100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

TFIF MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1931

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to~ the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
ni this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor.
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mnaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FRAN K E. COoPER, City Editor
News Editor .............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ..........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor .............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor ...........Mary L. Behymer
Music, Drama, Books........Win. J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor......lHarold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor ..........George A. Stautet
Copy Editor ..................Wm. F. Pype.
NIGHT EDITORS

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
David M. Nichol

John I7. Reinmel
Richard L Tobin
Harold O. Warren

SPoTs ASsisTANTs
Sheldon C. Fuilerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Robert'Townsend
REPORTERS

I . E. ush
honias M. Cooley
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
F±rank B. Gilbreth

Wilbur . Meyers
Brainard W. Nies
Robert L. Pierce
Richard Racine
'Thleodore TI. Rose

Campus Opinion
Contributors mae kd Ito be brief,
corlfSi lng tiicna-isck olehss Ithat- 300
words~ if possi ide. Anonyml~lous comn-
niunications will ir d sregarded. The
namies of coniuic it s will, however,
he ireg rided as confidiential , upon re-
quest. Letters p1ibiished should not be
construe, as expressing the editorial
opinon of Th le D aily.
DEPORTATION FOR
"TREATMENT."
To the Editor:
Recently in "Campus Opinion" a
writer appeared to disagree with an
editorial which The Daily ran fa-
voring Secretary Doak's plan for
deporting our gangsters and racke-
teers in our larger cities. He wishes
to be counted among those advo-
cating "sincere, determined and in-
telligent schemes to get rid of
them." So do millions of other pub-
lic-spirited citizens of our country!
But they have no plan to offer but
simply complain that nothing is
being done, and when a sensible
plan is suggested disagree for the
reason that "we wouldn't deport a
case of diphtheria just because the
patient happened to be foreign
born.
He states the answer to this ques-
tion himself when he says that
crime is a social ailment. As diph-
theria is a physical disease that has
a known cure, it cannot be com-
pared to crime. For crime brings
up the question of morals of the
individual which are seldom
changed by "treatment" as the
writer suggests; and he has no kind
of treatment to offer. Certainly we
would like to deport all cases of
diphtheria if it were possible. It
would be getting at the cause and
not looking for a cure. The same
holds true for criminal instincts
Deportation would be the surest.
safest, easiest, and most practical
method for getting at the cause of
the trouble, since we have not yet
found a cure.
If the writer would look over any
of the newspapers of our large
cities such as Chicago, New York.
San Francisco, St. Louis, and other
c;ities bothered with crime, he will
Lnd that the names mentioned in
connection with the crime reports
are invariably suffixed with a for-
sign combination, the whole being
quite unpronounceable. A s h o r I
time ago the Tribune in Chicagc
published a photograph gallery of
he gang leaders who had been
killed during 1930, and except for
Jhe negroes, the names were all ex-
"remely foreign. The same paper
isted the twenty-five most impor-
tant leaders of crime in that cit3
,hat they wished deported and
they were all of foreign birth.
It would seem therefore that the

OSTED LL
I WOULD
I WERE A LARK
UPON THE WING
In fact I feel pretty bad, and you
can take my word for it, Stranger.
Why only yesterday the swellest
little babe came up to me and told
me that my column was foul, unfit
for publication, terrible and scur-
rilous-and you know what scurri-
lous is, or rather are-those little
things that run around campus
eating nuts.-Well, I warned you
beforehand that I felt bad. Honesty
bids me state, however, that that
Dne is attributable to Godfrey,
otherwise known as "Count Scur-
rilous of the purlieus."
* * *
I see that our witty contem-
porary the Gargoyle has print-
ed a very fine list of the play-
ers who are to defend The
Daily's title in the annual Cage
Classic (Niftic if you prefer)
some time soon. This is all very
well, but they forgot the most
important part of the squad,
namely the reserves. The re-
serve lineup is to be as follows:
Denton (Lighthorse) Kunzee-......
..................... Tim ekeeper)
iolly (Holster) *Mabley ...........
.Scorekeeper
Jave (Dave) Nichol . . Asst. Tmkpr.
Iarold (Tiger) Warren, Asst. Scrkpr
Juerney (Boo Boo) Williams ......
.Referee)
?owers (Battling Siki) Moulton-...
.......................Ref. A sst.
e *Da
Dear Dan.:

About Books
PLAYWRITING CONTESTS
Longmans, Green have recently
announced the fourth annual play-
writing contest. It is conducted by
the Drama League of America inl
conjunction with the publishing
house. The National judges for the
full length plays will be Waiter
Prichard Eaton, critic and author;
Stuart Walker, producer and play-
wright; and Arthur Edwin Krows,
author of "Playwriting for Profit."
The Judges of the religious plays
will be Dr. Norman L. Richardson,
Prof. Harold A. Ehrensperger and
Mrs. A. Starr Best. The National
Judges for the one-act plays will
be Kenyon Nicholas. dramatist, the
American Academy of Dramatic
Arts, Alexander Dean of Yale Uni-
versity Theatre. The State Judges
will be announced later. The pur-
pose of the contests is the discovery
of new authors and the develop-
ment of native American drama.
As has already been indicated,
there will be three divisions of the
contest. The one is the full length
play which may be on any subject,
(although an additional cash award
will be given for a play meeting
satisfactorily the specifications of
good, clean, high class comedy). The
one act play must be appropriate
for presentation on the George
Washington bi-centennial in 1932.
It is suggested that these plays be
on some subject which actually re-
lates to Washington. The religious
play (which is something of ar in-
novation to meet what is called a
great need for plays on ethical
subjects) must be full length and

DINING

IF YOU RECEIVED
THE LETTERS
you write
Would you be proud of them or
just a bit sheepish? What about
the appearanceof theenvelope-
the paper? Would they make you
want to read the letter itself?
Old HampshireStat:oneryhas
that ability-it impeh one to
read the message. It is aristo-
cratic, rich, substantial. It makes
a letter stand out of the crowd.
Hampshire Paper Co. ine Stationery Department
Souh Hadlcy Falls, Mass.

i

Clean, Pleasant and With Excellent Service
ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

F

Complete Line of Everything Musical
THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE OF PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK RADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit
UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynard & William
Phone 7515

TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING

All makes of machines.
Our equipment and per-
s o n n e I are considered
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.
O. D. MOR RILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

ASO%.-

A4

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
FREEMAN'S

ROOM

kkack Goldsmith TJerry E. Rosenthal
,oland Goodman Chrts A. Sanford
Morton Helper Karl Seiffert
Edgar Hornik h oert 11. naW
Bryain Jones Edwin M. Smith
Denton C. Kunze George A. Stau ter
Powers Moulton John W. Thomas
John S. Townsend
Eieen, Blunt Mary McCall
Elsie eldman Margaret O'Brien
Ruth Gallmeyer Eleanor Rairdon
Emily G. Grimes Anne Margaret Tobin
Jean Levy Margaret Thompson
Drotny Magee Caire Trussell
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Business Manager
KASPER -. HALVERSON, Assistant Manager
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertising.................larles T. Klint
IAdvertising..........homas M. Davis
Advertising............William W. Warboys
Service................ .. Norris J. Johnson
Publication...........Robert W. Williamson
ICirculation .............. Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts.................honas S.Muir
usjiess Secretary....... ....Mary J. Kenan
Assistants
Harry R. Beglev Erie Kightlinger
Vernon Bishop Don W. Lyon
William Brown William Morgan
Robert Callahan Richard Stratetmeier
William W. Davis Keith Tl'yrer
Riehard H. Hiller Noel D. Turner
Miles Hoisington Byron C. Vedder
Ann W. Verner Sylvia Miller
Marian Atran ieilen Uas ii
Helen Bailey Mildred Postal l
Tsephine Convisser Marjorie Rough,
Maine Fishgrund Mary 1. Watts
Ilorothy LeMire ohanna Wiese
Dorothy Laylin
SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1931
Fight Editor-RICHARD L. TOBIN
ITALY SCORES A KNOCKOUT.

