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October 04, 1930 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-04

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'SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 193 I

THE MICHI'GAN

DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

,OOTO~E~4,193O THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~GE ~~VEN

I

PRElICT ACTIVE
MURA L PROGRAM\

I

PLAYS FULLBACK

Ii

I

Enrollment
Year

Points to Banner
in Various

Activities.
MANY SPORTS LISTED
With the closing of the first week
of activity in the Intramural sports
department, John Johnstone, su-
pervisor of sports, stated last night
that present indications point to
one of the most active years this
department has known. The en-
rollment in the varied sports which
the Intramural offers has far ex-
ceeded 'that of last yea over a
similar period.
Speedpall continues to lead in
popularity, with over fifty frater-
nity teams lready enrolled in the
19 30 tournament. Independent
and class teams are also organiz-.
ing for this sport. More than 1100
men participated in this sport in
1929. Play will start next Wednes-
day afternoon when eight teams
open tournament play in the fra-
ternity division.
W0~eyb'all, which is second only
to speeaball in preference, will
connience tournament play Oct.
g4. ° tries in this sport are being
leelved 'now from fraternities as
al as class groups, independents,
ati a&Ouly teams. Trigon frater-
riity holds the championship from
1929 and are counted on to put in
a strong .bid for the present tour-
eanpt hnors. Junior engineers
',the laurels from the frosh lts
in the inter-class trials. Nume -
d ,* ill be awarded to the members
of the winning team in each divi-
sion.
Soccer activities will begin Oct.
X14, with entries closing two days
,erlier. Medals are awarded to
e victors in this competition.
Iayers ho have already enrolled
re asked to report Monday after-
no at 4. Tennis competition and
;Or hops will also open Oct. 14.
C and medals are the trophies
ipe ;warded in these sports.
Oter activities will be announced
as the season progresses. In all,
the Intramural department offers
a choice of 31 sports to the men on
h Campus.
WA TERMAN G YM
PgLWON NEW PLAN
ree towel service has been ob-
tain d for the users of Waterman
gajhaig according toDr. George
A.>May, director, who announced
gesterday the receipt of a letter
prom the Board of Regents grant-
ing the necessary funds for the
iew service.
This innovation at the old Water-
mnan gym will be of distinct value
.u the men who live north of the
eampus and find it inconvenient to
*each .the Intramural building. Dr.
ay also stated that the gymnas-
'1.muis now in readiness for all the
en on the campus to use outside
Iclass periods.
Instruction is offered in the vari-
Sus sports similar to that at the
itramural. The free towel service
pill be inaugurated within the next
,wo or three weeks. A deposit of
fifty cents ,payable at the treas-
j~er's office, is required on the
owels, but will be returned at the
end of the college year.
raf t Fiisch Sets
Series Record of Hits
(By 4ssocated Press)
PHILADEPHIA, Oct. 3.-Frankie
Frisch, St. Louis Cardinals' second
bseman, today held the all-time
orld .Series :record for hits made.
r cFr s double in the first inning
of the aectond gamen'eYesterday gave
im a total of 43 World Series hits,
jne more than made by Eddie Col-

lins in six series. This is Frisch's
sixth series. Hie was with the Giants
in 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, and the
Cards in 1928 and the present
series.
OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY
-Under the rushing rules recently
passed by the Panhellenic associa-
tion, no dates for freshmen with
men can be arranged by a sorority
girl, rooms may be used only for
teas and parties, sorority girls may
not accompany "freshmen to foot-
ball games, and sorority girls are
not to take freshmen to church.

