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December 13, 1930 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-13

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1930

I

V

Published every morning except Monday
riug the University year by the Board in
nrtrol of Student Publications.
LMemnber of Western Con ference Editorial
5sociation.
'Ihe Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
etches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and the local news published
rein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
6 postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
laster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.0o; by mail, $4.1.o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
'treet. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAF Ut
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FRANK E. CoOPER, City Editor
Wews Editor ..............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ..........Walter W. Wilds
ports Editor ..............Joseph A. Russell
,omen's Editor ..........Mary L. Behymer
.usic. D~rama, Books.........Win. J. Gorman
ssistant City Editor.......Tarold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowi
relegraph Editor ..........George A. Staute'
copy Editor ..................Wri. E. iype'
fI NIGIIT 1I)ITORS

Campus Opinion OASTED ROLL
Contrilutors a e asked to be brief,
confidiing themsel'es to less than S00o UNCLE DAN
orsif possible. Anonymous cornm-
municatiens will be disregarddThe NCLI
names of communicants Nvill, however, HSLIPS L eare sc,,~~nii uo e
be regarded ais criential, upon reSER
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial "
opinion of The Daily. Dan "Suffragette" Baxter, a big
.___________buttercup buttercup and an old cream puff
SWEETNESS AND LIGHT if there ever was one-and we sus-
I pect there was-left his moorings
To the Editor: late last night and has not beenI
I hope you will pardon this in- heard from since. That leaves
trusion by a former hanger-on who quite a job for us to worry our pret-
has no malicious intentions, but ty head about, or we don't know
only desires to offer a little comfort our moorings, no, sir!
to the fretting freshman, P. S. '34.
The latter, after almost three whole
months of residence, has decided faithful to the departed's poli-
that "this year Michigan will gra- cies to the last gag, we make haste
ciously bestow with fitting cere- to present a new game to the play-
mony meaningless sheepskin rolls boys among the Rolls public:
upon 1500 spoonfed individuals."
GAME

& MEMI

M SIC AND DRAM A
-

hI. .11

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JOSE ITURB
PR()GRIA:
Sonata in A laior, No. o ............. Mozart
XValtz
'x)ii Etm~t............ ............. hp,
Polonaise
Balade in l) .\Iaioi
Rhapsody ill iw........ .......... iam
L'lle jl p ..............................1)'usI
NavarraA.....n....................... Albc
Spriual av lin:,!r t So nc
t4 altz ................................. iu i
Lie] es'ran-...........................Li t
Preliidu.s...........................Dehlusr
Itsa at n . cer -... . . . .. . . . - .B c
A Review.
By his last splendid encore-the
third movement of Bach's Italian
Concerto-Jose Iturbi had showed
himself splendidly adaptable, with
he one exception of Beethoven, to
all the central phases of piano Lit-
rature: from Bach, through Moz-
art, to Schumann, Chopin, Brahms.
Debussy, Albeniz and the American
spiritual and Blues. That fact alone
.s abundant evidence of an major
Pianistic talent.
The qualities that characterized
his performance of the Mozart A
'Vajor Sonata were perhaps subtly
3resent throughout the recital. He
lad, what is to me, the consum-

WEST LIBERTY STREET
Westinghouse
Refrigerators
and Radios
STANGER
FURNITURE Co.

III

Il

III

Branch No.

2

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13
Roses for the Ladies

Phone 4191

We Call for and Deliver

ANNOUNCING THE
Formal Opentng
of Our Kash and Karry
1119 South University

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
)avid M. Nic iol

jolin ). Reindel
Rhard L. Tobin
Darold 0. Warren

SPORTS AsSisTANTs
Sheldon C. Fuilerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Robert Townsend
REPOIRTERS
E. Bush Wilbur J. Meyers
homas M. Cooley Robert L. Pierce
Morton Frank Richard Racine
Saul Friedherg Jerry E. Rosenthal
Frank B. Gilbreth Gieorge Rubenstein
Jack Goldsmith " (aharn A. Sanford
Roland Goodman Earl Seiffert
Morton Helper Robert F. Shaw
Edgar Ilornik LEdwin Pd. Smith
James 11. Inglis George A. Stauter
-Denton C. Kunze John S. Townsend
Powers Moulton Robert I). Townsend
Eileen Blunt Mary McCall
Elsie Feltman Margaret O'Brien
Ruth Gallmeyer Ileanor Rairdon
SEmily G. Grimes Anne Margaret Tobin
Elsie M. offimeyer Margaret Thompson
Jean Levy Claire Trussell
Dorotny Magee Barbara Wright
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 212[4
T. HOLLISTER IABLEY, Business Manager
KAsPER H. HALVrRSoN, Assistant Manager
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertising................Charles T. Klint
Advertising.......... .W...Thomas M. Davis
Advertising;............ William W. Warboys
Service..................Norris J. Johnson
Publitation ............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation............... Marvin S. Kobackei
Accounts .................homas S. Mtir
Business Secretary............ Mary J. Kenan

