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January 16, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-16

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T'WO

THE MTCHTGAN DATLY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1931 ~

Staebler

Estimates

ity

Has

ore

Than

1,000

Job less

850 TOR SEEKERS
LISTED AIT ACENCY:',
'OIT IE

ENGLISH PRINCES TO MAKE TOURT Youth Saves 20 Men
OF SOUTH AMERICAN CONTINENT ,LD d"'Impsned in Tunnel1
Annual Intcrnational 0 ,ratorica

Mayor Says

More Than 3,0001

Akre Directly Affected Through
Present Depression.
SEEKS ADDITIONAL JOBS
ronstruction Projects Expected
to Provide Positions for
Many During Minter.
More than 1,000 men and women
are out of employment in the city,
1 was estimated last night by
Mayor Edward W. Staebler. At the
'owest figure, the mayor said, there
are between three and four de-
pendents on each of the people out
of work and betwe !t j00 arid
4,000 persons in the cetJ directly
affected by the present situation.
At the employment exchange
last night, maintained under the
direction of the mayor's committee
in the Chamber of Commerce build-
ing, there were 650 persons regis-
tered seeking work, W. H. Faust, in
charge of the exchange stated.
There are about 15 calls per day for
nmen to work, he said, and estimated
that six more persons are registered
each day.
Men Clear Woods.
The number of unemployed was
Ottimated on the basis of the ex-
change reports and on the reports
of several of the social service or-
ganizations in the city. One hun-
dred fifty men were thrown out
of work last week by the disastrous
Cavac Radio company fire. None
pf these men have registered yet.
Relief work in the form of distri-
bution of sand and wood has been
extremely successful, Mayor Staeb-
ler reported. Sand has been furn-
Ished by the University and by
several organizations in the city
and is sold to the residents of the
town as a remedy for icy walks and
slippery steps. Men are also at work
in nearby timber tracts clearing up
dead wood which is sold at current
prices to the people of the city and
is also used to provide fuel in homes
'here this is necessary. The pro-
seeds from the sales is used to buy
meal tickets and to adespecially
S roe WilleAid.
#aam blet being
_ e cont e, relief is
alexpected in construction jobs
through the rest of the winter. The
'Vinewood sewer project, held up
through some property differences,
has bee-n rerouted and will soon
provide employment for possibly 50
men. The $350,000 sewer project will
very soon be let, the pamphlet
states, and contains a clause assur-
ing the employment of Ann Arbor
men. Where possible, University
cons ruction contracts are speci-
fying the employment of local
labor.
The pamphlet also contains some
"arpdies of unfairness in the treat-
ment of unemployed men. In one
instance a man received 25 cents
%or four hours of work.
Jones to Give Reading
from 'Crock of Gold'
Continuing with the third of the
series of programs sponsored by the
League library committee, Prof.
Howard Mumford Jones, of the
English department, will give a
reading from James Stevens' play,
"The Crock of Gold," at 3:30 o'clock,
Sunday afternoon, in the Grand
Rapids room of the League build-
ing.
All men and women students.
faculty members, and townspeople
may attend the affair and the tea
which will follow.
Astronomy Room Gets
Semi-Annual Cleaning
(By Associated Press)
PASADENA, Cal., Jan. 15.-Twice

a year the giant 100-inch lens of
the Mt. Wilson astronomical study
room gets its face cleaned. It is no
small task and requires a new
makeup of nitrate of silver. Suecial
machinery is required to lift the
four and a half ton mirror from the
telescope tube.

Contest to be Featured
!y 12-.MLiute I a izs.
Pouir ac'u.t n emother coun-
riae';s wil spek in th iir1st annual
intovrn'tional oratorical contest ati
3:30 o'clck, Sunday, in Lane hall
auitorioui. They ore Abraham An-j
lar, '31.,U_ fr.; Yuk'n Feng, Grad.,
of China; John i. Khalaf, '33L, of
P a 1 e s t i n e, andi Ka!mil Toonian,

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,

Humans Learn But
Little Faster Than
Rats. Says Shepard
"The distinction between rats and
human beings in learning mazes is
not so great as might be supposed,"
said Prof. John F. Shepard, of the
psychology department, last night,
in addressing the meeting of the
Psychological Journal club.
Professor Shepard, who has been
engaged during the last few years
in conducting such exu riments
personally, and in correlating the
results obtained by other observers
among his advanced classes, finds
that humans learn only a little
faster than rats do, and that their
methods indicate a slightly better

