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January 09, 1931 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-09

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PAGE EIGHT

TIAE MICI-JIGAN DAILY

PRID , Y, JANUARY 9, 190"T

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THE MIChIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 19~1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the
President until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a. m. Saturday.
VOL. XLI. FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1931 NO. 74

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NOTICES
President and Mrs. Ruthven will be at home from 4 t: 6 o'clock on
the first two Sunday afternoons of each month to members of the
faculties, their friends, and other residents of Ann Arbor.
Committee of the Senate on Ufvcrsity Affairs: The next meeting
of this committee will be on Monday, January 19, at 4:15 p. in. Any
communications should be addrep .ed to the secretary, at 253 West
Engineering Building. Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary.
University Loan Commttee will meet on Thursday, January 15, at
1:30 p. m., in Room 2, University Hall.
Students who have fled apufjtations with the Office of the Dean of
Students should call at that cii-ce for an appointment with the Com-
mittee. J. A. Bursley, Chairman.
Detroit Symphony Orchestra Concert: The Detroit Symphony
Orchestra, under the baton of Bernardino Molinari, guest conductor,
will provide the seventh Choral Union program, Monday night, January
12, at 8:15 o'clock in Hill Auditorium. The public is respectfully re-!

MCaLILUM NAMES
'LIT iEr PATRiONS
10S ,"T1END J'HOP
Presient Ruthven and Regents
Head Sponsors for Junior
Class Dance.
LARGE NUMBER LISTED
Deans, Professors, Other Faculty
Members and Wives Complete
G oup of Patrons.
Patrons for the 1932 J-Hop, to
be held Feb. 13 in the Intramural
gynnarium, were announced yes-
terdeay by Kenneth McCallum, gen-
eral ch airman.
Those listed as patrons and pa-
tronesses for the Hop are: Presi-
dent Alexander G. Ruthven and
Mrs. Alexander G. Ruthven, Regent
Junius E. Beal and Mrs. Beal, Re-
gent William L. Clements, Regent
Esther M. Cram and Mr. Cram,

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quested to come sufficiently early as to be seated on time and detach Regent Lucius L. Hubbard, .Regent
before leaving home, coupon No. 7 and present it for admission. James. O. Murfin and Mrs. Murfin,
The program is as follows-- Mendelssohn: Fingal's Cave; Brahms: Regent R. Perry Shorts and Mrs.
Excerpts from "Giulietta e Romeo." Shorts, Regent Walter Sawyer, Re-
r r G im gent Ralph Stone and Mrs. Stone,
Sonata Recital: Wassily Besekirsky, violinist, and Mabel Ross Rheadand Superintendent of Public In-
struction Webster H. Pearce and
pianist, will give a sonata recital Sunday afternoon, December 11, at Mrs. Pearce.
4:15 o'clock in Lydia Mendelssohn Auditorium, to which the general l Others are: Dean Henry M. Bates
public is invited without admission charge. They will play Ce~ir Franck and Mrs. Bates, Dean' J. A. Bursley
Sonata and Sonata Op. 18 of Richard Strauss. and Mrs. Bursley, Dean John R.
The public is respectfully requested to be seated on time. Effinger and Mrs. Effinger, Dean
Samuel T. Dana and Mrs. Dana,
Faculty Bibliography: All faculty members who have not returned Dean J. B. Edmondson and Mrs.
to the Graduate School the reports on bibliography will please do so at Edmondson, Dean C. E. Griffen
once. G. Carl Huber, Dean. and Mrs. Griffen, Dean Wilbur R.
Humphreys and Mrs. Humphreys,
University Bureau of Appointments and Occupational Information: Dean Carl Huber and Mrs. Huber,
Students interested in securing permanent positions (except teaching) Kraus, Dean Alice Lloyd, Dean Al-
after .graduation in February or June may register at 201 Mason Hall, fred H. Lovell and Mrs. Lovell, Dean
today. Hours for registration, 9:00 to 12:00 and 2:00 to 4:30. This is H. C. Sadler and Mrs. Sadler, Dean
the last week for registration. Fred B. Wahr and Mrs. Wahr, Dean
--- Marcus L. Ward and Mrs. Ward,
Householders: Householders having rooms for men students avail- Vice-president S. W. Smith and
able for the second semester are requested to list them in the Office of Mrs. Smith, and Vice-president C.
the Dean of Students, Room 2, University Hall, at once. Dial 6115. S. Yoakum and Mrs. Yoakum.
Available light-housekeeping rooms and apartments should also bot, Prof. Henry Adams and Mrs.
be listed. F. B. Wahr, Assistant Dean. Adt, Prof. H ,nW. Aams and Mrs.
Adams, Prof. S. W. Allen and Mrs.
-~~~Allen, Prof. Dow Baxter, Prof. Ar-
To All Men Students: Students intending to change their rooms at thur Bromage and Mrs. Bromage,
the end of the present semester are hereby reminded that according to Prof. Robert Craig, Prof. Arthur L.
the University Agreements they are to inform the householders of such Cross, Prof. Paul Cuncannon, Prof.
intention at least two weeks prior to the close of the semester, that is Ernest Fisher and Mrs. Fisher, Prof.
by Jan. 30. It is advised that notice of such intention to move be made Clifford C. Glover and Mrs. Glover,
at once. F. B. Wahr, Assistant Dean. Pref.Charles Griffits and Mrs.
______ Griffits, Prof. Evan's Holbrook and
EVENTS TODAY Mrs. Holbrook, Prof. Harry Kipke
EVENTSTODAYand Mrs. Kipke, Prof. Emil Lorch
Zoology Lecture: Professor E. M. East, of Harvard University, will and Mrs. Lorh, Prof. Paul A. Leidy
give the following lecture under the auspices of the Department of and Mrs. Leidy, Prof. C. J. Lyons-
Zoology; 4:15 p. m.-"The Self-Sterility Problem." Room 2116, Natural and Mrs. Lyons, Prof. Richard Lid-
Science Building. dicoat and Mrs. Liddicoat, Prof.

