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January 15, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-15

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V THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1931

THE MYCHIGAN

DAI LY

' ® , +

W. A. A.
FACULTY MEMBERS
PREPARE SURPRISEi'
STUNT FOR AFFAIRl

to Sponsor

First

Annucl Basketball Spread

Women to Meet at 6 O'clock
in Lounge of Women's
Athletic Building.
PLAN SHORT PROGRAM
All Students Who Have Interest
in Basketball, Members of
Teams Are Invited.
Faculty members of the physical
education department for women
will entertain those attending the
basketball spread at 6 o'clock to-
night with a surprise stunt, the na-
ture of which has not been an-
nounced. The spread will be held
in the lounge of the Women's Ath-
letic building.
The Women's Athletic Association
is sponsoring the spread to promote
enthusiasm and to further social
contacts between members of the
intramural teams which have been
playing during the present season.
The spread will be short and in-
formal, and the entertainment, be-
side the faculty stunt, will be im-
promptu.
Arrangements for the affair have
been made by Marion Gimmy, '31,
and Elizabeth Loudon, '32, who have
been assisted by the interclass
managers, Susan Manchester, '32,
Frances Manchester, '34, Helen Wil-
son, '31, and Louise Peterson, '33.
Any women students interested in
basketball, as well as those who
have played on teams, are invited
to attehd. All of the faculty mem-
bers of the physical education de-
partment for women have been es-
pecially invited to attend the af-
fair.
This week will end the first round
of intramural basketball g a m e s.
Those teams which have won two
out of the three games played will
play in the elimination series next
week. The schedule of games which
has been folloWed so far will not
hold for the elimination series, ac-
cording to an announcement by,
Miss Marie Hartwig of the physical
education department.
"The co-operation under the new
intr jtnural system which has been
shown by the teams is encourag-
ing," Miss Hartwig said. "Under
this system we are including many
stray players who would not have
played otherwise."
Members of the coaching staff
haves been watching the games to
select players for the interclass
teams, which will play during the
second semester. It is expected that
there will be two teams for every
class.
I <
ntrmural
I...NEWS
Schedule of Games Today.
4 o'clock-Mosher vs. Jordan.
League 7 vs. League 5.
5 o'clock-Phi Sigma Sigma vs. Sig-
ma Kappa.
Delta Zeta vs. Alpha Omicron Pi.
Results of Wednesday's Games.
Alpha Chi Omega 25, Pi Beta Phi
20.
Chi Omega 23, Gamma Phi Beta
6.
Adelia Cheever 22, Alpha Epsilon
Phi 19.
Kappa Kappa Gamma 13, Martha
Cook 10.

INDIANA UNIVERSITY - The
university recently passed a ruling
prohibiting students from trans-
porting their ladies fair to or from
social functions in automobiles un-
less the driver is a parent of one of
them.

NEWARK AIR LINE
EMPLOYS HOSTESS,
Assodiated 1rs CPh IJoto
Wanda Wood,
Who is one of the new hostesses
on the transport planes flying be-
tween Newark, N. J., and Washing-
ton, has as her duty the entertain-
ing of passengers enroute.

ELE(ATES ISCUSS(CON(lIFFE TO CIVE

CO-EDUCATIONAL C
FOR WOMEN ST

OLLEGES EXIST
UDENTS IN SWEDEN.