II

}
c
r

I plead guilty to holding one of
these despised shingles, and prob-
ably had my share of "stale theor- c
3ms and rotted facts." Fashions of V
other years would suggest that s
probably the best place for anb
aspiring freshman to learn respect t
for his University is on the other a
end of a moving paddle. Such things n
have happened. But in submission '
to the new, enlightened doctrines, I
the Class of '34, will have to be con-
tent with its lot and leave to 8t
o'clocks, Ann Arbor weather and
Waldo Abbot the job of teaching
it sweetness and light. After threes
more years of spoonfeeding, your p
youthful radical may learn that a
proper desire will discover eagert
teachers for itself. Michigan has a
curious habit of rewarding those
who honor her, and of bestowing r
a priceless happinessupon thoseI
who love her. If her degree isI
'meaningless," may the shades ofa
Tappan and Angell have mercy on
the soul of him who thinks so.
Incidentally, The Daily tells usa
of the provinces, that the StudentI
council has banned fraternity par-E
ties on the night of the J-Hop, and
that the usually apologetic inter-I
fraternity council has threatenedX
its non-paying members with social
probation and restriction of rushing
privileges. You might relieve your
less enlightened readers by telling
them that neither body has thef
power to carry out its threats, since
these matters lie within the juris-
diction of the Senat'e committee on
Kudent affGai.s.
Kenneth G. Patrick, '29.

Nothing is needed by the parti-
ipant but some bottles of Shino-
Varnisho or whatever the stuff you
ee advertised so much is, and z
bit of savoir-faire. A helpful
hough not necessary, accessory is
a moustache such as the one the
man in the ads has. You enter an3
residence, demand a kettle of boil-
ng water from the lady who greet:
you, and explain what you intend
to demonstrate.
You then put Shino-Varnisho or
the nicest table-top available an(
spread in with neatness and dis-
patch and a rag. Pour water copi-
ously; and if it ruins the wood
laugh.

e
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"The Home
CHAS. H. SCHROEN
209 South 4th Avenue
Kash and

Garment Cleaning
Company.
r.,

of E n erin.e
EWRIN SCHROEN
705 North University

Karry Bargains

p' '

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Harry R. Beglev
Vernon Bishop
Robert Calla han
William W. Davis
Richard 1. HMiller
Miles H-oisington

Assistants
File Kightlinger
Don W. Lyon
William Morgan
Richard Strateieier
Keith Tyler
Noel D. Turner
Byron C. Vedder

Ann W. Verner Sylvia Miller
Marian Atran rtieii Ujsi
Helen Bailey Mildred Postal
Tosephine Convisser Marjorie Rough
Maxine Fishgrnnd glary E. Watts
Dorothy LeMire Johanna Wiese
Dorothy Laylin

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1930
Night Editor-DAVID M. NICHOL
CRAMMING AGENCIES
Michigan is fortunate in no'
being dominated by a tutoring
school as is the case in many prom-
inent universities in the country
Students at Princeton and Yale, for
example, have access to tutorinE
agencies that are so efficient thai
they have the reputation of "spot
ting" a large majority of the ex-
aminations given during the year
These agencies practically guaran-
tee, for a stipulated sum, to mak.
it possible for a student to pass any
course in which he may need assist
ance.
It is gratifying to note that nc
agency in Ann Arbor has the repu-
tation of having such efficiency
However, if such an agency existec
there can be little doubt but that
hundreds of students at this tim(
of the year would sacrifice thei!
week's allowance for a supply o
canned knowledge.
It should be the effort of every
department in the University to
discourage attempts on the part of
the students to rely on a system
which inevitably results in intellec-
tual laziness. To discourage such
practices, certain departments at
specified times offer review lecture:
which tie up the semester's work.
Others advise students to seek
assistance, at a reasonable length
of time before the finals, from a
reliable faculty member in the de-
partment concerned. This is one of
the best means of obtaining reliable
and efficient preparation for exam-
inations, and is one which is based
on fairness to the student and de-
partment.
There are certain courses on the
campus which offer every advan-
tage to the student who desires to
"cram" and take chances on a final
blue book. These courses are the
ones that offer practically the same
examinations year after year with
very little variation in the subject
matter. Lecture courses having no

