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December 10, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-10

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GE TWO

THE. MICHIGAN

DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1930

OWNWIN

niversity
ITTLE APPOINTED PO
ROUP TO FURTHER
orris Hall Made Into Studio
i 1928 Upon Request of
Band, Music School.
ABBOT DIREC'TS WORK
Six Programs Broadcast Each
Wmeek During Regular
School Year.
By Carl Forsythe
Broadcasting at the University,
although in its infancy, has taken
great strides since it was firs-t in-l
troduced in 1925 through an ar-1
rangemenm maw rv upwan jcw
Kraus, of the pharmacy college,
with Station WJR which was then Deanc
owned by the Jewett Radio corn- who in1
panyg developn
Dr. Clarence Coo; Little, then Michigan
president of the University, became a memb(
interested in the work and appoint- apponte
ed a broadcasting committee con- Little, tl
'listing of William D. Henderson, Iversity,t
director of the extension division,
Fielding H. Yost, Wilfred B. Shaw, ~~-
director of alumni relations, and
Dean Kraus. Prof. Waldo Abbot ,
of the English department, was in- -_
vited to be director of the work.I
Encounter Dit'ficulties.
It wasn't an easy matter to get 'MWhoop
started. The programs were first Wop
broadcast fromn the old Adelphi M'ende
room on the top floor of University Gcorgi,
hall which was used by the play Michig
production classes at that time as English.'
a class room. The room was litter- Mimes
ked with model sets, costumes, and Nuts"; 8
other articles found back stage in Wuert
theater houses. But perhaps the of the r.
most difficult hinderance to pro- en.
gress was the presence of mice.
There were hundreds of them in
Sthe adjoining room belonging to Fec
!Dr. Little, who used them in his on "La
experimentation work. o'clock,
The mice were not in cafes and guagesi
frequently took excursions into the bercle F
room~ next door where the radio Lectwu
artists were doing their best to en-on"t
tertain an invisible public. At the onllety
fend of each program, after the gley
control man: had thrown several u
hammers at the elusive mice, the Stul
ones taking part in the program Cot
were requested to carry the batter-
Iies, microphones, and control board Prf
down the four long flights of stairs 'School
in order to make room for the play
production classes. gopo
r o'ciocl
Programs Increase. Music al
'Since the inception of the broad- student,
casting the facilities and number progran
Iof programs have steadily increas- sity. Th
ed. In, 1928 the School of Music, Ryan, j:
the Varsity band, and the broad- the mu&
casting service united in a request public s(
that Morris hail, which had for- On t1
merly been the Catholic chapel, be from "S;
remodeled to take care of the needs Buttteri
of these organizations. "Cavalei
The request was, granted and un- Trovato7
der the direction of Ross T. Bittin- attend t
ger, of the architectural college, the-
studio was appropriately decorated. B1
Last year the University broad- 8
cast programs from the studio each
Saturday night for 28 weeks. This BRF
4year arrangements were, made by ROA1
Professor Abbot with Station WJR j RO
to broadcast six programs weekly.
Radio audiences throughout the LAN
country during the last few years B3
have heard many addresses by1

faculty men, the Varsity band, Glee
clubs, artists from the music school,
and music from the various proms
and class dances broadcast by lead- WE I
ing dance orchestras.WED

Bro adca sting
IRD H. KRAUS k'lTUAlOVCS
NSORED WORKSJIMITH9 III L!,c d1
Says Hall Might. be Converted}
:: ;a Into International House ,

Show

lit
/vev2t.opment

Since

1 92~5

I

Ann Arbor Stores
Will Open Evenings
E3tG ms in Ann ir will be
Openu evenings precediny3g Christ-
mas, it was statetl yterday.
MLemrber firms of the retail
m r--hants' orgaization have
approved plans for the antici-

FIRST L.-INK IN $100,000,000 CHAIN lqfUiU run
I FEPRESS LINERS IS EFFECTED IdJ IIIWI dUIIUULH
9''1FICRES0ELASE

Enrol'aient for North-Central
Prtivon Shows Over Fu
1Pcr.,Cent Increase.