If anything ever awakened the majority of our crime was brought
United States to a realization that on by ignorant foreigners who came
perhaps Europe isn't so distant over here perhaps to follow some
after all, it was the recent Italian honest trade and are baffled by oui
crossing of the south Atlantic by high standards and ideas of living
They see in our highly organized
eleven seaplanes in formation led crime rings an easy chance for gain
by the intrepid General Balbo. Not and living conditions closer to those
only did the crossing make real they left. Other countries have not
histortonly did ig prove Ita the poor legal system nor the im-
history, not only did t eItaly'smense unguarded wealth that en-
coming importance in the world of courages the criminal. Get our wise
industry, aviation and expansion, underworld autocrats out of the
but it definitely showed the unbe- way by returning them to theii
lieving pacifist element in America own countries for "treatment," ano
that there IS a possibility of over the weaker hangers-on and the ig-
norant tools of the leaders will fade
night danger via the air from a away for lack of protection.
possible foreign invasion. The cross- Arthur Perrow, Jr., 34.
ing was made in 17 hours and 15 ----- ___
ninutes with perfect safety for o-------- --
both planes and pilots. itorial Comment
But disregarding the potentiah-
ties in war which the flight has -- - - _
proved beyond a doubt, there is an PRESIDENT BUTLER
element of commerce which must ON FOOTBALL.
be even more important to a peace- The opening gun of the 1930-31
loving world. Europe can trade with football hullabaloo, if not its heav3
Argentina easily, over established 2rtillery, was contained in Dr. Nich-
air routes, run by officials of conti- olas Murray Butler's annual report
nental governments. S q u a d r o n s in which he attacked present-da
such as the Italian one can cross athletic abuses and proposed the
every day in the year via the cle- formation of an "Academic Athletic
ment atmosphere of the south League of Nations."
equator with cargoes of goods for Dr. Butler is not the first to dis-
their near relations in the south cover that alumni "passion for vic-
Americas. There are many Italians tory at all costs" and "enormous'
in Argentina at the present time, revenues" are at the root of the
many more than the slow sea evil. To a greater or less extent,
freighter can possibly serve ade- according to the individual college.
quately. It now seems to have come alumni are in fact so eager to win
to the airplane to be the ways and that "they are quite willing to shut
means of a new and more efficient their eyes to very discreditable hap-
trade handclasp between the old penings which reflect sadly upon
and the new world. their own colleges in a way which
Said contemporaries after the no series of victories on the athletic
flight: "It remained for the Italians field can possibly overcome." Costs
to prove that argosies could ac- and revenues of football do consti-
complish the east-west passage as trte a "constant and justifiable
easily as single planes . . . and source of academic as well as pub-
South America will doubtless reflect lit criticism."
the result of this gallant and suc- Football on Morningside Heights,
cessful effort." because it is big-city football, is
Every step in modern aviation has further advanced toward being a
meant a shortening of the gap be- mere spectacle than at many an-
tween nations of the world, a other university, and-while Prince-
shrinkage of the old earth which ton is in no position to cast the
has become smaller with each day's first stone -it will be recalled that
achievements during the past five Columbia was not whitewashed by
years. It has remained for Italy, the Carnegie report of a year ago.
however, to score a knockout blow. On these accounts, too, Dr. Butler

I would like to have you voice the theme must be ethical although
i complaint for me about these not necessarily Biblical. They must
uys- that fight with coeds over the be non-sectarian.
yoeds' books. My whole day was Plays should be accompanied by
wuined today by seeing a begoggled a sealed and attached envelope con-
:itwit blocking the way in front I taining the name and address of
>f Angell Hall while struggling with the author, together with sufficient
a buxom and healthy looking postage to cover first class regis-
wench. He was maintaining in a tered mail. They should be sent =
oud voice that the small volume to the State center (whoseaddress
which she carried on her left arm may be received from Longmans,
was much too heavy for her. If Green in New York). Plays must
Such things go on, no wonder the be submitted before March 31.
meds are not human. Fo'r my part The winning manuscripts will be
;oeds are ot1humanr or myCp.r
[ should enjoy seeing a few of them played first in Cincinnati and pos-
.ielping some of our aenemic look- sibly later in New York (n either
rng frosh. case subject to the merit of the
Yours for Bigger and Better Milk- play) and regular royalties will be
shakes. Morpone. payed. The plays will also be pub-
l ished by Longmans, Green the au-
* thors retaining all royalty rights
Dear Morpone: in addition to receiving cash a-
Consider your complaint as wards.
voiced, second, and thoid. In For further information address
short, I feel the same way, al- Longmans Green, Play Department,
though you omitted to mention 55 Fifth Avenue, New York City.
the fact that there ought to be "Domnei" Illustrated by Pape.
a law against coeds carrying For nearly ten years Frank C.
books anyway. Obtaining sym- Pape, artist royal to the Kingdom
pathy under false pretenses or of Poictesme, has illustrated suc-
something. cessive books by James Branch Ca-
Very sincelery yours and a rasher bell. His reputation was made with
>f bacon, D. Baxter. the illustrating of "Jurgen" in
* England when that book was ban-
FRONT PAGE NIFTIES ned by the censor here. Within a
"This simple ruse is said to have few days of publication that book
;reatly discouraged the practice o: was commanding a heavy premium
shipping unsought gods to farmers,' in the bookshops of London. The
ire the immortal words which fin- illustrated gift edition of DOMNE3
.sh off the delightful little feature is published by Robert M. McBride
which appears on the front page o' & Company.
me of the Ann Arbor Morning Louise Bogan Wins Poetry Prize.
Papers. In awarding to Louise Bogan the
And very rightly too, I think. John Reed Memorial Prize of $100,
Nothing revolts me more than the magazine Poetry emphasizes
the idea of anyone shipping an the fact that the award is to be
unsought god to a farmer. regarded as a tribute to the high
* * * distinction of her work, not only
Dear Dan: in Poetry but in her published vol-
Have you noticed that one of our umes of verse, the best known of
I aicest campus bookstores (adv.) which is BODY OF THIS DEATH.
.ahas a sign saying Timely Study of Willa Cather.
FINE BINDINGS Now that Willa Cather has been
1 Off awarded the Howells Medal fort
Bert and Freddie Bobbsey. fiction by the American Academy
of Arts, every step in her rise to
Yes, and they also offer Mod- national recognition is interesting. i
ern Readers for 88c. Those who wish a brief yet com-
r fr 8c prehensive study of her work will
Dear Danny: find a valuable guide in Rene Ra-
Now that the semester is draw- pin's WILLA CATHER, recently is-
.ng to a close and finals are ap- cued by Robert M. McBride & Coi-
roaching, I supposenyouare won- pany. This book seems to be the
Iering what you'll do when the only volume devoted to an exten-
grades come in. It pains me to have sive critical study of all Miss Cath-
you worry about things like that er's works, as well as her contribu-
so I've fixed it up with Mr. Kranich tions to periodicals. M. Rapin also
3o you can have your old job back lists the essays which have been
at the cement works carrying out written on Miss Cather and her
the bags. Your Uncle William told books.
--- r-'- '--u - ----T h If