+ C S ;:nc:
E
__ .. .. }

Republican Offlc I Expresse\
Willingness to Retract
Camipaign Statement.
WAsHINGTON, Jan. 1. Alfred
iE.Smhhda .pytoyfon
Robert Ii. i
!only a Cola~ t;lnaL uK.' f wel
pr esidun iad ('e id 1' t'ImuflOed
of the OXC niV rl( 0 te r
pxubion nat john cuoi
Smith. in a loter a S u I a It o r
Wagner. Democr. t N w York, had
a kod apolo y from w R'epi-bl;ean
comnmittee for "prni t i!' Le
to distribute a barom carlOen
which, he said, ntool. ned . - a-
tion attributed to him whia hediele
had not made.
Lucas issued a statement Wedn-
day niglt Saying he woui apol-
ogize for sending out a em-t;(n
representing Smith and Ciftir mnm
Raskob of the Democratic n~ijateal
committee as wets if Smith wiould
announce he now favored prohi-
bition.

Grad of Iraq.
F'cng will compare "COciliiclanism o
end ChhistiAni y," Anta: will talk of $ -
"Missionary Work in frac." and
Khalaf will speak about simiar ac-
ctvities in Pales na 'IT'onian has
chosen as his subjet "'he Torch
Bearers." The talis, 12 minutes
long, wili be jujgud on a basis of AssociateC Iriss t'hoto
60 per cent content and 40 per cent WelI Morgan,
delivery. San Francisco youth, who res-
Awards of S15 and $10 will be cued 20 men trapped by a cave-in
given to the speakers rated first in the tunnel of a water project.'
and second by the judges, who will Morgan dragged a pipe beneath the
bt Prof. Edwin C. Goddard, of the falling rocks to supply the impris-I
Law School; Floyd K. Riley, of the oned men with air.
speech department; and Dr. Fred-
erick B. Fisher, of the Methodist
Episcopal church. d ;
Announcement of the contest has
been made in the weekly bulletins
of the various Ann Arbor churches,
and through letters sent to all for-
eign students and several hundred U Lull
American students on the campus. -
The patrons of the eighth annual Democrats Modify Requests; Ask
international banquet, Thanksgiv- . Government Funds to
ing eve, have also been invited. Feed Starvin

1
t

ability to judge from their memor-
ies of paths.
The experiments with human
subjects, however, have not yet
reached the stage where more than
very general indefinite conclusions
can be drawn, he said. Professor
Shepard delivered a similar address
to the American Psychological asso-
ciation meeting in Iowa City dur-
ing the holidays, but he stated that
last night's discussion was more de-
tailed than the former.
-I -

. t S,'.' 1'it o
The Prince of Wales (left) and his brother, Prince George, who
will be traveling companions on a trip through South America in the
interests of British commerce. Map shows the route they will follow in
the southern continent.

I
i
I

i
J
b 9

I

CR ECOMMITTEE
REPORlTS 'FAILURE'

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

- J

State Body Admits Inability
Discover Cause; Terms
Wave Gigantic.'

to

(y Associated Press)1
LANSING, Jan. 14.-After more
than a year's study the state crime
commissio4 authorized by the 1929,
legislature has made its report, de-
claring it was unable to determine
the primary or moving cause of
crime and describing the problem
as one so gigantic a permanentf
commission shouldbe c stablished.
Gambling, the use of narcotics,1
"easy money from bootlegging," the
use of liquor by minors and other
things were mentioned as probable
causes of crime, but the report said
there "is no single cause; likewise
there is no panacea to be offered."
To discourage crime in the fu-
ture the commission advocated ac-
tion by the legislature to requireI
schools to offer instruction in char-I
acter, morals and law observance.
A psychiatric clinic at Jackson
prison, permanent grand juries in
the larger counties, stiffer penal-
ties for "racketeers," periodic auto-
mobile drivers' licenses and modifi
cation of substantive laws to pro-
vide standardization of punish-
ment were recommended.
French roup to Giue
Three One-Act Plays
The Cercle Francais will hold a
I Soiree Dramatique in the Labora-
tory theatre, Wednesday, Jan. 21,
it was announced yesterday. The
program will consist of three one-
act plays: "Le Cuvier," an anony-
mous medieval French F a r c e;
"Franches Lippees" by Tristan
Bernard; and "L'Ecole des Belles
Meres" by Eugene Brieux. Both of
the latter are contemporary works.
The Soiree is part of the year's
program for the Cercle Francais
and admission may be secured on
the season ticket. Tickets may also
be purchased at the Laboratory
theatre (formerly Mimes) box-
office on Wednesday evening.
TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machines.
Our equipment and per-
s o n n e 1 are considered
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.
0. D. MORRILL

