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January 18, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUINDAY, JANUARY 18, 1931

T H F

m II ,ICA NDATJ

-AGE 'TH

i

m

EDUCATOR IN \ SUH
G L
Personnel Blanks Filled Out by
Yearlings Over Seven Year
Period Basis for Work.
VOCATIONAL AID GIVEN
Professions Chosen Most Often
for Life-Work; Chemistry
Most Difficut Study.
(Speil lto1The/Furl.)
MORGAN TOWN, W. ., .n. 17
--A study of the personnl blank
filled out by all uiver.iy 1re h-
man men in the ol'= ua'de (,'
men, H. E. Stone of %.; vira:
university , during 2fova?",n'bc an'
December has be': mi. Th'
blanks have bcen usd b '
Stonc as a basis of cdue nI, oe
cupational and pern: al gdici ance
and as a means of obtaining facts
not available in other University
offices.
They have been filed each year
since 1923 by freshman men and
contain, among other things, a rec-
ord of the occupational aims of stu-
dent, occupational experience in-
cluding summer a n d part-time1
work during high' school years, ac-
tivitie; engaged in and honors re-
ceived during the high s c h o o 1
course, hobbies, a record of the,
freshman inteligence score, sub-
ject in which the student is hav-
ing the greatest difficulty, frater-
nity to which student is pledged,d
time budget, occupation of father,-
and other similar information.
Chemistry And English Hard.
Some interesting discoveries are
made by these personnel blanks.
For example, 23 different subjects
were named by freshman men in
answer to the question, "In which
subject are you having the great-i
est difficulty?" Chemistry and Eng-i
lish tied for first place as the sub-1
ject causing most difficulty. Each
received 68 votes. German received1
28 votes, French 20 votes, zoology1
15, physics 14, and trigonometry 73.
Law and medicine, engineering,1
agriculture a n d teaching were
named most often as the vocational
choice. Nearly 100 specific voca-
tions were mentioned however, in-
cluding construction work, build-
ing and loan management, drama-
tic critic, foreign commercial agent,
aeronautics, aviation, box manu-
facturing, credit work, public health
work, weather bureau work, short
story writing, and newspaper work.t
Six named dentistry which is not,
taught anywhere in West Virginia.,
None named a r t, architecture,
painting or sculpture.
Provision on the blanks for first,
second, and third choices is made.
Many individual students expressed
interest in occupations as diverse
as pharmacy, engineering a n d
coaching.
Need Vocational Guidance.
During freshman guidance con-
ferences career leaflets prepaired by
Dean Stone and others received
from the National Research coun-
cil, and other state universities
were distributed. References to1
books on careers included in theP
vocational shelf of the University
library were also given to fresh-
men in these conferences and in"
personal interviews with individual
men from time to time.

BUILDINGS IN OAXACA, MXIC LAW RUNS
EARTHQUAKE HITS WIIW / T JER! PA.T

W/lIEN
OF COU NTRY

LOTTERY TO AID
POOR IN DANZIG
City Approves Plan as Remedy
for Economic Depression.
(WV Associateld Press)
DANZIG, Jan. 17.-City fathers of
this free port have approved a plana
to found an international lottery
here-
They hope it will provide reve-
nIu to feed the wolf of economic
depression which has been prowl-
lng about the gates of Danzig since
the old Hanscatic city became the
Step-child of the treaty of Versail-
W (ti tl)(" netw 1portof Gdiynia I
right across the bay im-
t patronage of Poland, Dan-
unemployment figures mount-
i ed by 3,000 in December, bringing
the city's idle to more than 20,000.
The new lottery, which started
business at the beginning of 1931,
patterned after the English
:sweepstakes" system. The draw-
ing.s are to be based on big race
vents, the first being in connec-
ion with the English Derby of
i93L.
Danzig's share of the proceeds
will consist of one per cent of all
ticket sales, besides five per cent
of all sales in its own territory.
City officials will supervise the
draw and pay out the' prizes.