FIELDING RECORD
BROKEN IN SERIE S
Only Nine Assists# Registered
by Cards and Macks.ae
(13v Asso~(ciate d PI'c s)
PHILADELPHIA, Oct 3.-Baseball Michigan Will Encounter Tough
record books today revealed that Foes for Season's First
the World Series' contenders shared Cross Country Meet.
an extraordinary fielding feat in the
second game, the St. Louis Cardin- THREE VETERANS BACK
als, by making only four assists,_
broke the World Series' record for Michigan's varsity harriers will
the fewest number of assists in a pry the lid ch their scbcdule on
single game, and the Philadelphia October 23 when Coach Hoyt
Athletics, with only lve, tied the matches his charges with Michigan
previous mark. State Normal School of Ypsilanti.
The Cardinals actually should Last year the Wolverines were left
have gone through the game with in the distance by tho Huron run-
only three assists, for one of the ners, and chances are that the men
four was due to a dropped third of Ypsi will present a strong front,
strike that forced Mancuso to make this fall, as they usually are well
a throw to first base for a putout. represented in the world of cinder
Adams, Frisch and Gelbert had the grinders. Ypsi can be counted on
other assists. to furnish plenty of opposition.
The record in this feature of de- The Wolverines have three vet-
fensive play was set in 1921 by the erans back, Fitzsimmons, Wolf, and
New York Yankees and equaled by Austin, who are expected to carry
the same club in 1927, the Pitts- the brunt of the burden in defend-
burgh Pirates in 1927 and the Ath- ing Michigan prestige. In addition
letics in one game last year. to these men there are three other
_ runners from the 1929 squad-
Feustel, Crawford, and Hayes- who
are out for the team. Among the
new candidates who show the most
CHATTER promise are Hill, Howell, and Klann
of last fall's freshman squad.
The first real trial of the year
(Continued From Page 6) 'will come this morning, when the
Kipke appears to have chosen candidates will start on a two-mile
Purdum to go against the Spar- run at 10:30. The squad has been
tans although there is a possi- practicing daily for the past ten
days.

AT GUARD POST

HLE TIC
ST. LOUIS
Cardinals to Seek
of Series Af te
Two Cont

INVADE
TODA Y
zFirs;t Win

k

I

(Continued From Page 6)
never relinquished in the second
contest. Besides his hitting feats,
Cochrane has also handled his
pitchers with a skill that has been
remarkable.

r Losing
ests.

Al Simmons remains the slugging
star of the series, with a home run,
a double, and a single to his credit,
giving him a batting average well
over the .400 mark for the two
games. Miller, Foxx, Dykes, and
Haas have also hit timely for the
Pete Cornwell whose work at right Mackmen.
guard in this season's practice ses- tHankie Frisch, the backbone of
sons has given him the opportunity the St. Louis team, has proved to
of showing what he can do for the the big star of the Cardals int
the series thus far. Although it
1'N a?!N a ri 1:1170 7110nQfafainv ra

Ir11 IVI
Sally Hudson veteran of last year's
Wolverine grid team who will start
in today's contest with the Spartans
at the fullback position.
fNDIANA-BUCKEYE
CLASH ON TODAY:
(Continued From Page 6)
with Vanderbilt, and a tight battle
may be expected with Minnesota
reigning as a slight favorite to take
the game. In the Iowa-Oklahoma
Aggie game the bigger school should
have a distinct advantage over its
opponent.
Both Wisconsin and Chicago will
face double headers this afternoon
when Carleton and Lawrence in-
vade Madison and Ripon and Hills-
dale attempt to stop the Maroons
at Stagg Field.
TODAY'S GAMES
Michigan State at Michigan.
Indiana at Ohio State.
Baylor at Purdue.
Iowa State at llinois.
Vanderbilt at Minnesota.
Carleton and Lawrence at Wis-
consin.
Ripon and Hillsdale at Chicago.
Oklahoma A. and M. at Iowa.
Tulane at Northwestern.
Wildcats Fear Threat
of Tulane in Opener
(Special to The Daily)*
EVANSTON, Ill., Oct. 3.-Tulane's
Green Wave which starts rolling
northward this week threatens to
engulf Northwestern's Wildcats in
the opening game of the season at
Dyche stadium tomorrow.
At least the Greenies' 84 to 0 tri-
umph over Louisiana Institute last
week end indicates that last year's
southern conference c h a m p i o n s
pack considerable power. The game
is by far and large the toughest
assignment ever undertaken by a
Big Ten team for the opening game
of the season.
"We plan to shoot the works,"
Coach Hanley stated in commenting
on his plan of attack against the
invaders from the southland. "There
is no doubt but what we will have
to use everything in the bag to eke
out a win over Tulane."

bility that Samuels may get the
call. It is a certainty, however,
that both of these men will seeI
plenty of action before the game
is over this afternoon.
Bill Hewitt and Norm Daniels will
be in charge of the end posts against
Coach Crowley's men, and while
Hewitt was one of the strongest
men at his position in the Confer-
ence last season, Daniels is some-
thing of an unknown on the flank,
having gained most of his experi-
ence in the backfield last year.
Hewitt is best known for his ability
to spill the interference so that the
tacklers can get at the man with
the ball. He-is also a capable pass
receiver and a shifty runner after
he gets the ball.
In his backfield, Coach Kipke
has at least nine men who can
be depended upon to give a
good account of themselves in
almost any competition. Cap-
tain Simrall, Wheeler, Gold-
smith, Cox, Heston, DeBaker,
Hudson, Tessmer, and Wills are
all capable backs among whom
there is very little to choose.
However, the combination of
Simrall and gDeBaker at the
halves, Tessmer at quarterback,
and Hudson at full seems to be
the smoothest which has been
uncovered so far.
Simnrall, with two years of regu-
lar Varsity experience, will get the
call at half because of his superior
blocking ability, with DeBaker as
his running mate because of his
speed and faculty for hanging on to
passes. Tessmer seems to have made
his place at the signal chirping post,
while the big Hudson has the neces-
sary speed and drive for a fullback.
Should any change be made
in this combination it is prob-
able that Willie Heston will get
the call over DeBaker. The oth-
ers of the backs will without
doubt get in the game, but the
major burden of rolling up a
presentable score against the
Green will fall upon Tessmer,
Simrall, Heston, Hudson, and
DeBaker.

