowledge that the earth on which
we live is millions and millions of
years old," stated Prof. Leslie A.
White of the anthropology depart-
ment in his second lecture of the
year from the University broadcast-
ing studio. In his talk he briefly
presented the history of fossil man
and his -relation to modern man,
and also indicated the relatively
recent scope of fossil study by cit-
ing many popular beliefs that ek-
isted less than fifty years ago.
"The accepted belief in Europe
and America not many years ago
was that the earth had been creat-
ed in the year 4004 B. C. and that
man and all the plants and ani-
mals had been created at that
time."
He went on to say, however, that
"the geologists of the early nine-
teenth century proved quite con-
clusively that the world was an-
cient millions of years before the
time of Moses."
According to Professor White,
the missing link which would defi-
nitely connect man and ape to a
common ancestor has not been
found, but that many specimens
have been discovered which have
striking characteristics common to
both. "It is quite likely, I feel sure,"
he continued, "that many discov-
eries of great importance will be
made within the next ten or twen-
ty years. We may even be so bold
as to look forward to the time when
we will possess a complete fossil
record of man's decent from a
primitive ape-like ancestor."

Frederick Crowther, well-known
artist, will exhibit several examples
of paintings of residential and
other buildings rendered in water
colors all this week and next in the
exhibitionroom of the Architect-
ural building. Also included in the
exhibition are two pen and ink
sketches by Henry P. Kirby and a
water color by Hughson Hawley.
All three of the artists are known
for their work in the field of archi-
tecture. Crowther has exhibited
many of his works, before while
Kirby is known among the leading
architectural schools as one of the
most imaginative designers of the
period. Hawley has always been
recognized as one of the leaders in
the field of water colors.
The two sketches by Kirby are
of a cathedral and "A House and
Windows." The two have received
considerable attention in other ex-
hibits. The drawing of a cathedral
scene by Hawley- is one: of his best
works having been shown in many
architectural exhibits since 1910.
The exhibition room is on the
third floor of the building and is
open to the public every day.
Hootkins Will Tutor
Freshmen in French
Hirsch Hootkins, instructor in
French, will direct the tutoring sec-
tion in beginning French for all
freshmen, at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
Lane hall. Tutoring sections for
other courses will be held at 7:30
o'clock every night this week under
the auspices of the Student Chris-
tian association. Freshmen who
desire to be tutored must register
at Lane hall.

ON ORIGIN Of MAN..

and Ink Sketch

Igs
ins

i

In the second part, Heler dis- tramek Tuesday set Friday, Feb. 13,
cusses the humanist movement and ! for the special election at which
here also makes ample use of the citizens of the suburb will vote on
footnote. His basis of argument in the recall of Mayor Rudolph G.
this section of the essay is that the Tenerowicz.
Studio Art Club: There will be a studio class in life sketching this
evening at 8:00 in the studios of the Architectural building. Mr. Valerio
will be the critic. All interested in this type of drawing are welcome.
French Circle: Business meeting at 4:15, in the Circle Meeting room.
Two new officers will be elected.
Polonia Literary Circle: Business-social meeting tonight, at 7:30,
in lounge 1 of the Women's League.
Dr. Francis Onderdonk will address Alpha Alpha Gamma on "Mod-
ern Architecture" at 7:30 p. m., in room 102 Architectural building. The'
public is cordially invited.
Zeta Phi Eta: Frances Johnson will be in the Grand Rapids room
of the League from 2 until 4 o'clock today and tomorrow to receive
money for the tickets to the dance. On Friday she will have the proofs
for the Zeta Phi Eta picture so that girls may call there to see them.
Varsity Glee Club: Regular meeting tonight as usual.
Freshman Girls' Glee Club: Important business meeting of the club,
at 7:30 in the committee room of the League. Compulsory attendance.
Board of Directors of the Faculty Women's Club meets at 1 o'clock
at the Michigan League.
Newcomers' Section, Faculty Women's Club: Meeting at Palmer
Field House, at 2:30 o'clock. All newcomers are urged to be present, as
social plans have been made for the day.
Sigma Delta Chi: 'Ensian picture will be taken at Dey's Thursday
afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Gurney Williams.
COMING EVENTS
Chemistry 5E Tutoring: Tutoring in Chem. 5E, will be furnished
Friday evening by the S. C. A., in Lane hall auditorium at 7:30.
Alpha Epsilon Mu initiation and banquet postponed until Wednes-
day, January 28, at same place and time.
The Philippine-Michigan Club:- There will be a meeting on Sunday,
January 25, at 3;30 p. m., in Lane hall. Questions of vital importance
will be discussed and considered. All Filipinos are urged to attend.
S. I. Cabanatan.