CARVETH WELLS DECLARES EQUATOR
IS'A DELIGHTFUL SUMMER RESORT'

Had to Wear Sun Helmets While
on Expedition, Yet Feet
Were Freezing.
Contrary to popular belief, the
equator is a delightful summer re-
sort.
Such is the revelation of Carveth
Wells, noteri British explorer, who
wiU lecture Wednesday night in Hill
auditorium on "Six Years in the
Malay Jungle." Wells recently re-
turned from Central Africa where
he headed the Massee expedition to
the Mountains of the Moon, sent by
the Chicago Geographical society.
"The climate of Equatorial Africa
j- as delightful as that of Bermu-
da," he declared. "The greatest dis-
comfort we had was from snow and
halistorms, but even when our feet
were chilled by the snow we were
compelled to wear sun helmets and
spine-pads to avoid sunstroke."
Mr. Wells first started his explor-
ing career when, because of the
starting of the World war, he 'was
left in the Malay jungles for six
years after he had started to do a
survey for a railroad sompany. He
is a fellow of the Royal Geographic
society.
"Mr. Wells is known throughout
the country as the man who makes
facts fascinating and the truth
sound like a lie," stated Henry Mo-
ser, of the speech department. "He
not only shows that truth is strang-
er than fiction; he also proves that

i is 1re ierestin; -especially
whe" pes 'U i".n hisvhimsical
manner. Sume of iNs stories are so
amlazing m hI hey provoke expres-
sions of .dt:b hef from his audi-
ene; but snce the facts and scien-
tists are with hm, lie is not per-
tur berl."
Among sme of the phenomena
of which Wells will relate are fish
tht wink, der seven inches in
height, and bouncing fish balls.
Remdans oF Tecumseh
Believed to be Found
(l,0-1., e ss)
SA1 . AO., Jan. 17.-Echoes
of a centry ago, when supremacy
of the Ohi valley hung in the bal-
ance, beteen embattled Indians
and wite, wre stirred today by
announcemnn that bones believed
to be thoe of the Indian warrior
Tecumseh ve een found on Wal-
pole Island.
Tecumseh whose a m b i t i o u s
scheme for a ar-fung Indman con-
federacy to drive out the white set-
tlers manifested itself in a series
of outrage. which kept the border
ablaze, was :lain in combat on Oct.
5, 1313.
North Carolina State college is
to have a southern conference box-
ing team for the first time this
year.

A seen in the city ef Oaxaca, Mexico, where a score of rsons were reporAe d hilled or inTd by vio-
lent earthquake shocks that rocked the entire southern part os the country. 43axaca was desvriibed as a
scene of desolation with many buildings in ruins.

4)

FORMER MORMON PHONETIC ALPHABET
IS PRESERVED IN ANCIENT TEXTBOOKS

Many Rubber
Caume Profit
to Riviera

Checks
Losses
Casinos

Brigham Young Committee Drew
up Letters to Keep Books
'Pure and Clean.'
SALT LAKE CITY, Jan. 17.-- A
phonetic alphabet, unlike that of
any existing language, is among
relics of the commonwealth set up
in the western desert by Mormon
pioneers.
Devised by a committee named
by Brigham Young, leaders of the
Mormon pilgrimage to the Great
Salt Lake valley, the Deseret alpha-
bet was taught for several years in
schools of the territory and was
used in books and for keeping ac-
counts.
Besides school text books, first
the Book of Nephi and then the
entire Book of Mormon, of which
it is a part, were printed in the
Deseret alphabet. Several of these
volumes are still in existence.
Because of irregularities of ac-
cepted English spelling and difficul-
ties they ersc ntedrto Mormon im-
migrants from Europe, Erigham
Young desired an alphabet that

would simplify the task of learning
to spell and write English words.
With such an alphabet, it was be-
lieved, youths of the Latter Day
Saints church likewise would notI
have access to the "yellow-colored I
literature of the age or any un-
wholesome r1eading."
Type was made and two school
books were printed in the new al-
phabet in 1368, and in 1869 it was
used in the publication of the Book
of Mormon. Gradually, however,
with the increasing settlement of

( P v lssvwvxlcd I'rrss
NCIE, ae, Jan. 17.- A verita-
bYe brmbardment of rubber checks
has hit Riviera gambling casinos.
In the yearly report of Eldorado
Casino, a small local organizaion,
[he ta atemJent is made that nearly
half of the neti profits was lost be-
cauvse of bad checks.
Doi-g a tota.! buisiness of about

the territory, it fell into disuse. $ "40,0', the casino showed a true
The alphabet's name was derived prOi t of only slightly more than
from that sdopted by Mormon pio- $1 0,)00.
neers for tIhe re igous community
they strove to esta rslih in the vai- Alt bad (lche( ks imist be Proseeut-
ley of the Great Silt lake. It was ed in the (c;urts anar though the
as the state of Deseret that they sgr} almost never are caught the
applied for admission to the union. 'egaIl ees constituted. another drain
The word "deseret" is from. the on the casino's treasury.
Book of lormon, signifying the Cnecasino directr; said the bad
honey bee. Ihsi, isbeen adopted, hlckl: less r -ns to about four per-
with the bee hive, as an emblem t aei e :fI Ihe net profit in ordinary
industry and stjit i o common o(,- , ms w;ith BuPriih and American
currence in Utah 'e gamblrs the worst offenders.