' ,e. ... ..I

Edward H. Kraus,
of the College of Pharmacy,i
1925 took an interest in theI
ment of broadcasting on the
,n campus. Dean Kraus was
)er of the special committee
ed by Dr. Clarence Cook
"hen president of the U'ni.
to further this work.
'hat's Going n
THEATERS.
tic - Eddie Cantor in
Cee.,,
elssohn -- Kreutzberg and
dancers; 8:30 o'clock.
ian - George Arliss in "Old
- All-campus revue, "Aw
8:30 o'clock.
t-Zane Grey's "The Last
Duanes" with George O'Bri-
GENERAL.
h lecture-Prof. E. L. Adams
Poesie des Troubadors"; 4:15
room 103, Romance Lan-
building. Sponsored by the
Francais.
ire-Samuel V. Chamberlain
things"; 4:15 o'clock, west
Alumni Memorial hall.
eats to Present
ncert This Evening
James Hamilton, of the
of Music, v:,il present a
A students in a program at
k tonight in the: School of
zuditorium. A nunmber of the
;s appeared in the l.ast radio
n provided by the V_ iver-,
hey will be assisted by F. ank
r., a member of the stafi. f
sic division of the Ann Arbo_
chools.
'e programs will be arias
amson and Delila," "Madam
fly," "Le Nvozze di Figaro,"
,a Rusticana," and "Il
re." The public is invited to
the concert.
R IGHT SPOT
32 PACIKARD STREET
TODAY, 5:30 to 7:30
EADED VEAL CUTLETS
ST BEEF, GRAPE JELLY
)AST LOIN OFL PORK,
APPLE SAUCE
MlB CHOPS, ITALIENNE
IAKED IRISH SWEET
POTATOES
WILTED LETTUCE
OR
WAX BEANS
35c

for Foreign Students. paced Christn srufandx, witf.
Invstiaton te ossbiiIs 4, fthe daybi-fore Christmas,
Investigatin of thewposibreiainsopen until 9
of converting Lane hail into an o'c? 3ck , iaturdy, Monday and
international house for the ac-1 Tuesday rprecef An1 the holi day.
commnodation of foreign students is Soe ilcoea 'lc
going ahead rapidly, according to Wincdar~dstain the cdos-
Ira M. Smith, registrar of the Uni- ing hours of the stores will be
versity and one of the chief pro- distributed by the Chamber of
ponents of the international house I.Commerce.
plan here. - --_ _-__
A successful foreign student's H A A TO SPEAKI
hotel has been worked out in NewS
York City, one of only three such 1AT C UB MEETING
ventures in the United States. The!rsesothStdnChitaRilyEgnes akto e
association have been in comnmuni-y Supplemented by Debate.
catin wth te dree-lorof his J. A. H-eaman, chief engineer of
enterprise, andi hope to be gie the Grand Trunk railway system,
considerably by his experience. leis
institution houses 1,50 0 students will speak on "Some Pertinent
from 65 countries of the world. Aspects of Modern TIransportation"
In regard to the pimnary purpose at a meeting of fihe Transportation
of such a house at Michian. the club at 7:15 oclock tomorrow in
expert, H-arry Edmonds, writes as
follows:' room 1045, East Enginering build-
"It would be a pity to put an ing. The talk is to be illustrated
over amount of space into Iord 7n sxwith slides.
not leaving sufficient social spae , Tae jprograms will also include a
for the co-m11yfiiiiL of the group, debate by tour members of S,1igma
Some might consider the latter of Rho Tau, engineering stump speak-
secondary inmj)ortance, but irom er's society, psn the topic, "Rcsolv-j
our point of xiew here, it is funda-I ed: that the present Congres:;
mental." should enact legislation regulating
Aside from providing living guar- the transportation of Dasse-igers
ters and a place for social contact and freight in motor vehicles."
with students from other lands, the __________
international house in New York is
th eter of many activities of an Astronomy Prof essor'
international character. Students to Lecture at Elmira
gather frequently in small groups -_
to discuss world problems that par- Prof. Heber D. Curtis, head of the
ticularly interest them, astronomy department and observ-
The group life of the house cen- atory, will go to Elmira, N. Y., to-7
ters mainly around the informal morrow to lecture at Elmira col-
Sunday evening suppers. loge. His topic will be "Eclipses."I