r_ _ 'fl ~ tii ~~t~iTn4Y. i
" O le~

,. - .

Cor
D

FIRST METHODIST METHODIST STUDENTS FIRST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH CENTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
S. State and E. Washington Sts. WESLEYAN GUILD Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
r. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Cor. State and East Huron Women.
.1iA xA n4 _ M4i"P M '1V1UinIL < M O W iL.

i

10:30

A. M.--Morning
"EXISTENCE"
Dr. Fisher.

Worship.

7:3

0 P. M.--Evening
"PICTURESQUE JA

Illustrated lecture by Rev.
Coleman of Tokyo, Ja

Worship.
kPAN"
Horace E.
pan.

12.00 Noon-Regular Sunday School
Classes.
6:00 P. M.-Prof. George E. Car-
rothers will speak on "The
Master's Challenge to Youth."
7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

0:4" Y. .-Morning orship.
Sermon: "Changing Christianity
and the Unchanging Christ."
2:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Speaker: Prof. C. S. Yoakum.
6:30 P. M.-Graduate, Professional
and Business Young People's dis-
cussion group.

)

I :

THE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister
i. Students.

of

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
11:15 A. M.-Religious Service.
Address by Rabbi Heller. Subject:
"Mission of Religion and Science."
7:30 P. M-Student Forum. Paper
by Herman Pekarsky. Subject:
"The Right To Be."
9:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

9:45 A. NI.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Worship and Sermon.
Mr. Sayles will preach. Topic:
"The Recovery of Appreciation."
12:00 N.-University Students' class
meets at Guild House. Mr. Chap-
man. Closes at 12:40.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour.
6:30 P. M.-Devotional and Dis-
cussion meeting.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.--Bible School.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
January 11, 1931
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Creative Living."
9:45 A. M.-Church School.
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship so-
cial half hour.
6:00 P. M.-Fellowship supper.
6:30 P. M.-Mr. Heaps will pre-
sent Sutton Vane's drama, "Out.
ward Bound," illustrated with col.
ored slides.
ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.--Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall).
9:30 A. M.-Church School (Kin.
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer, ser-
mon by Mr. Lewis.
6:30 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall.
7:45 P. M.--Evensong and Address.

I I

!.

BE
CONSIS TEN T
IN YOUR
RELIGION
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARI X

10:00 A.
Sermon:
Christ."

M.-Morning Worship.
"Bringing Others to

11:00 A. M.--'Service in German.
6:30 P. M.--Young People's Sup.
per.

I

7:00 P. M. - Young
League meeting.

People's

a
t
h
tE
a
ii
u
fc
s-
a
tc
s
fw

ae you've been doing that at fra- i a Iiiorenguins.
ernity parties but he laughed when C he r r y Kearton, distinguished
eo said it-maybe he was fooling. British naturalist, traveler a n d
Anyhow, if by any chance you writer, has just returned from Pen-
o pull through, I have thought up gum Island. This piece of rock and
little plan that ought to help you sand, four miles square, lies south
o your quiz sections next semester. of Cape Horn, and Mr. Kearton
lhen the instructor calls on you calls it the eighth wonder of the
or the first time just say, "I-I-I y- world. Human beings are not al-
-yam n-n-not sh-sh-sh-sh-shure, lowed in this giant community of
-s-s-s-sir!" and you'll be surprised five million penguins, and it was
t the result. The younger instruc- only after a good deal of persua-
ors will look uncomfortable, the sion that Mr. and Mrs. Kearton
lder faculty men will look at you were permitted by the South Afri-I
ympathetically, and all of them can Government to spend fivel
'ill make mental notes not to call months with these almost human

1'-

.1

,

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Bible Class.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Service.
5:30 P. M.-Student Forum.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Sacrament."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening
testimonial meeting.

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
January 11, 1931
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"Jesus Satisfies."
6:00 P. M.-Student Fellowship.
6:30 P. M.-Students Supper.

11

11

ill

11 11 11 11

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan