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January 21, 1931 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-21

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WEDNESDAY, :AN'UARY 21, 1931

i tTHE x MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDN~E$DAY, 3ANUARY 21, 1931~rH~ MY~HIGAN DAILY

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D-ELEGATE REPORTS'
RESULTS OF SIXTH
N.iS. F.A MEETING'
Katherine Koch, '32, Serves as
Representative in Annual
Event.
DISCUSS VITAL TOPICS
Problems of Tariff, Prohibition,

Reparations,

Considered

by Congress.
(Editor's Note: This is the first of
a series of three articles to appear
on the N. S. F. A. Convention).
In a report of the progress made
at the sixth annual congress of the1
National Students' Federation of
America which was held Dec. 29
to Jan. 2 at Atlanta, Georgia, Kath-
erine Koch, '32, Michigan delegate,
stated that the purpose of the con-
verition was "an adventure in prac-
tical idealism." More than 250 rep-
resentatives of schools from all
over the country gathered to dis-
cuss problems of student self-gov-
ernment, and to formulate methods
for fostering intelligent student
opinion on national and interna-
tional affairs.
Georgia Institute of Technology
sponsored the convention this year,
and was host to the men delegates.
The women were accommodated at
the Agnes Scott College at Decatur,
a few miles from Atlanta, where
the sessions were held at the Bilt-
more hotel.
Discuss Tariff Issue.
Discussion this year centered on
the tariff, as a problem of particu-
lar significance at the present time.
The first morning of the conven-
tion, Norman Thomas addressed
tle members through the medium
of the radio, and presented the So-
cialist viewpoint of the taritf ques-
tion.
At the Plenary session, held the
first day, a committee on student
opinion was formed to consider na-
tional questions of importance, and
to present resolutions on these
matters to the Congress as a whole.
This committee represented geo-
graphical division of the country,
and Miss Koch was chosen as a
representative.1
Formulate Questions.
After a long session, it was de-
cided that the individual members
formulate a series of questions of
national issues for discussion in
Congress. Such vital matters as
Unemployment Insurance, Prohi-
bition, Reparations, and Recogni-
tion of Soviet Russia were present-
ed, and much heated debate was
precipitated. The general concen-
sus of opinion in the conventioni
reflected the general standpointsI

Sorority Functions
Include Patroness
and Faculty Events
In spite of the imminence of ex-
aminations, the sororities continue
to be very active socially, especially
with faculty and patroness dinners. i
Kappa Kappa Gamma are honor-
ing their patronesses withta dinner
tonight. The guests are to be Mr.
and Mrs. O. E. Hunt, Mr. and Mrs.
A. S. Whitney, Dr. and Mrs. John
Sundwall, Dr. Margaret Bell, andl
Mrs. Bell.
Delta Zeta gave a formal faculty
dinner last night in honor of the
following members of the faculty:
Prof. S. E. Gingerich, and Mrs. Gin-
gerich, Dean Wilbur R. Humphreys
and Mrs. Humphreys, Prof. John L.
Brumm and Mrs. Brumm, Mr. and
Mrs. Wesley H. Maurer, and Mr. and
Mrs. Donal H. Haines. Last Sunday
night the members of Delta Zeta
went on a sleighride, returning to
the house for a buffet supper after-
wards.
Delta Gamma are entertaining
the following members of the fac-
ulty at a formal dinner tonight:
Dean John R. Effinger and Mrs.
Effinger, Prof. Ralph Aigler and
Mrs. Aigler, Dean Alice Lloyd, MissI
Jean Ette Perry, Mrs. Byrl Fox
Bacher, and Miss Ethel McCormick.
Jnt-ramura
..NEWS
.I I.

MRS. LILA PARGMENT ADVOCATES
HOBBIES OF READING AND SKATINGIj
Instructor Finds Both Pastimes social questions and conditions as'TO
Equally Interesting for well as psychological studies ofC U UI icL., Lf L2a
Spare Moments. character-qualities which she par-
C ,ticularly admires in Thomas Hardy King' Daughters of Wy
By C. M., '33.-and John Galsworthy, her favorite ° County to Hold Elections,
It is very seldom that a person English authors.
is born who has so unusual a char- "I like modern books," she said, HaRp s
acter as to be passionately fond of because they are realistic, but most More than 100 members of the
two diversions which are as wide of all I like the great Russian works. King's Daughters of Washtcena
apart as the proverbial poles. But Always Russian literature has been
this is just exactly the situation realistic, and modern books are just county are expected to attend t, :

i

with Mrs. Lila Pargment, instructor
in the French and Russian litera-
turedepartments: she likes to do
nothing better than read and ice
skate.
She spends every spare moment
she can pursuing these occupations,
and, as she naively admitted, "I,
often take time when I should be
doing something else to finish a
chapter in a bock or rush off to the
Coliseum to skate for an hour or
two and have such a splendid time
I don't come back when I know I
should."
All her life Mrs. Pargment has
liked to read. When she was very
young she was like all children, for
she read all the fairy stories she
could possibly find. As she grew
older her taste developed and she
graduated to travel stories and
books of natural history.
Now, as her favorite authors she
ranks Dostoiesvsky first, Tolstoi a
close second, and Gorki third. P.
Romanov is her favorite of the con-
temporary authors of today. Mrs.
Pargment is particularly interested
in these authors because they treat

coming under that influence."
And now as a direct contrast to
love of reading Mrs.Pargment smiled
and said, "But now, I have another
little hobby which I practice when-
ever I have the opportunity-skat-
ing. When I was very young in
Russia I skated all the time. Later,
when I was living in Paris I didn't
have much opportunity. But now,
here in Ann Arbor, I skate all the
time I possibly can. I really prefer
outside skating, but you can't al-
ways depend on the weather." And
Mrs. Pargment is a real person who
really likes to do these things which,
seem to be so characteristic of dif-
ferent types of character.
Dr. Clarence Thorpe
Gives Talk on Keats
at Nurses' Residence
Dr. Clarence D. Thorpe, professor
of English, spoke to the residents
of Couzens hall about Keats during
their poetry hour last Sunday eve-
ning. Next Sunday, Montgomery A.
Butchart, Instructor of English, will
talk on four English novelists:
Swinburn, Cummings, Eliott, and
Hardy, dealing particularly with
Swinburn.
Janet O'Neill, '31SN, is in charge
of the benefit bridge which the
Senior class at Couzens hall is giv-
ing on the evening of January 29
to raise money for the Shirley C.
Titus scholarship fund.
This fund was started by the,
class of '30 to found a scholarship
for graduate work in nursing.
e!

annual convention of the hat
which opens at 9 o'clock tomorrow
morning in the League M rs. Cocl-
rad George, jr., president, will l}{-
side.
Reports of circles, officers, ard
elections of officers; moving pi-
tures of the children's school in
University hospital, which is Main~
tained by the King's Daughters, and
an address by Robert A. Campbel,
University treasurer, will concludu
the morning session.
Greetings by visiting members, a
play, "The Original Ten," and an
address by Mrs. Fred Fisher, are
features on the afternoon progra.
In the evening, members of tie
state board will be the dinne-2
guests of the chapter.

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including

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Games Today.
4:00-Kappa Delta vs. League 7.
5:00-League 2 vs. Xi Omega.
Alpha Xi Delta vs. JordanI
S.2.
8:00-Jordan 1 vs. Couzens Hall.
Scores of Tuesday's Games.
Sigma Kappa 24, Adelia Cheever 11.
Although not a particularly fast
game it was much harder fought
than the score would indicate. Sig-
ma Kappa's advantage lay in hav-
ing two very tall forwards: Mar-
garet Stahl and Helen Moore. Ger-
aldine Huff forward for Adelia
Cheever also did exceptional play-
ing.
Kappa Kappa Gamma 1$, Alpha
Omicron Pi 12.
Both of these teams had very
1 good forwards, and the game was
fast. Kappa Kappa Gamma led by
invariably getting the tap-off. An-
nette Cummings was Kappa Kappa
Gamma's star, and Albertina Mas-
len was Alpha Omicron Pi's leading
performer.
of national opinion, for the dele-
gates' ideas were colored by local
viewpoints. Discussion of the sub-
sidation of athletics was postponed
for later consideration.

Instruction in Bridge
Is Given by Y.W.C.A.
Mrs. R. B. Finley will instruct the
bridge class which is being spon-
sored by the Y. W. C. A. Quite a
number of women have signed up
for this class which proved success-
ful as an experiment last semester.
The instruction will be given every
Wednesday night from 7 to eight
o'clock at the Y. W. C. A.

ATTENTION
Mosher Jordan
Girls
Lodge Beauty Salon in
Observatory Lodge Apts.
now under
MICHIGAN BEAUTY
SHOPPE
MANAGEMENT
For Appointments and
opening prices
DIAL 22147

Extraordinary
V'alues!
Buttons.............$1.69
Slide fasteners .......$2.19

All
Sales
Final

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Touches of Color
on Straw Bodies
The spirit of Spring Hats is ex-
pressible in fresh vivid colorings
A crisp, piquant, feather or perky
ribbon-and a fine straw body. The
breath of the new year and the new
season in every one of our models-
and time spent in seeing them will be
well rewarded--WhIv not come in
Jacobson's

SpringFormal

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Shop of Personal Service

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11

CLEARANCE
of
Peacock and Matrix.
Footwear
Values from $10.50 to $14.50

<r.~

Coat

Special

WEDNESDAY

20 Coats

$8.95

$5 85
Black Kid
Black Patent
Black Fabrics
Brown Kid
Brown and Black
Genuine Lizard
Blue Kid

PUMPS
TIES
STRAPS
$ 85

Chinchillas, Tweeds, Broadcloths
Sizes 12-20
Values to $29.75
25 Coats - $15.00
Bouelays, Alpaca Curls, Tweeds
Broadcloths
Sizes 14-38
Values to $39.50

MEZZANINE

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