American

Fear
See

So

s in China
lver Loans;
Fal1 in Price
. - - ' -N

e cannot mae 1w ll the ice cream w we ust make. theinst of it.
Ice Cream Cakes
;just think of the possibilities for surprise by serving for dessert a real
ice crcam cake. IIMade in regular cake likeness, anddecoraed with
whipped ctein ill any color you may ish.
Special!
Stabrv I~e frn
IennSherbe

(U, A

SHANOHAI, Jan. 17. - Alleged cf-
forts of silver interests in the Unit-
ed States to arrange a silver loan
to China despite the Nationalist
government's unfavorable attitude
toward the project prompted the
Shanghai Ame-r ie Chamber Or
Commerce to protest to the Ameri-
can Chamber of Canimneree today.

"A n Arbor's Best See Cram"

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i
If you are more or less "broke" in this era of reputed
hard times, if you are not satisfied with your rsent

-.

.1

room, or if OL
"mope" about it.

ve lost your

tse

te.

There

is a way, simple, inexpen-

dog-don't sit and

SIVe, and without trouble to you, to rid yourself of all
your worries.

Phones 22553

-136 nird Street

CIASLIL

The Shanghai tmar repro
FARM BOARD H EADrsenting a majority of Anerican en-
terprises in China, cabled a ro-
FAVORS EMBARGO ion to the Washington body say
ng such . lo wou esilver
Legge Indorses Burtiness Bill;prices to
The reshM mo s;~ilt neri
hon Wheat, Grains, Bfttr. can cha er tocll l catten
(Bv Associated ress) Ition of nol- c stainmtthe
WASHINGTON, Jawn. 17.- Chair- serious nthrea
man Legge of the federal farm ening American bus i ess in China,
board today indgrsed the bill by and requested that Presient Hoo-
Alger B. Burtness (Rep.), North ver take internatiol steps toward
Dakota, for a two-year embnrgo on a remedy.
wheat, feed grains and butter. The Shanghai organization sug-
In a letter to Rep. Burtness, Mr. gested immediate reef cod be
Lge said the bill,"is along theI obtained if the Amrig ern-
right ines as affording perhaps the 'mont would foster an in.ternattional
quickest method of dealing with the agreement stipulating no further
situation." sales of silver be made for any gov-
"However~" he continued, "it is ernment and if leading nations
immaterial to us how this result is would purchase silver in the world
arrived at, but present conditions markets for coinage purposes to the
certainly justify action on tie part limits of their respective laws.
of Congress to meet the emergency. ---PEWR-T-R
"Just how this relief is to be af- 1YPEWRdHEI?
forded is perhaps not material. REPAIRING
Some time ago in writing Senator All makes of mac ne'.
Capper, I sugg sted that unless Our equi'pwrt and per-
there was an improvement in world s o n n e I are considered
conditions we would ask for a tern- among the best in the Suite. The result
porary embargo on wheat imports. of twenty years' careful building.
However, just as strong an argu-
melt could be made on-other grains 0. D. MORRILL
-including beans." 314 South State St. Phone 661

I
1
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_
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_
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t

Our stock of ValentIines is la ge and
complete including comics.

The circulation of the Michigan Daily

covers prac-

Don't forget your otler and

Swet-

tically the entire student body and faculty as well as
hundreds of residents of Ann Arbor. Here is a rich
field with unlimited possibilities for results from
Classified advertising, a field that no other publication
covers half so completely as the Daily. Why not be-
come one of the many regular users f the Classified

[t
5

_ _:

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Pricts
FR FEMA N'S I

NOW ON DISPLAY AT ANN
ARBOR'S DISTINCTIVE GREET
ING CARD St-OP.

section-one trial and the results

for all time.

will c tixince

you

4 d

I

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