GARGOYLE
Why not place the blame for the
Cargoyle rot where it belongs? The
attention of the administration and
he chairman of the committee in
,ontrol of student publications had
een called to the cover page of
,he December number. But what
lid they do about it?
Their attitude seemed to be," it
aas been. printed and a lot of
money has been spent, so we can't
stop its sale and lose all that
:Honey, even though it is sacrili-
;ious."
There was a time when the Gar-
;oyle was a college humor maga- ;
;ine, but because of the degenerate
ninds that have been appointed to
,dit it and because of the lack of
abdominal capacity" of the facul-
,y members of the committee of the
>oard in control of student publi-
:ations, it has become a "cess pool
>f literature and art," as one citizen
;alled it.
There is no room on the campus
or a publication whose nearly
;very joke or cartoon has an ob-
,ious dirty or suggestive meaning,
ven though it "pays." No commer-
Jal magazine would dare publish
he rot the Gargoyle has, except
Tim Jam Gems, and that lot, but
perhaps the Gargoyle has faculty
anction, and so can "get away
with it."
Alumnus.
>--o
Editorial Comment
COURTESY AND APPLE POLISH
(The Daily Nebraskan.)
The average student is so des-
perately afraid that someone will
accuse him of trying to get a "drag"
with a professdr that he ignores
one of the best opportunities to
educate himself. He denies himself
the profitable pleasure of chatting
with his various instructors for
fear that his profestors and fellow
students will misunderstand his in-
tentions.
Faculty members, as a rule, are
rather human. Some may have
t h e i r glaring eccentricities, but
many are good-hearted souls, anx-
ious to help their individual charges}
along. They have time for personalI
talks with students, but the caut-
ious students are too shy to crossI
the dividing line.{

SCORING
If lady of house laughs too,
points. If you get outside alive, 10
points. If you get outside dead,
penalized 15 points, and start all
over.
-* * *
We saw "Aw, Nuts" last night,s
and we'd even go so far as to re-r
view it for you, if the column due
east of this point hadn't gotten the
idea first. Several members of the
Rolls and editorial staffs are im-
plicated in the show and there is
also at least one representative of
what we used quaintly to term theI
"business" staff, before the depres-f
sion. That ought to be warning
enough for anyone.r
* * *
And while we're about it, here is
another picture of two of the boys
in costume during one of thei
highly dramatic moments over at
the Laboratory theatre.
* * *
. t
* * *
Reading from left to right, Elme
and Dan.
*
The M. I. P. A. lads and lassies
have just struck the office in
body, and, overcome, we make wa
for Brother Bert.
FREDDIE BOBBSEY.
Christmas being only a few
days away-you've heard about
Christmas, surely there is no
good excuse for not saying
something about it; at least we
can't think of any. Someone
has installed a Christmas tree
in the center of campus. It has
branches and some c o 1o r e d
lights on it. T h e campus
spreads out on all sides of it.
It's all pretty silly, anyway.
* * *
We may be an old softy, but just
the same we can't help getting
pretty much worked up over it all.
Last year, for instance, we worked
up to the third branch from the
top and fell off. People shouldn't
go home for Christmas vacation,
anyway.
* * S
But if you do you'll probably get
pretty bored enroute. We under-
stand that there's already a game
in this column, but then, Rolls is
always game to the end.
* * *
GAME
Get into bus. Take rear seat
and light cigarette. When bus
-has started, look around and
pick out seat nearer the front
that is empty. Close eyes and
try to find seat.
Lots of interesting complica-
tions can arise in this sport. If
you don't believe it, just try.
Scoring
Sitting in pretty girl's lap, 1'
point. Sitting in fat lady's lap,