Because Students Older Rules so roll call is really unnecesary."
TUOENTPROBLEMSSC ADo Not Govern Housing Miss Aquist also stated t h a t
or Attendance. Swedenwasmore like United States
Three Women Among Michigan Subject Will be Discussion of in aegardyto t ion ow n
"Do tewmni wdnatn than any other European country.
Representatives at International Problems o - edutional irstitutionsatten She said that women from all walks
Conference. in Various Aspects. course," said Miss Ann Ida Aquist, of life were in the various busi-
assistant classifier at the Unvriynesses and professions and that
asitn-casfera h University there were even women in the Riks-
Questions of interest to students "Scientific Methods in Interna- Library, in a recent i n t e r v i e w. dag. Swedish women think no more
and faculties of all types of colleges tional Problems" will be the topic of "There are women's colleges there, of going around unchaperoned than
were discussed at the National Stu- Dr. John B. Conliffe's address be- but many of the women attend the weo over here either
dent-Faculty conference held in larger universities just as they do
Detroit Dec. 27 to 31. Ruth Van fore the members of the Ann Arbor here." The most noticeable difference
Tuyl, '31A, Erdine Griffith, '33, and branch of the American Association "There is one difference, how- between United States and Sweden
Albertina Maslen, '31. represented of University Women at a meeting ever," she continued. "In Sweden to her is in the number of servants.
Michigan women at the convention, to be held at 3 o'clock, Saturday we receive a degree which would She finds that because they are so
and attended the meetings of the acompare with your A. B. in our much more expensive here, we do
various commissions which consid- afternoon m the ballroom of the public schools, so that the women not have anywhere near as many.
ered individual problems. League building. in our colleges are older than the Particularly, she finds little differ-
All delegates atternded service' Dr. Condliffe, visiting professor in students over here and have no ence in the weather, if anything,
of worshipgwhich wtereed sever economics from New Zealand, has supervision or housing rules at all." she thinks that Sweden is slightly
mforibyProf. Wh 0ee Mendene studied and taught in New Zealand, "Even in the classes, no roll call warmer around the southern part
mo riends Universiy. SMedenhal England, and on the continent. For is taken. It is up to the students than Michigan.
followed each day by a talk on the six years he was a professor of eco- whether they will attend classes or Miss Aquist was formerly in the
various pases of nomics at Canterbury College, Eng- not and as the classes are all lee- library at the University of Lund
a sph f religion and cul- land. Before assuming his present tures, no one knows who is absent, and in the public library in the City
ture by Prof. Reinhold Niebuhr, and position on the University faculty but the students are anxious to go of Gotenburg, Sweden.
the assembly continued its activi- he was with the Institute of Pacific- -- -- --- --- -_-_------
ties for the rest of the day in small Relations.
groups or commissions.
Discuss Attitudes. eDring the war the speaker serv-
Miss Maslen attended the ses- ed as senior economic instructor
sions on "Social Attitudes and Re- with the New Zealand Expedition-
ary Forces and his most recent ap-
sponsibilities," which were lead by pointment has been to the Sec-
Prof. Harrison S. Elliott of the Un- retariat of the League of Nations.
ion Theological Seminary. Discus- He will take over his duties in this
sion was based on case histories of capacity following his departure
various colleges, and the special from the University next Septem-
questions of social conditions, in- ber.
dustrial and inter-racial problems, Dr.Cndlife has also published
compulsory R. O. T. C., and cases
of dishonesty were considered. The several books among them are: "A
commission attacks the problems Short History cf New Zealand,"
from two angles; those involving New Zealand f the Making," and t.is
temporary and permanent results. "Problems of the Pacific" and it is
They reached the conclusion that present day inter-
national problems can only be
results could only be reached by solved in a dispassionate way.
working from the leaders of small Mebedip cassillae rqy.
groups to the general community Membership cards will be required
Miss Van Tuyl and Miss Griffith for admission according to Mrs.
participated in the assemblies on Louis Karpinski, president of the
"Social Organizations on the Cam-r local A.A.U.W. although they may
pus," which dealt mainly with the ibe received upon payment of yearly
relations between the students and dus at the door or through the
faculty. Much attention was given urrto Miss Loa Tinkham, tres-
to the idea of a council epmposed urer. All this Season's Arctcs
of both faculty and student mem-
bers, vicmen being permitted to NEWS OF ALUMNAE Regular $4.00 and $4.50 Values
particinat. The commission advo-
cated closer relations between men Mary White, '29, is studying med-
and women students in matters of iine at Columbia University.
student government. The discus- Ruth Kenyon Wagner, '30, daugh-
sion was lead by Prof. Dean Thyrsa ter of Professor Charles P. Wag- Nickels Arcade
Amos of the University of Pitts- ner of the Spanish department of
burgh. the University of Michigan, has
Considers Religions. just been appointed to the library --
All of the delegates attended the department of the Hispanic Muse-
general sessions whicl considered um of New York City.
the problem of "Religion in Col- Dorothy M. Lyons, '29, is located
lege." All phases of Y. W. C. A. in New YorkCity, where she is em-
work were discussed, and the pecu- ployed as a stenographer with the
liar religious methods of different' Charles Cory Corporation. Miss
types of schools were the subjects Lyons lives at 400 West 118th street.
dealt with mainly.
"A campus of the type of the Uni-
versity of Michigan is not as affect- PERMANENTS
ed by a problem of this type," said
Miss Van Tuyl, in speaking of the $4, $6, $8
conference. "The large number of
churches in Ann Arbor can cope Service with $6 and $8 Waves
successfully with the situation, and Oil Shaf D
such a general idea as compulsory OampooforDand-
chapel would be impossible here, ruff ........ .. .$1.00
due to the variety of religions rep- (Corrected from Thurs. Ad)
resented."an
Finger Wave 75c
I TYPEWRITER (short hair) au l