HIGHLIGHTS OF
BRZUCKER TALKI

(BY Associatd IPress)
A "legislative holiday" from
non-essential laws.
Repeal of act forbidding state
participation in " bridge and
grade separation work in cities
over 16,000.
Gradual abolition of t h e
township as a road-building
unit and assumption of burden
by state and counties.
Modification of the covert act,
for bettersprotection of prop-
erty owners.
Classification of c o n t r a c t
truck carriers w i t h common
carriers.
Periodic re-registration of
motor vehicle drivers as safety
measure.
Equalization and downwardj
revision of state salaries.
Reduction of burdens on gen-
eral property tax.
Repeal of the malt tax.
Relief for the poorer school
districts from some other source
than the general property tax.
Extension over a period of
four years of the institutional
building program for the com-
ing biennium, with reduction of
general property tax by $3,500,-
000 a year for next two years.
Classification of occupational
diseases as compensable injur-
ies under workmen's compen-
sation law.
Removal of inconsistencies
and incongruities from election
General rod license tax for
fishermen.1
Establishment of the grand
jury as a permanent institution
in the crime-detection system.
State aid in trunk line widen-
ings in cities.
Detni:on o "racketeering"
and fixing a penalty for it.
GOVERNOR BRUCKER OPPOSES:
Increasing the motor vehicles
taxes.
Diversion of any part of mot-
or vehicle revenues for local
use.{
Creation of non-essential new
offices.
Addition of any burden to the
general property tax.
OTHER SUBJECTS:
Old Age Pensions: "Any meas-
ure you adopt nmust carry its
own revenue-raising provisions."
Tax Inquiry Commission's Re-
port-."It is entitled to analy-
sis." Majority and minority re-
ports on income tax- "Both
should be seriously weighed."
Veenker, Prof. Charles Vibbert and
Mrs. Vibbert, Prof. Merven H. Wa-
terman and Mrs. Waterman, Prof
Fielding H. Yost and Mrs. Yost.
Mrs. Beryl F. Bacher, Dr. William
Bishop, Franklin Cappon and Mrs
Cappon, Dr. Frederick Coller anc
Mrs. Coller, Kenneth Doherty and
Mrs. Doherty, Richard C. Fuller anc
Mrs. Fuller, Dr. Milton S. Gold-
hamer and Mrs. Goldhamer, Hard3
Hoover and Mrs. Hoover, Donalc
C. Horton and Mrs. Horton, J. Ger-
ald Kronick, Dr. A. B. Loveman
Elmer D. Mitchell and Mrs. Mitch-
ell, Dr. Maurice R. McGarvey and
Mrs. McGarvey, Dr. F. G. Novy and
Mrs. Novy, Miss Jeanette Perry
Charles A. Sink and Mrs. Sink
Burton Thuma and Mrs. Thuma.
Lewis Vander Velde, Arthur Van
Duren jr. and Mrs. Van Duren.
ROUEN, France.- Mademoiselle
Juliette Billard, first woman to be
admitted to the French National
School of Architecture, designed
and organized the entire monster
pageant which will take place here
on May 31, 1931, in honor of the
fifth centenary of Joan of Arc.
WANT ADS PAY!