i
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Enrolment in 1 th ll high+ s Qools of
? u§ £t Sw m' Y # th~e n1-ort-h central kor'illnof Mich-
,S ig.an,$in..ea e\\ ! per.centthis
yar according to a stt-,mont re-
s leased yesterday ?ay Prof George E.
4YCacrrothers, ofrh Sho of Edu-
} I0 cation., directorofth bureau of
sProf (.o : Carothes aa'col-
lected his stantc10'r't that
he will mk bfrete ctn
- of the '+h ",ho pii'Isi
'1Tue figur( 1i.o showthat the
avc, aZe-sa h i -; of. teachirs lhave
inea rj - ves< rinnnrnis
Inow$12 hcis2Gneth.
a xhe docd e oge term
heat tas oes,
beigo pen ci; >>' o ?iiraie
Adssociatcl Press Photo Iis- clearly o lo,,, y fluen'crese of
The first link in a $100,00C1,000 chain of express liners for Lhe United almost 0ero to th ttl
States Mec hant marine was effected wzhen Senators Jones, White, and aon xedd:tuh o h
Morrow shot the first rivets into the keel of the first 30,000-ton vessel purpose of qou ;cl eat-
begun at Camden, N. J. Left to right: Senator Wvallace White, Maine; _____
Senator Wesley L. Jones, Washington; Pahl W. Chapman, president of ii
the United Stats Lines, and Senator Davitht W. Morrow of New Jersey. II

Tly 1; " /0

WesI~ Maur Giv~es
Talk on Press Meetink
Wesley Maurer, of the journalism ;
department, discussed the Mlichigan I
Interscholastic llress association,
which mneets in Aim Arbor for a
three-day session Dec. 11, 12, andj
13, yesterday from the University
broadcasting studio.

RADIO TODAY
"Infectionrs and How to Pre-
vent 'them" will be the subject
)f anl address this afternoon by
Dr. Ievi.,ai,. 1. fRuecker, of the
,nedicexl school, fFomn the Univer-
aity broadcasting s t u d i o. Dr.
Rifecker will consider colds and
scarlet- fever.

Hunting Season
op en tae:Foster's
until Christmas
Bag ag;ft for
every member

1

III

i

6. _ . r _ _...__

Would You Like to
RET'IR

Eminent Spanish Pianist

at Ae

65

of th :

family.

We Have A Policy That Pays:
$100 A Month After Age 65
$100 A Month in Case of Disability
$10,000 ins Case of Natural Death
$20,000 in Case of Accidental Death
D. B. Conley, District Representative
Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co. of Philadelphia
2117 Devonshire Road Phone 7720

I

I

.,
~ 17

CHORAL UNION
SERI ES
Frday1 ec. 12
8:15
t! HILL
AUDITORIUM
Tickets
$1.00,9$1.50,9$2.00,
$2.50

I w'°T r r
Jiosters's couse of
Art
213 South State
Better Hurry
Last Days'

I

I

11

W

_L _

LAe ST 4
TIMES
TODAY f- AL
ZANE GRE Y'S
LAST OF THE DUANES
with
GEORGE O'BRIEN
:bane Grey's mighty tale of the great Southwest where cattle
men play a gamne of quick gun play and shy love making.

2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

Marvelous!
SSnappy!
Gay!
j

stealing bad

I

'. 3 =a".-_r- v-.-:.GW---..----..r.--- dG- ow
nnnr~no~~a~a~fla~fwsLs~a ~.t t3S

I

C

ALSO
"THE BEAK.-UP"
Captain Jack Robinson and his dog "'Scooter" take you on an exten4ed
trip through Alas3ka. See the wonders of A 'thousand Smokes, un-scaleable
Mt. McKinley, and the annual break-up of ice on the Yukon.

I

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CLI VER

PHONE 82411

mmm

x

. r,
4 C " .
'P,
F rti ' s,

7jE6W

I

I

'C RIS IA
in
E v e r y Wednesday
afternoon at 41
during the school

I

JOY' MONTH SPECIAL
EXCEPT SATURDAY AN SUNE
All Seats lOc Until 2 o'clock
LAST TIMES TODAY
Aso Foss 4..:

)A

$° 00

a.nd

00

e ave teLatest in.
Gay-tees and Oxfords
FOR WMEN
V ~ avesonething to be thankful
for,, that we can cover -the feet wgith
the best of leathers and. cornfoTable
styles at a very reasonable costa Our
shoes are only cheap in prices not in
oliy

;iIN
wA". ,DNLDi?
1 1=
11~ (I >r
t 1 1
PICUP!
~ ARTIST'

I-

;,i

t

!l i 1

le a 141 2. .'VW ® U3H 1

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