!

VARSITY TRACK
All candidates who wish to try
out for the weight and jumping
events are requested to report to
Yost Field House at 3 o'clock any
afternoon. Experience is not
necessary.
Coach Hoyt.

maize andz iue wnen tiate invada e U
the lore of the Wolverines today.
GAMES ON AIR,
TODAYI
The radio football season gets
into its stride Saturday with play-
by-play descriptions of important
games in all parts of the United
States.
At 1:45 p. m. WWJ will begin
broadcasting the Universitygof
Michigan and Michigan State Col-
lege game in Ann Arbor. This will
continue until 2:20 o'clock, when
the World Series game in St. Louis
will be given to the radio audience.
WWJ will return to the football
game in Ann Arbor at the conclu-
sion of the World Series baseball
game .
WJR also will broadcast the U. of
M. game direct from the Stadium.
The Ohio State and Indiana
game will be broadcast by WLW
of Cincinnati.
Tulane and Northwestern will be
on WGN, KYW and WBBM of Chi-
cago.
Vanderbilt and Minnesota will be
on KSTP, St. Paul; WCCO, Min-
neapolis-St. Paul.
Notre Dame and Southern Meth-
odist, on Columbia network.
Southern Californiaand Oregon
State on KGO, Oakland.

was his error that paved the way
for two Philadelphia runs yester-
day, he has exhibited a brand of
heads up ball throughout the en-
tire series, and has contributed his
share to the vaunted, but thus far
absent, Cardinal batting attack.
Frisch, in the second game of the
series, established an all-t i m e
mark, when he crashed out his
43rd safe hit in World Series com-
petition, to surpass the mark set
by Eddie Collins.
Burleigh Grimes, Jim Lindsay,
and Sylvester Johnson have all
looked great in their appearances
to the mound, although the lat-
ter two were used only as relief
hurlers. Grimes made the mistake,
however, of pitching low to the
sluggers of the Athletics on several
occasions, and at those few times
the A's were able to pound out
enough extra base blows to win
handily. Flint R h e m, heavily
counted on before the series open-
ed, was batted hard in his only ap-
pearance so far.
In winning the first two games
of the series, the Philadelphia team
has added to the already astound-
ing record compiled by American
League teams in recent years. The
junior circuit has now won 14 out
of the last 15 World Series games
played, and the Philadelphia team
is bent on maintaining the record
and stretching it to 16 out of 17
before the present series comes to
and end.

C LA SSfF I Ef
ADVERTISING .LD'
NOTION
NOTICE-For Dependable Service
send Clothes to the
MOE LAUNDRY
204 North Main Street
Phone 3916
HOME COOKED MEALS-Reason-
able rates by the week. 625 For-
est Ave. 5
KONOLD VOCAL STUDIO-Voice
culture and singing. For begin-
ners and advanced students.
1908 Austin Ave. Phone 4855.
BOARD BY WEEK or by single
meal. Mrs. Hall, 332 E. Jeffer-
son. Phone 7716. 456
DRESSMAKING AND ALTERING
-Ladies' and Men's coats relined.
Evening gowns a specialty. 1133
White St. Phone 22020. 456
WAN f ED
WANTED-2 students to work 2
hours five nights a week. 911 E.
Washington. 5
INSTRUCTOR desires kitchenette,
one, or two rooms. Apply Box
141. This Paper. 5X
CLOTHING SALESMEN WANTED
-One with years of experience
for part time and Saturdays.
Experienced only need apply.
Student preferred. The Fair. 345
WANTED-Students for observa-
tion who have had little or no de-
cay of their teeth. Compensation.
Apply to Dr. Philip Jay in Dental
Building. 3456
COOKING JOB WANTED in fra-
ternity or sorority. Formerly cook
in Marbruck Tea Shop. Phonle
Ypsi 708-J. 345
WANTED-Part time salesman,
good pay. Apply Goldman Bros.,'
214 South State St. 23456
WANTED--Students bundle wash-
ing. All socks darned free. Will
call for and deliver. Call 2-3365.
123456(2)
.OR RENT
FOR RENT-Front single room.
Ideal conditions. Located between
the Hospital and campus. Rea-
sonable. Phone 6348. 1348 Geddes.
ROOM-Suitable for upperclass-
man or graduate student. Mod-
ern, clean, quiet house. 601 E.
Catherine near State. Phone
9033. 561

