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January 15, 1931 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-15

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1931

THE MTCHTG.-/',,N DATLY

r G

. .. .. ............. . .. . . .T....... . . ...... . .......

i tii\fi~P! ri

Sitjuation Descr cd as Greatest!
Emergency Ever Facing
Organization.
CONGRESS ARG-,UES LOAN

POWER COMM, ..'>1' 'ht~ISSIONE ,:ssRS' DISMISSAL

Senator Jones Hopes to Carr
Appropriation Bill to
Senate Floor.
(By ssoriatd Proms;)
WASHINGTON, Jn . rrj^Rc
Cross stepped out in cins toda
to deal with "the ~real.,:.rrt emr
gency in peace tin!. tz i2 ,lo-
ganization has Cever b tlcn1cc 'al:ed.
on to meet."
The situation h it l ? , . flictec
states was described i.A 1 io rword
Tuesday night by Jem Barton. th
national chairma n, as h set ir
motion a $10,000,000 fund-raisin
campaign.
Meanwhile, the' cong'ressional
struggle over appropriation of mon-
ey for food loans to the sufferer
went on unabated. The leaders o
the administration forces, lined u~
against an outlay, worked for a
break.
Jones Takes it to the Seate.
Senator Jones, Republican, Wash-
ington, prepared to take the con-
troversy to the senate floor by re-
porting disagreement in conerene
with the house over the $15,000,000
food fund in fle drought appro-
priation bill.
A vote was in prospect on wheth-
er to release his group fro? insist-
ing the amount be retained. Sena-
tor Caraway, Democrat, Arkansas,
succeeded in having it inse ted 'ori-
ginally, without serious opposition.
There has been no senae rol call
on the provision:
Payne Makes Statment. I
Payne made his statement soon1
after President Hoover had issued
a formal proclamation calling for
public contribution of a minimum
of $10,000,000. The Red Cross chair-
man said he expected the cost of
relief would overshadow the ex-
penditures following the Mlissi ssip~i
flood of 1927, which cost i $1,994,-
868. Already some $5,000,000 of R~d
Cross funds has been given over to
the present task.
Three hundred and fifty counties
in 17 states already have people
been fed by the Red Cross and four
other states were seen as possible
recipients of aid before the task is
done.
The drought appropriation meas-
ure finally reached the conference
stagve through action of the house
yesterday. After an eight-day dead-
lock, the administration leaders put
th ough a motion to refer the bill
for consideration of the f o o d
amendment.
T YPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All aakes of machines
Ovr equipment and pe-
s o ni n c I are considered
among the best in thc State. Thc result
of twenty years' careful building.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615
ArH ou pepacd o bsnes
WiolYOkowoughBcomteFia,
Management Prdutadlii-
sAres you pdesire o uies
In yutknne onthaoutAn peae
taon QIstituteesp youeactle
kcuidofrinhbinssyouio willdot
whenyotareoutnfcollege rdanongu
and thoughly etr anidethe dirc-
tionss o busieeprs eeyuwl
len businemossuANlsae!i
pracicaeerienumyceivte a pplcicaio
of those fundamentals.

Practical Tr'ai nin g
at BABSON Institute
Students at Babson Institute keep regu-
lar office hours. They dictate reports,
take part in conferences, and study the
fundamental laws of business. Babson
Institute is a place for work, not play;
for the kind of "brass-tacks" training
every ambitious young man wants! TheI
instruction is intensive -- no wasted j
time on trifles.
You owe it to yourself to fil( out hlow the
Pabson Institute Corse my provide ;x direct
route to business ac1ievcmn,n for yop. Send for
a tnPY tof our buliet,"i:oitiing for Business.
Leadership'' whh givesfu'[ in~formnation. It will
be sent without any obligation on your part.
Next term ope-ts March 28
Mlail Coupon for FREE Book
ORNB ABSON INSTITUTE.11
# D~iv. K318 Babson Park, Mass. #

'?

Va u m tbDe h iq e .. fte d v peor n s thatut?
from this field of research ar, .1' t
subjects of the principal art~i,c;o
the JanuaLry number ftmfwhi
the Cnneeriugshcwi N
rggo on sale Mon rday in h li s
the West Enlinerzxinbuld;
"The Catho'de R^y,<, lora>
by W. Herbert ihGd.vl
of the use of this iearcheslin in
on power Irarsn m,- on l
fundamental pr inipl_'. f fn' O.
lograph aredeotrtdan
plied to this fieldio cerh
Sanmuel 'E. Coopc, , ,'sh
author of the other m d n1
phase of work, 01'he Terhiie
H-igh Vacuum Practice." C( xr
explains the methods used in o-
taining th~e extremelly rarilwe pr
sures that must be used in mdr
tubes of this type.
"The Michigan Engineering So
ciety," by Prof. Ferdinand Nv.Moo
fee, of the departmlent, of r~gnu-
lng mnechanics, is a shortbifo
the history of thie:; an~ao
fror its four-ding in 110b rf
R. C. Carpenter of the M ..~
Agricultural college.
Burned brick, i10,000 )yeas ' ol,
supposed to be the first brick in !itryoUhewrl aso
in Egypt. With this as a satn
point, Charles A. Bowen, co'ra -Li st,
traces the development of this ito
portant building material in ji
article, "Brick."!
The January issue include
a number of shorter artileson
phases of engineering, a seection t,,
book reviews, and somie enginesering
notices.
CThe Technic will be d istributedc
Monday and Tuesday unrder e
system. Students will sign for the}
copies on the honor plan.