Sigma Alpha Iota Gives
Bridge Party in Honor
of Ann Arbor Alumnae
Alumnae of Sigma Alpha Iota,
national musical sorority were en-
tertained by the active chapter
Tuesday evening at a bridge party
held in the Grand Rapids room of
the League building. Virginia For-
sythe, '33, was in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mrs. Blanche Gallup and Miss
Nora Crane Hunt, instructor in the
School of Music, of the alumnae
chapter, and Miss Vivian Croope,
'31SM, of the active chapter were
those receiving prizes.

THE SOPHISTICATE
By Margaret Hapgood, '31.
Paris has been interesting itself
with pajamas, now for several sea-
sons; at first very moderately with
beach pajamas, then expanding
their use to many fields.
Of course;lounging on the beach
is hardly one of the recreations that
Ann Arbor offers, nor have we tak-
en to serving tea while garbed in
them, as is a popular custom many
places.
Nor are we likely to begin wear-
ing them to proms, even though
some of them are hardly distin-
guishable from evening dresses,
they are so cleverly designed and
made.
However, there ,are many pajamas
that could find a definite place in
a college girl's wardrobe. For in-
stance the three-piece ones, made
of jersey that are being shown in
so many shops, would be ideal in
which to study. Think of how en-
joyable they would be on these cold
winter nights when you stay up late
and the heat goes off early. It
happens in even the regulated
1houses.
Even though college does not run
the midnight spreads of the movies
and newspaper ads, there are the
hash sessions and bridge games at
which a pair of warm good-looking
pajamas would be appreciated .Andj
these jersey pajamas are good look-
ing. They come in bright colors
and designs which we are accus-
tomed to associate with s p o r t
clothes.
Then there are the silk lounging
pajamas which are ideal with which
to impress your week-end hostess
or guest.
Pegasus Invites Those
Interested in Riding
to be in 'Ensian Photo
Any women who are interested in
riding and intending to join Peg-
asus next semester may be included
in the picture of the group which
will be taken at 12:40 o'clock Fri-
day afternoon, Jan. 16, at Dey's
studio, according to Ruth Babbitt,
'31, president of the organization.
Members are asked to bring their
dues Friday, and to wear a riding
shirt for the picture.
The next meeting of Pegasus will
be held the first Thursday of the
second semester. A meeting of the
officers will be held before then,
the date of which will be announc-
ed later.

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M arcells ............75c
RAGGEDY ANN
BEAUTY SHOP
1110 South University
Dial 7561

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Crepes and Woolens
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One group Utility Coats,
alpaca curl, tweeds, boucle.
Sizes 14-40.

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