GENETIC PROBLEMS
'DISCUSSED BY EAST
Influence on Career of Nation
by Small Group Described
in Professor's Talk.
"The pattern of a country's career
is set by the small group of higher
minds," said Prof. E. M. East, of
Harvard University, speaking here
yesterday on "Heredity and Hum an
Problems."
"No man is likely to attain emi-
nence without high innate abil-
ity," Professor East remarked.
"Since ability is explained princi-
pally through heredity, the geneti-
cist has a novel approach to sociol-
ogy that is founded on a sound
scientific basis," he pointed out.
The fundamental characteristics
of the individual are determined by
heredity, though proper heredity
and proper environment are both
necessary to the growth of a genius,
Professor East said. Recognition oft
the facts known to genetic science(
would consequently alter our socialc
attitudes in many cases.
"We must relinquish the old
Jeffersonian philosophy," he said.
Equality of individuals is not real;
and belief in it brings such falla-
cies as teaching all school children
iccording to the same plan. "ItI
would be sounder policy," he said,
'to give a child all he can assimi-
late of the kind of education he
needs."
3 Psychiatric clinics, already used
in connection with some criminal
courts, should be expanded to ar
wider range, Professor East said.
They could conduct regular exam-2
inations of children, and would bec
aids in fitting people into proper(
occupations, as well as in detecting1
dangerous insanity.
State marriage laws are in at
chaotic condition, and divorce laws1
even more so, he pointed out. Modi-
fication of immigration laws to
raise the standard of immigrants
1 by intelligence testingdis also an
important need, he said.
Chinese Club to Hear
Brown Lecture Tonight+
Members of the Chinese students'
club will hear Prof. E. S. BrownI
speak of "China in Transition" at <
8:30 o'clock tonight in Lane hall.<
Election of club officers for the sec-
ond semester will be held immedi-
ately preceding the address.+
A student of constitutional gov-j
ernment and always interested in
the affairs of a national life, Pro-I
essor Brown spent his recent sab-l
)atical year on a world tour study-
ng political conditions in variousI
countries.]

READING SEEKS
INDIAN LIBERTY

Associated Press Photo
Lord Reading,
Spokesman for the liberal party
in England who urged a plan at
the round table conference in Lon-
don that virtually amounted to a
dominion government for India.
DEITROIT TO OFFR[
AUTOMOBILE 11SHO'W

The Union's past fiscal year was
most satisfactory, says Prof. Evans
Holbrook, '93, '95, '00L, financial
secretary of theUnion, in the cur-
rent issue of the Alumnus. The
figures prepared by the official au-
ditors show a profit of $4,148.35 for
the 12 month period, as compared
to a loss of $250.61 for the preced-
ing year.
"But the most satisfying feature
of the report," he says, "is the hope
for the wiping out of the indebted-
ness which has been the bugbear of
the Union's existence. Only a few
years ago this Michigan student
club, the pride of undergraduates
and alumnus alike, owed almost
half a million dollars. Steadily this
am :unt has been whittled down."
Figures revealed last August that
the mortgage had been cut from
$200,000 to $50,000. Since then the
amount has been reduced to $20,-
000. Current notes payable repre-
sent $34,000 more, and the state
war board loan now stands at $52,-
193.33, with accrued interest of
$41,629.32.
"The current notes are practically
the cost of the additions made dur-
ing the past summer in the student
offices and the cafeteria," writes
Professor Holbrook. He explains
that the loan from the state war
board was contracted in 1917-18 in
order to rush the Union to comple-
tion so that it might be available
for the S A T C.
Professor Holbrook points out
that during the past year the
Union paid student employees a
total of $50.301.47. Of this total,
$23,000, was paid back by students
in payment for meals.

With the mammoth
show in New York, the

automobile
first of the

great automobile expositions of the
year, now drawing to a successful
close, widespread attention is being
directed to Detroit, where, fromi
Jan. 17 to Jan. 24, the latest and
most astounding accomplishments
of the automotive industry will be
exhibited.
The automotive achievements,
taking the forms of gargantuan
limousines, dwarfed roadsters, and
cars of all the intermediate sizes
and shapes, will be displayed in
Convention hall where an army of
decorators and electricians are
about to begin their annual job
of converting the huge building
into a setting worthy of the two
million dollars worth of cars and
equipment to be exhibited.
Jan. 21 will be known as Michi-
gan day at the show. On that day,
the Michigan Automotive Trade
association, representing the retail
automobile trade of the state, will
hold its eleventh annual convention
at the Book-Cadillac hotel with
Governor Wilbur M. Brucker as the
principal speaker at the banquet of
the state dealers that night. The
tradesmen will also be addressed
by Judge Alfred J. Murphy, of the
third judicial district, Frank D.
Fitzgerald, secretary of state, and
Mayor Frank Murphy of Detroit.