NEW RECORD SETI
FOR CONVIC TIONS
County Obtains 769 Convictions
in 882 Prosecutions.
A record of 86 per cent in con-
victions of the total number of
prosecution for the six-month per-
iod ending Dec. 1 was made known
yesterday by Carl H. Stuhrberg,
former prosecuting attorney. Of
882 prosecutions, the county suc-
ceeded in obtaining 769 convictions,
a new high mark.
Two sentences meted out by Judge
'George W. Sample were life im-
prisonment, while 63 others were
given terms at either Ionia or Jack-
son.
bi'vers Escape Injury
in L oAuto Accidents
Two au .rmobile accidents occur-
ed almost simultaneously Wednes-
day afternoon.
An automobile driven by Bennett
Weaver, 1426 Brooklyn avenue, was
demolished when he crashed into
a telephone pole at the intersection
of Ferdon and Wells streets in an
attempt to avoid colliding with a
machine driven by Charles Hahn,
734 Fountain street.
Five minutes later a collision oc-

curred at the intersection of Fourth
and Ann streets in which cars driv-
en by Dr. A. H. Pearson, 303 First
National bank building, and Elmer
Gage, 1607 S. State street, were in-
volved. Dr. Pearson was making a
left turn from Ann to Fourth street
when the collision occurred. Both
cars were damaged.
In each instance the drivers es-
caped injury.
RED CROSS GETS I
FIRST DONATION
Citizen Aided by Society Starts
Fund in Ann Arbor Drive.
A contribution of $5 from a man
whom the Ann Arbor chapter of
the Red Cross aided in obtaining
compensation was the first check
received yesterday as the drive
opened to raise $1,000 for relief of
sufferers in the drought-stricken
areas of the country.
The money, the contributor told
the Red Cross, was taken from his
compensation check.
Appeal for funds was launchedt
following receipt of a telegram from
the national chairman of the Red
Cross in which the organization is
attempting to raise $10,000,000 to
be used in relief work in the affect-
ed areas.

(13v Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15..- Driven
back from their $15,000,000 food
loan demands, the senate Demo-
crats reformed their lines today in
a new stand for
appropriations to
feed those threat-
ened with starva-
tion.
The leader of
the minority, Sen-
ator Robinson of
Arkansas, set as
. the price of com-
pleting the legis-
lative program for
this session a $25,-
000,000 fund to be
JoSEPH QInNSoN administered b y
the Red Cross,
without provision for repayment.
Seoi g the hopelessness of their
earlier position, the food appropria-
tion sponsors yielded Wednesday to
let the $45,000,000 drought relief
loan appropriation go to the White
House, stripped of the Caraway
amendment which would have giv-
en $15,010,000 more for food

The most popular ready-
to-eat cereals served in
the dining-rooms of
American colleges, eat-
ing clubs and fraterni-
ties are made by Kellogg
in Battle Creek. They in-
clude ALL-BRAN, Corn
Flakes, Rice Krispies,
Wheat Krumbles and Kel-
logg's Shredded Whole
Wheat Biscuit. Also
Kaffee Hag Coffee-the
coffee that lets you sleep.
BRAN FLAKES
7J~si , ,ctIOo

WI

THRILL to the flavor of Kel-
logg's Pep Bran Flakes. That's
the matchless flavor that has
made them known through-
out the nation as better bran
flakes.
PEP for flavor-bran for
health-whole wheat for
nourishment. No wonder Kel-
logg's Pep Bran Flakes are
so popular and so good for
you.
Ask to have them served at
your fraternity or campus
resturant.
BIR N FLAKES

. _. .

SO
k x
OVER A MILLION PEOPLE HAVE
READ THE BOOK!
-now Kathleen Norris' best-selling novel
comes t the screen as a soul-thrilling drama
of modern narriage.

LAST TIMES TODAY -
O Oette RConA

s _ _ __ _ __ .. ._ '

I

,
iR J "ta( { ,k w
...R VV 4] ...:

I

A TRULY GREAT PICTURE!

7A': .

She could not help being a love-thief.
Follow her fascinating heart story in
KATHLEEN NORRIS'
cum L-
PHS V

314 South State St.

Phone 6615

--., - --- .__.r
I

STARTING
TODAY

H M E1
RIGT FROM TH FOX, DETROIT

2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

III

I

Y~ 'BENNY RUBIN-
hi KEN MURRAYE
'~ a ,_ tfil r Ume n

--the woman who
what she
wants!

gets

LOI
MORA

I,

with

J. HAROLD
MURRAY

KAY FRANCIS
CHARLES BICKFOIID
KAY JOHNSON
LEWIS STONE
h.. ZASU PITTS
William De Mille

IN

"UNDER SUSPICION" IH

II F

I

In

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