1-
i
is

a ,
x
,,

fm siWhnof dsadpnso ray Jaspe
;;,m Aswr hoPH,-i"Uevr iee from the
~ flori~'; aid1 us su merin the
ence libaryalheCheitr,!y library
W ' ~u(h~'81an~ th Scoolof Music building,
'V 1 0,cli 10(10' 11r11' These crap.; hey acu itonine-
.-( 0W n j itl't' mur: adcnine hem to
V ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ C '~i:~ ' 1 ~ 1 fn eforo arnsofce in, thIe
dens Diut.'~APerer'lV Lileogs andGronds building.
iig ll,0 0 1111unOltV'?1:ts eurd to evenings'
hoer.'wrk.
(f s ot.lLo lii , o 1em3n1 The (tfC twa urriinThe
0 '11,01'( j 1'vntt (0ofc,14f'tsusrnw pesenbt'

'
T

iiScientists

iii fl(ci

tR.AN) G FOEMN USES CAST-OFF
M TOSOL VE HIS PROLM

EERTS B'a EVELOP
T ESTIN "' F' SQILS

of University De~lve

yonl ayoutthe versatility, in-
'; awiththe id o grory, .conoy, and progressi ve-
fruE irai a- !'. L Mchgtiuis so-called "B3. and
Z2'i>5I eda hug pil C. boys.,"

William V. king;, former accountant, and Charles A. Russell, former
I solicitor of the old power commission, whose dismissal by Chairman.
Smith and Commissioners Draper and Garsaud of thxe new commisieon
drew Senate fire and brought forth a demand that nominations of
Ithe new comnmissioners be considered.

NotesT
"- Midland, Bay City, and Sagina w
--- haye decided to take part in the
~; 'iL of n,,issance and alumni 10 ye'ar program, T. Hawley
- ;narchitecture Tapping, general secretary of the
Are Included. Alumni association, stated yester-
daiy. Tha amount which they will
1 (1''g ~is o itlia Reais contribute has not been decided, he,
coo 1'0 10 hug ad Italian andI said.
Ainris aaicltee 'reare on view
*' ~ c ?'odo e ne y the fine H arry Kipke, Varsity football
' 'rooms A and B coach, aned T. Hawley Tapping leave
'1. 'iij Ba~'0ill al. The ex-j today for Davenport, la., and South

CuRgTOR TO SPERM
ON WUHK IN CHINA

Illustrated

Lecture Scheduled

for Sunday Night; Will be
Fainal{ Appearance.
Dr. Josselyn Van Tyne, assistantj
curator of birds for the museum of
zoolcegy, will give an illustrated lcc-
ture on "A Scientific Expedition in-
to Indo-China," at 6:30 o'clock Sun-
day, Jan. 18, in the parlors of the
ICongregational church.
Dr. Van Tyne was recently ap-
pointed a member of the University
and Carnegie Guatam~alan expedi-I
I tin. The lecture will be his last
pub-lic a pp e<Lrance before he sails
fro;.. Ne Orle _;'ans Jan. 23.
'3 eodre ~dKermit Roosevelt
heeiedth trosinto southeast and
sou- 1twest Chi,).). which were spoon-
sores by the Fileld museum in 1929.
Harold Coolidge, assistant curator
of mammals at Harvard university,
and Russell Hendee, noted mammal
collector, were members of the ex -
pedition. Dr. Van Tyne will present
at this lecture some slides he made
on the trip.
UNIVERSITY OP CHIC.AGO - It
has been suggested by several per-
sons here that the university be re-
christened "Rockei'eller."

]Prof. TobiasJ. C. tic itoff,; of
the German dc-.rtment, ,Nifl de-
liver a talk at 2 o'clock thai afi-
ternoon from thei Universi ;y stu-
dio in Germa 1. 7Histop)ic will be
"Neuere deut.,>he und cutsch-
amerikanische Ly rik." The Mid-
nite Sons quartet will present
the musical program.
I3,80 ftients Finish
Segcop;d Classifiation
More than 3,800 students in the
literary college, music and educa-
tion schools were classified for the
second semester yesterday, accord-
ing to Prof. Daniel L: Rich, in
charge of classification. This num-
ber represents approximately 90 per
cent of the total enrollment in the
three schools.
Of the 400 yet, to complete classi-.
fication, more th-an hialf w:-, prob-1
ably not ret urn. to the University
for the second semester but will beI
supplanted by new registrations or
transfers who have had no oppor-
tunity as yet to classify.
Success in the last two years
of pro-semxe Ater classification was
again proved this semester when
85 per cent had classified in the
upper three divisions by the Christ-
ma s holidays. Freshmen were regis-
tered duri-,kg the week after vaca-
tion.

hitii oae'h o'aninVintended'
hr~~~ ; ~u sorlied in the courses
I r' Iby hedepartmient, is ex-
nci'd tointeestother arts enthuis-
1 i ~ i fI. h phtographs
115 no. bon ntielyfiished yet
1>1 d1; e ~'crd t :t)y the end
01.~~~~~ :.N'.o, it ~~cexhibit; will
be rsIN'i'il s~oingwill con-
to0 lit e cueof the .semester.
Tin'enl'bitin oin A consists en-
irely o i ~!'<I aianpaintings of
~~~~~~~te 1111 l' e isneperiod. I
. n'( i'bi nlo, 7nartists of

1;

Algriculture.V
S 'curing dependable knowledge
of the nature and reliability of the
soil in which his structure rests> has
been a problem: to the builder since
the ancients began-1 to erect mas-
sive structure s of stone. Rule of
>thumb methods p~revailed even
after much m ore,0adequate knowl-
edge had benootained in modern
(times. Nwba ,ed on a series of
ctuzal tes,enigineers of the Uni-
vereity-o Aicig an Department of
;n;ineering Research have devel-
Oed the first rational scientfi
fo °r ulas whiich may be 'appe
w i practicali results to foundato
problems.
The now m~et~hod of approach
does not begin with a theory of the .
strength of an ideal material for
a foundation, and then adjust the
facts to these theoretical rules as
was customary, but it recognizes '
taeahparticular soil has its
seilcharacteristics which con-
trol the carrying capacity of any Y
foundation. The new method ideni-
tifis these controlling properties as
' the compressibility and the she~ar-
ing strength of the soil. Methods of
measuring these, and a mathema-
tical formula which correlates thxem~~
are the features of the work whh
make it applicable to a wide range
of engineering problems in this ;'
field.
The financial and safety aspects
of the work are an excellent exam~-
plc of the practical importane oft
scientific research to engineer~ing
since needlessly heavy sub-struc- ~
tures, or cheap and unsafe footings
may both be avoided by the archi-
tect. Many of the experiments were
made originally to determine the
proper construction of the Fart.
Street grade separation in Detroit.,
The Wayne County Road Comis-. ,
sion and various city deparment
as well as the Detroit Edison Comi-
pany, the :Ford Motor Company and
the American Society of Civil En-
gineers assisted or participated i~n a
the investigations.

v __ - 1 > 'De11 40 sct'i ero', as
wl s 501. - of tlssr..knon
'IWorkman on Hospital oe. o'orps0irewrk
Addition Loses Ice h}; 'n't 'loe vi enin
Ray Willmorth, workman t "lIx tin .
'Dew UnDiv-Irsity hospital a t 0 1 'O 1 it b en Ihe pho-
who was injured recently wTe i. '01'1 Ilfl'7e 1ud ner-
stone crushed his left leg ,, cei- . "'a'cts. .Al yp~of
tating amputation belowt n o ,( i 1 u faieli cueem-
is mapidly recovering, nyWi! ;ma /f hsaaC tcsaeto
ported yesterday. o 'i '7j 1IleiS' o-
Willmorthwai'ingtoe .w nrcnS-
be returned to erifo ute ili~ ' .setoieiAm-
When one fell o i e asn A li oas iitru
compoun::d fracture ofbehbn I'0
below the knee. Doctors rao t''h;txibi soe ree to the
hip condition inuch imprOves ndoibi to2(1lt horsof 9 and l
his release from the hospitali oo~0'oN
weeks.

Bend, :led., where they will visit
University of Michigan clubs.
High school students at Dayton,I
Ohio, who plan to attend the Uni-I
versity are being assisted by the
University of Michigan club of that
city which has recently appointed
a committee to inform students
concerning the entrance require-
ments here.
Letters nave been sent to the
various high schools suggesting
that during the first or second year
of attendance students be advised
that the entrance requirements at
the University of Michigan. are
higher than those of many western
institutions, and that it is therefore
necessary to make a correct selec -
tion of c'')urses while In high school.,
Cleveland alumnni have been ac -
tive in a similar way during the-
last three years.
SWE RENT .
W E E 14VICE aUlO S
CRZOSLEY AMIRAD BOSCH
SHOP
Tel. 2-2812 615 h... William
WA., T ADS PAY!

SCHOML F MEDICINE
DURHAM, N. C.
On October 1, 1931, carefully
selected first and third year stu-
dent ;Mwill be admitted. Appli-
cat;s may be sent at any time
Band will be considered in the
corder- of receipt. Catalogues and
application forms may be ob-

I

9

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Classified Ads tat Really Click
No matter whit you have to sell or what
you want to buy the Daily Classifieds will
help you in your problem. Simply call
21214 and your ad will appear in the next
issue of the paper.
Jf you have a r'oom to renlt iiow is the 61-1C
to advertise it. The second semester will
find many students without rooms. Th1e

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b e-ng Get your copy of "Gcas rH.ct'- free,

I Fill I!!

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