mate equipment for Mozart. First of -
ill, a contented, even gracious,.I
sensibility necessary to complete
3ympathy with the Mozartean re-
gnement; and technically, the lucid
articulate style, crisp, cool and im-
,ersonal, employing nuances very
sparingly and avoiding the senti-
mental caress that can become in-
dissociable with a Mozartean phrase
by crystalline molding. From this
,are Mozartean combination of
-recision with insouciant ease came
dlear vivid music, now lyrical, now
delightfully laughing from the keys.
It was an exquisitely spirited per-
formance to open the recital with.
Turning from this cool classic
music to the glow and the musings
>f Schumann's impassioned fancy
-nearly at its best in the Etudes
Symphoniques--Iturbi seemed no
less gifted. however, he is not a
different person. He does not be-
come what Schumann would per-
haps tempt him to: the tempestu-
'us performer sweeping an impres-
,ionable audience by violence and
she whole fund of romantic non-
sense. He is still an exacting artist
using his abundant technique to1
articulate the many felicities of
3chumann 's music. His incisiveness
;till maintained itself. He gave this
nvsic thematic and emotional co-
eerence. It is just possible that his
musical speech is not quite rich
enough, in color and nuance, to
;ive the superb performance of theI
Etudes Symphoniques. He seemed to
be too much the gentleman, emo-
tionally and technically, to possess
;he swank and impetuosity for
many sections. But it was undoubt-
wdly a major performance.
His Chopin, I think, was negligi-
ble. It was good but not striking.
The two Brahms numbers, both of
ahem quite unpianistic and hardly
bearing their meanings on the sur-
face, were perhaps the best test on
;he recital for his musical intelli-
gence. His interpretations brought
meanings to the light in a coher-
ent, articulate whole. The two De-
bussy numbers played during the
evening were surprisingly spirited
and lucid; Mr. Iturbi was very
sensitive to Debussy's vaporous im-
pressionism without abandoning
his intelligence to it which resulted
in very distinguished and original
performances. In the "Navarra" of
his countryman Albeniz, Iturbi was
particularly keen to the music's
rythmic fluidity and its startlingj
color changes.
And then, closing his program
with a warm, if gentlemanly, fam-
iliarity with America's jazz idiom.
It was a bold and delightful stroke
to close an evening that certainly
revealed to Ann Arbor a new genius
among the younger pianists.
W. J.G.

0

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"MODERN HARVESTS" by Dr.
Fisher.
(Reception of new members)
4:15 P. M.-"THE MESSIAH,"
Hill Auditorium by University
School of Music.
There will be no evening service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEYAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 Noon-Regular Sunday School
Classes.
6:00 P. M.-Christmas Meeting led
by the Kappa Psi girls of Wes-
leyan Guild.
Social Hour at 7 o'clock.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
11:15 A. M.-Chanukah Service.
Address: "When Jew Meets
Greek." Rabbi Bernard Heller.
7:30 P. M.-Forum. Address: Mr.
M. Sostrin. Followed by student
discussion.
9:00 P. M.-Social hour and tea.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Gospel fox Gray
Days."
12:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Speaker: Prof. George E.
Carrothers.
6:30 P. M.-Graduate, Professional
and Business Young People discus-
sion group on "Teachings of Jesus
concerning properity."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
December 14, 1930
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic "The Gospel of the
Second Mile."
5:30 P. M.--Student Fellowship so-
cial half hour.
6:30 P. M.-Fellowship Program.

li

9:45 A. M.--The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Sermon by Mr. Sayles,
topic, "OVERCOMING."
192:00N.-The University students
class at Guild House. Mr. Chap-
man.
5:30 P. M.---All students of the
group and their friends are in-
vited to the social hour.
6:30 P. M.--Miss Berpeice Backus
will lead the meeting, speaking on
"The Spirit of the Y. W. Confer-
ence at Lake Geneva."

I

Readings
Director
Theatre.

by Miss Amy Loomis,
of Lydia Mendelssohn

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71

BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Four.th Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Blessing of the New
Covenant."
11:00 A. M.-Service in German.
7:00 P. M. - Young People's
League.

1!1
THEOSOPHY -
Offers a philosophy which renders
life intelligible, and which demon-
strates the justice and love which
guide its evolution.
STUDY IT
The Theosophical Society meets
Wednesday evenings in the Michigan
League at S o'clock. You are wel-
come.

71

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall.)
9:30 A. M.-Church School (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer; ser-
mon by Mr. Mann.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper.
7:45 P. M.-Christmas Carol Serv-
ice Sung by the Student Choir.

f'

THE MESSIAH
Dr. Earl V. Moore, musical direc-
tor of the School of Music, will
lead the Choral Union, the student
symphony orchestra, and faculty
soloists in a presentation of Han-
del's "Messiah" in a faculty concert
in Hill Auditorium Sunday after-
noon at 4:15 o'clock.
The solo parts will be sung by
Laura Littlefield, a newcomer to
the faculty this season and a con-
cert artist of prominence in the
East; by Arthur Hackett, well-

11

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ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Sunday School.

'i

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F,

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "God the Pre-
server of Man."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.

l

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHUI(CH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor

10:30 A. M.-Advent Service. Ser-
mon topic: "The Mighty Messiah."

December 14, 1930
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.
1 1.nn dA NA A,.....:-~ yy_ .._ --

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