'B' TEAM OPENS
AT MT. PLEASANT
Courtright Takes Green Squad
of Gridders to Central
State for' Tilt.
(Continued From Page 6)
ite in today's contest.
In the probabl'e lineup will be
Jordanand Gitman at the tackling
posts and Podlewski at one end.
Both of these tackles have been
showing to good avantage the past
week in practice, putting in many
hard smashes in both defensive
and offensive work. Podlewski as
an end has been getting out under
long, passes and generally proving
himself the best bet for one of
the flanking positions.
In the backfield at least two men
have been outstanding. Berkowitz
and O'Neil have evidenced good
headwork and the ability to gain
through the best walls set up
against them. The player that
features a nose guard as part of
this equipment, Keuche, has been
working at the quarter position all
week and will probably have the
signal calling job today.
Outside of these few men, the
team has no outstanding material
to boast of, but plenty of gridders
who are anxious to show what lies
hidden in them. Coach Courtright
should develop something with a
punch before the season is over
and this opening game with Mt.
Pleasant will do a lot to determine
the reliable men.
KALAMAZOO - With the an-
nouncement that Kalamazoo col-
lege will play their game against
Grand Rapids Junior College at
night another school has been ad-
ded to the growing list that are
featuring this new innovation.

'

T This Delicious
Week End Ice
Cream Special
It's a three-layer brick-and say!-it's a dandy!
All the goodness of Ann Arbor Dairy ice cream
packed into each layer and the three blended into
a tasty combination.
Vanilla
Lemon Custard
Maple Nat
ANN ARBOR DAIRY
The Home of Pure Milk
Dial 4101

COMPLETELY furnished apart-
ment. Beautiful double room,
one single. Steam heat, shower.
Garage. 422 E. Washington. Dial
8544 or 9714. 561
FOR RENT-Cozy room near cam-
pus. $3.50 per week. 541 Packard.
Phone 3608. 56
FOR RENT-Piano studio for prac-
ticing. Phone 5407. 561234
DOUBLE OR SINGLE ROOMS-
Block from campus. Steam heat.
Showers. 536 Thompson St.
Phone 2-2266. 56
FOR RENT-Very pleasant two
room, front suite and large dou-
ble for students or business peo-
ple. Also garage. 909 E. Wash-
ington Ave. 5
LARGE-Light front room, double
or single, two blocks north of
campus. '114 North Ingalls.
Phone 7437, 456
LARGE-Bright room and tower
room, suitable for lighthouse-
keeping; very reasondble. 555
South Division. 456

-W3

6

0ur New Fall Styles in
-*
[For Both Mm and Women]
WAll Interest YFu-iostestyles sio
Also a Very Fine Showing of fib, $7 and S8 Shoes

ROOMS ON THE CAMPUS-719
Oakland. 2 single, double, and
a very desirable suite; well fur-
nished and heated; rent reason-
able. _456
ROOMS for students and young
business people. Newly decorated.
Mrs. Hall, 332 E. Jefferson.
Phone 7716.
WARM, PLEASANT ROOMS-Sin-
gle and double shower. 2 blocks
from campus. Rent reasonable.
509 South Division. 456
FOR RENT-Nice, light, warm
front room. Double $6.00, single
$4.50. 724 S. Division. 456123
FOR RENT-Reduced prices. Rich-
ly furnished single rooms and
suites. Best locatio4 ,715 E.
Huron. 2345
SOUTHEAST SECTION 5-room
apartment with garage. Call at
1301 Granger. 234561
2 VERY attractive rooms for men.
Newly decorated; new beds; very
reasonable rent. Phone 7019.
}923 Greenwood. ix
FOR RENT -Four-room unfur-
nished apartment, one and a
half blocks from campus. Oil
heat, frigidaire, soft water fur-
nished. Call 6937 or 5091. 123456
FOR SALE

Ssfato-se
PWE GE PINS
BU ONS, BADGES
GUARDS
STATIONERY

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