T
.
s
k
Y
e
r
t
a
v
r

3001000 WORKMEN
BUILD10NEW ROS
IN UNITED STTS
Louisiana Plans Most Extensive
Constructive Program;
to Employ 12,000.
TO AID UNEMPLOYMENT
Six States Give No Estimate
as Road Expenditures
Are Considered .
(By Associated Press)
New roads long enough to circle
the globe will criss-cross America
beneath the straining muscle of
some 300,000 workmen this year at
a cost of not far short of a billion
dollars.
Reports compiled today show
that upward of 9,000 miles of the
approximate 25,000-mile total will
be hard-surfaced. This is exclusive
of 11-states in which the highway
commissions could make no mile-
age estimates.
The actual cost estimates, not in-
cluding six states in which road
programs still are under legislative
consideration and taking no ac-
count of independent county high-
way construction, is $816,048,923, of
which the federal government will
contribute $293,500,000.
Estimate is Conservative.
The estimate of workmen to
benefit in the program is perforce
conservative, since a total of nine
states have no definite figures on
this particular item.
The six states unable at this
time to forecast any figures are
Arizona, Vermont, Tennessee, Mas-
sachusetts, Ohio and New Mexico.
Tennessee expects to match its
federal allocation of $4,400,000,
however, and the governor of
Massachusetts has proposed a bond
issue of $10,000,000.
Louisiana stands out as the most
ambitious state of the year in its
program of 2,500 miles of pavement
and 1,000 miles of gravel, with con-
templated expenditure of $75,000,-
000 and employment of approxi-
mately 12,000 men.
Pennsylvania Second.
Pennsylvania is second in planned
expenditure of $60,000,000,, but by
far the leading contributor to em-
ployment in the contemplated use
of 50,000 workmen on 1,400 miles
of new roadway.
Should California use half of its
budget for the biennium in 1931 it
will spend $55,191,500. This state
has several legislative wrinklesato
iron out, though, before a definite
program can be announced.
Phone 2-2551
UNITED CABS
"Quick, Efficient, Service"

CEME TER Y CARETAKER LOSES SLEEP
WHEN NEOPHYTES ROAM AMONG DEAD
A NG_____ DEAD --~--~

Labor
by.

Saving Device Employed
Pledges Not Approved
by Witcher.

By Frank B. Gilbreth, '33.
The population of Ann Arbor's
city of the deadrForest Hills, is
rudely disturbed from its quiet for
a brief interval once each year. In
the spring, when freshmen are un-
dergoing the rigors of fraternity
"hell week," many squads of neo-
phytes must uphold an ancient
tradition, that of proving their
bravery in a grave yard.
This practice is no doubt harm-
less as far as the silent population
of the city is concerned but to C.
H. Witcher, caretaker of the ceme-
tery, it means a week of sleepless
nights.
Many and varied are the missions
upon which freshmen are dis-
patched. The most common of
these, Witcher stated, is that of
finding some obscure grave which

can only be identified by theI
inscription on the stone. The pledge'
must copy the name 'and the date
of the death of the deceased and
return to present 'it to the active
members of the fraternity that he
intends to join.
Of late years however, he con-
tinued, the freshmen, evidently be-
coming familiar with this popular
means of hazing, have attempted
to find a method of discovering the
graves without actually having ~Tio
wander among the dead. They sim-
ply ring the door bell of Witcher's
house and,rafter arousing him, ask
to see the records of the cemetery.
It is this labor-saving device that
is causing him to lose his sleep dur-
ing "hell week."
One of the favorite stones that
fraternities seem to prefer to have
identified by their men is one on
which a base relief has been chis-
eled, depicting the manner in which
the deceased lost his life.

1I'-'

Faculty Rifle Shoot: There will be a Faculty Rifle Shoot tonight
7:30. All Faculty members interested are cordially invited.

WILL DURANT

at

I

VAN LOON-STORY OF MANKIND....
Other good titles in this edition are:-
HALLIBURTON-Royal Road to Romance.
BENVENUTO CELLINI-Autobiography
DURANT-Transition .................. .
DURANT-Story of Philosophy ...........
ADLER-Understanding Human Nature... .
ANTHONY-Catherine the Great .....
W9A

$1.00
$1.00
$1.00
. .$1.00
.. $1.00
. . $1.00
$1.00
iniversity
Bookstore

Bowling Tournament and Rifle
Ezlhibit: There will be an inter-
class bowling tournament and rifle
exhibit at the Women's Athletic
,bUhding tonight from 7 to 9. The
usual mixed bowling classes will
not be able to use the alley, but
are cordially invited to attend.

FAMOUS AUTHOR

-d

Suits Pressed
30c
ALTERATIONS AT COST
CHAS. DOUKAS
1309 South University

I

SPEAKS AT HILL AUDITORIUM
TONIGHT 8 P. M.
Auspices Hindustan Club of U. of M. Tickets 50 Cents

I

P mmmwq

I 1,__ _ __ _ __ ____

R ,.

PLAY PRODUCTION OFFEKS THE HIGH SOCIETY COME

DY

BY DONALD OGDEN STEWART,

,}

"REDBO
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

N D'

SEATS

To-Night,

Tomorrow

Niglst,

Saturday

BOX OFFICE
PHONE 6300

CURTAIN AT 8:15 O'CLOCK

I I

-- _ _ _

REFRESHMENT SERVICE
ON SECOND FLOOR

DANCE

WITH
I dup

5R

NEW LOUNGING SPACE
RADIO

AMW-MM

!'

- - - - - - - ~

, S ..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan