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October 05, 1930 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-05

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SUNDAYOCTEOBER 5, 1930

T H E MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE FIVE

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VAMUNWA"A Xq
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CflRfDITIf [VUIBIT NEW RESIDENTS
UIIUIIOF DORMITORIES
ARE ENTERTAINED
Margaret Berz, '27, Is Speaker
at Martha Cook Initiation
Held m Blue Room.

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CAROLA GOYA FEELS FREER AND
MORE TRULY HERSELF ON STAGE
A charmingly demure Miss Car- a different manner. A Spanish au-
ola Goya, far different in personal- dience acts with you and their ap-
ity from the alluring and exotic plause and approval are felt
Spanish dancer I was prepared to throughout the performance, rath-
meet, said she almost preferred to I er than coming after a number is
have people see her dance before finished as in America."
talking to her, as she confessed, "I Miss Goya spoke .in precise Eng-
feel freer and more truly myself lish, . with a scarcely noticeable
on the stage than at any other Spanish accent. In fact the only
time. People always say I am dif- indication of her nationality were
ferent then, too." her lovely, very dark eyes and black
It i n+ th tthi th hair Her actions and dress be-

New Motifs Feature Decorative
Schemes Carried Out
at Parties.
INITIATIONS TAKE PLACE
Alumnae Are Guests at Chapter
Houses During Past
Week.
Unusual ingenuity and careful
planning mark the. various rush-
ing teas, dinners, luncheons, and
breakfasts of the sororities. A
southern dinner given by one sor-
ority provided both the atmosphere
and the food one would expect to
find in an old southern plantation
house. Miniature bales of cotton
and palm trees, and Spanish moss
lent realistic touches to the -decor-
ations.
One of the Houses entertained
Wednesday night with a circus din-
ner. A small circus ring was plac-
ed in the middle of the table and
filled with animals of every sort.
Small colored clowns were used for
place cards. The ring master an-
nounced the serving of dinner.
Saturday night another organi-
zation introduced a novel dinner
in the form of a race track enter-
tainment. Southern costumes were
used, and various other ideas re-
lating to a Kentucky Derby were
instituted.
Luncheon at another house took
the form of a travel meal. Guests
progressed from one table to an-
other,each table representing a
different country and decorated
according to its nationality. A
lovely affair at the same house was
an Oriental dinner, which is an
annual event during rushing. Ty-
pical oriental tables were used, with
the diners seated on the floor,
eating with chop-sticks. The or-
iental idea was carried out in food
and decorations in all details.
Out-of-town alumnae at the Sig-'
ma Kappa house this week are Mrs.
Claire Reck, Detroit; Miss Lydia
Baird, Detroit; Miss Murine Jones,
Flint; M i s s Katherine Purcell,
Jackson; Mrs. Oscar Wilde, Detroit;
Mrs. William Tillman, Detroit; Mrs.
Glenn Bisby, Detroit; and Miss Lois
Webb, Flint.
Alpha Chi Omega are entertain-
ing alumnae of the sorority at the
house this week. Among the guests
are Miss Lou Babcock, Oak Park,
Illinois; Mrs. Paul Kraus, Detroit;
Mrs. John Mathis, Detroit; Miss
Aileen Leo, '30, Rochester; and
Miss Edna Mae Jennings.
Newly-initiated members o; Al-
pha Chi Omega are Thelma Ber-
ner, '32, Buffalo; Janice Gillette,
'32, Howell; Mary Morley, '31, De-
troit; Jane McPhail, '33, Detroit,
and Joyce Campbell, '33, Highland
Park.
Alpha Xi Delta initiated Audrey
Callander, '33, Zanesville, Ohio; and
Margaret Davis, '32, S a g i n a w.
Louise Nagelvoort, '32, was made
assistant rushing chairman of the
house.
Zeta Tau Alpha held formal ini-
tiation during Orientation Week
for Janet Hirt, '33, East Aurora, N.
Y., Gladys Schroder, '33, Plymouth;
Leila Hendricks, '33, Fulton, Ill.;
Helen Mikan, '32, Durand; Alice
Evans, '32, Huntington Woods; and
Miriam Carey, '32, Ann Arbor. Many
Detroit alumnae were present for
the occasion.
Headlines cut in half were used
to acquaint the frosh girls with
their big sisters at an Extra party
staged by the Deauw A. W. S. The
junior, who drew the upper deck
of a head, hunted until she found
a freshman with the coinciding
lower deck. Women dressed as
newsboys served the punch and

passed the newspaper covered pro-
grams.

Formal initiation of the new res-
idents of Martha Cook dormitory
will take place at 5 o'clock this af-
ternoon in the Blue room of the'
building. Margaret Berz, '27, for-
mer vice-president of the house,
will be the speaker at the cere-
mony as will Kathryn Van Zoeren,
'31, president of the dormitory, who
will talk on the ideals and stand-
ards of the dormitory.
Yellow mums served as decora_
tions in the Blue room of Martha
Cook last Tuesday afternoon, when
the old residents entertained for
the new students at a tea dance.
Besty Barbour honored new resi-
dents during Orientation Week at
a popcorn party held after hours
in the Playroom of the dormitory.
Helen Newberry gave a New
Girl's party on Wednesday to com-
pliment those students who have
not lived in residence before.
Adelia Cheever house entertain-
ed in honor of Prof. Edwin C. God-
dard and Mrs. Goddard at dinner
during Orientation Week.
Wells College Women
Show Much Interest
in Various Vocations
Graduates of Wells college show
much ability in numerous arts and
professions. One of the class of
1930 has entered the Yale School
of Drama in- preparation for a!
stage career, and one is now study-
ing at Union Theological seminary
on a $500 prize scholarsniip with
the aim of becoming a minister.
Six of the class are already mar-
ried or will be within the next few
weeks.
One graduate is doing compari-
son shopping in a New York de-
partment store, one is teaching
chemistry at Vassar college, and
another is preparing herself to
teach in Pennsylvania by taking a
special course in education at
Marywood college, Scranton. Two
are taking graduate work in Eng-
lish at Radcliffe, one graduate
work in English history at Wash-
ington university, a n d another
graduate work in history at the
University of Cincinnati. Wells Col-
lege is at Aurora, N. Y.
Women at the University of
Minnesota are offered five expen-
sive prizes for the greatest number
of subscriptions for Minnesota's
humor magazine, Ski-U-Mah. The
first prize is a 17-jewel white gold
wrist watch, with a setting of em-
eralds.'

a

PLAY MANUSCRIPTS~
SUBMITTED RIDAY1
Chairmen of Junior Girls Play
Hold Several Meetings
During Past Week.
PRINTING CONTRACT LET
Central committee chairman who
were chosen at spring election for
the 1931 Junior Girls Play have
held several meetings the past week
to discuss programs, play manu-
scripts and committee personnel.
The program committee, which
has been soliciting advertising all
summer under the direction of
Katherine Koch, has made a con-
tract with Dickinson Bros. of Grand
Rapids, for the printing of the pro-
grams.
All committee chairmen a n d

EDN A NICHOLSON PLANS
TUBERCULAR CASES
Miss Edna E. Nicholson, A. B.,no proo
winner of the fellowship of $1500 has bee
for her outstanding work with the I hope#

TO STUDY
IN ANN ARBOR
of of these many theories
m advanced. In my work
to arrive at some definite

Medical Social work for Tubercu- conclusion as to just what the most
lar cases, is planning to spend her common cause for tuberculosis is,
next year in Ann Arbor and Detroit and then to help in all possible
investigating the causes and pre- ways to Temedy the situation."

Iwas amazing nat bns yu ..
ful, slim, and unassuming person;
before me was the famous Carola
Goya who had received so tremen-
dous an ovation last year in New
York. According to her own state-
ment she is a "traditional dancer"
and has been dancing ever since
she can remember. "They all say
that, but with me it is true," she
said simply. "I studied first in Se-
ville under Otero, then traveled in
the provinces and country districts
in Spain to learn folk dances and
traditional dances that few Span-
ish dancers know today. The rea-
son many of my dances do not
seem Spanish to American audi-
ences is that those from the north
of Spain are closely allied to Rus-
sian steps and are vastly unlike
the most common Spanish dances
with which audiences here are
familiar.
"My concerts are received here
as well as they are at home," Miss
Goya answered my next question,
"but appreciation in expressed in

spoke an American young lady
who was very much at home in her
surroundings.
Miss Goya has been for several
years working on dance composi-
tions of her own. "I have collected
folk music which has never even
been printed," she said, "and com-
bine old dance steps with original
ones. I also find some of the mag-
nificent modern music very inspir-
ing to which to compose dances."
In speaking of the modern dances
Miss Goya continued, "I don't pre-
tend to understand it, though I
can feel inspiration from the mar-
velous dancing of Kreutzberg. I
think he is extraordinary and con-
sider him the genius of the age."
This is the dancer's first trip this
far west and only her second ex-
perience in a college town. She
expressed particular regret that she
could not attend the football game
yesterday, as she has viewed only
the Spanish versiord football.

ventives for tuberculosis.
Miss Nicholson said that in the
year that the fellowship gives she
expects to be getting figures on the
causes of tuberculosis.
"The death rate of this disease
is much higher among women than
men," she said. "Our work is to in-
vestigate the home life of all wo-
men in this vicinity who died of
this disease last year. The com-
mon opinion is that late hours, bad
working conditions, drinking and
poor home life are responsible, as
women are less able to stand the
strain than men. However, as yet

Miss Nichoison graduated from
the University ofL Michigan last
year. After her year of research
is through she plans to keep on in
the social work, especially in re-
gard to the study of tuberculosis.
The fellowship this year was a-
warded to three women. Miss
Nicholson is the only Michigan
graduate who has ever received it.
BUTLER UNIVERSITY-The plan
of giving short plays during the
noon hour every week was recently
adopted by the university dramatic
club.

r /11ll1l./J. 1./l /J.4./././.i", O1. .O./. . './1J./,®:t"./".PYl11.A',/ /./. Ol~l./,r °. /1,

Large Increase Shown
In College Entrants
at Tennis Tourney
Marked increase was shown in
the number of colleges represented
at the second annual College net
play tournament held this summer
at the Longwood Cricket Club, in
Brookline, Massachusetts.
Thirty-eight women were enter-
ed, nine from Vassar, seven from
Smith, seven from Radcliffe, three
from Bryn Mawr, and one each
from Wellesly, University of Cali-
fornia, University of Connecticut,
William a n d M a r y, Skidmore,
Jackson, Simmons, Hollins, and the
University of Maine.
Josephine Cruickshank, f r o m
California, won the title by defeat-
ing Marjorie Sachs of Radcliffe, 6-
1, 6-0. The ceded players were
Miss Cruickshank, Miss Sachs, Dor-
rance Chase, of Simmons college,
and Fanny Curtis, of Smith col-
lege.
Entrants in the College tourna-
ment, inaugurated last year by
Mrs. Wightman, do not have to ob-
tain any official sanction from
\their college authorities.

.fJ ~1 ~cU Wi'J~J ~Y J~R r

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11

SUDDN '

ORCHESTRAS
GENERAL
BOOKING SER VICE
Local and Detroit Bands
'Office: 228 Nickels Arcade
Dial 6470
J fternoon and Evening

I

_ _ ,,

NEW CO ATS
at very moderate prices are
featured at our
Fall Showing
Women's and Misses' Sizes and
Dress coats or sport coats-broadcloths or monotone tweeds.
Black, browns, greens, reds.

4

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MORE VALUABLE AS THE YEARS GO BY
YOUR PHOTOGRAPH

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NEWEST FASHIONS-LUXURIOUS

FURS

The College,
T AE smart young things you
see about town come here
for clothes because- our Misses
lashions have a collegiate flare

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High Waistlines
Flared Silhouette
Sleeve Treatments
Crushed Collars
Tucked Backs
Narrow Belts
Superior Tailoring
Richly Full-Lined

Martin
Caracul
Beaver
Fox
Wolf
Fitch
Muskrat

Po HO
P H ON

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dill

be.

proud

of

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STUDIO

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