Orders executed on ol ex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.

English 45-Section 2 (1L W. fletherington): This section will meet
as usual in 5005 A. H., but on and after Wednesday, January 14, will
neet in 1121 N. S.
W. A. A. Board picture v il be taken at Speddings, at 12:00 noon.
Nippon Club: Will meet at Lane Hall, Friday, at 3:30 p. m.
Senior Ball Committee meets at Rentschler's Studio at 12:30 p. m.
for 'Esian picture. Members of this committee should get in touch
with the chairman, Vinal O. Taylor, before the above date. Phone 8717.

George McConkey and Mrs. Mc-
Conkey, Prof. E. V. Moore and Mrs.
Moore, Prof. William A. Paton and
Mrs. Paton, Prof. F. S. Peterson and
Mrs. Peterson, Prof. James Pollock
and Mrs. Pollock, Prof. Jesse Reeves
and Mrs. Reeves, Prof. Ralph A.
Sawyce and Mrs. Sawyer, Prof.
Burke Shartel and Mrs. Shartel,
Prof. John Tracy, Prof. George
Congr'egational Student Fellow-
ship: Meeting at 5:30 p. m. Sunday,

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January Clearance Sale
On Suits and Overcoats

-Sd a|in the church parlors. Rev. Heaps
Chinese Students: are reminded that the final and most important will present Sutton Vane's drama,
meeting of this semester for their Club will take place at 7:00 p. m. "Outward Bound," in a set of color-
at Lane Hall. Election of officers will be followed by an address by edi steroptican slides.
Professor Brown of the Political Science Department on "China in _--
Transition." DMichigan Dames are giving a

Many have been in and saved-Why not you?

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Ann Arbor Stamp Club meets in room 408 of the Romance Languages
Building at 8:00 p. m. Dr. Howard Lewis of the Medical school will
speak on the stamps of Crete, and exhibit his collection of the same,
Everyone interested is invited to attend.
COMING EVENTS
Women's Education Club will meet on Monday, January 12, at 4:151
p. m., in Women's Athletic Building. The program will consist of a
model interview with a prospective teacher. The speaker will be Supt.
Haisley of the Ann Arbor High School.

party Saturday, Jan. 10, at 8:30
,. m. for husbands and wives, at
Palmer Field House, corner of North
University and Forest ave. All mem-
bers and husbands are cordially in-
vited.
Monda y Evening Drama Section
of the Faculty Women's Club will
meet at the Michigan League, Jan-
uary 12, at 7:45.

Greys, Blues,
Browns, Ox fords
Greys and Combi-
nations. All wool,
hand tailored and
specially designed.

$21a .7 5

You save our profits
and in many cases
we lose money but
we must make room
for spring nerchan-
disc.

Values to $50

OVERCOATS CUT TO THE CORE-THREE GROUPS

$2850

Cosmopolitan Club: Discussion
meeting on Pan-Pacific Relations,
led by Prof. John B. Condliffe, Vis-
iting Professor of Economics, at 8
p. m.,'Saturday, at Lane Hall. Social
program following the discussion.4
Visitors welcome.
Independents expecting to attend
J-Hop meet at Union, Tuersday,
Jan. 13, at 7:30 p. m. in room 304.
Craftsmen: There will be an im-
portant meeting at the Masonic
Temple Saturday at 7:30 p. m.
Scabbard and Blade: Picture will
be taken at Dey's Studio at 1:30
on Saturday, January 10. Come in
uniform.

$30.
Values to $50

uslt Pubvlildshe d,

Tn9 Farst People of Michigan
BY DR. W. B. HINSDALE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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It's impossible to appreciate the price until you see the quality of these coats. They're
all made by Penn Hall which means complete satisfaction for you in every detail of style
and service. Sizes from 34 to 46.

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$1.50

All
Furnishings
20% Off

Alm

,+ ,a¢, ,+, J ;F ,
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Uroversity
Bookstore

213 East Liberty Street

111

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fi'=

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No= litimpli -

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Bob
Carson's

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Friday
And

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