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December 06, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-06

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4

PAGE FOUR

T1-1E MIC1-IGAN

I)AILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1930

~r fl. -r -w rr.r4 -r'r -r-r-rrwrr rr.

Published every morning except :Monday
Juring the University year by the Board ni
Coatrol of Student Puldications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial1
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan,eas second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITOR[ALSTAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
IIINRY MERRY
l<RANK E. CoopEr, City Editor
News Editor................Gurney Williams
Editorial iDirector..........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Elitor..............Joseph A. Russell
Wonen's Editor ........... Mary L. Behymer
1Ivusic, Drama, Books........Wm J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor.......Harold O. Warren
Assistant News Editor...Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor .......... George A. Stauter
Copy Editor .................. Wm. E. Pyper
NIGhT EDIITORS

has been in three

presidential cab-

inets, a man of great capability'
and honesty. He is a good member
for their exclusive little club, and
they want to have him. Vare, onE
the other hand, did not quite meas-
ure up to their standards as one of
the men who should run the coun_-
try; he was excluded.
Senator Nye is playing with fire;
sometime in the future he will get
his hands burned. If he were ap-
pointed to the committee to im-,
prove the swamp lands in Wash-
ington, or to rid the town of mus-
quitoes, the nation would be in-
tensely relieved.
And just as a matter of curios-

6a
HONI SOIT QUI
MAL Y PENSEh
IJL*T i

J _3C AND DRA
I THE FOOL

WE RENT
WE SERVICE R WSosL
WE SELL
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
Tel. 2-2812 615 E. William

i

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i
A
1
J
1
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The Wesleyan Players, the dra-
It strikes me that there is a lot matic organization connected with
of cheap advertising creeping into the First Methodist church, will
the publication of our campus peri- offer as its annual production
odicals these days. First the In- Channing Pollock's famous drama,
lander makes a bid for fame by in- "The Fool." Appearing in this
serting obscene typos, and then the drama, which deals with the trials
Gargoyle turns up with a scheme of a young minister in the face of
to suck in the poor Ann Arbor an unsympathetic world, are several
Ministers of the gospel on one of mem)-bers from outside the group
their filthy promotion rackets. I who are prominent in campus dra-
am informed that they are baiting matics. Among these are Florence

TYPEWRITING
and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A specialitysfor twenty
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
ators . . Moderate rates.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Phone 6615
- AAAA~AAA

Announcing the formal opening of
THE HAT BOX INC.
America's Style Creators and Original Custom-Made Shops
HATS CUT ON THE HEAD
NOTE: Every hat is made on approval. If you are not entirely
satisfied with the finished model there is absolutely no obligations
onyour part. We make this unusual offer because we have con-
fidence in our ability to please you.
FEATURE OPENING $2.95 complete
We remodel your old hats.
715 North University-Miss M. Raub, Designer

Call for appointment

Phone 23534

S. Beatch :oner
Carl S. Iorsythe
David M. Nichol

oh I. Reindel
'hRhard L. robirn
Harold 0. Warren

SPoTs ASSISTANTs
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Robert Townsend
REPORTERS

ity, we wonder why Ann Arbor Billy Sunday in the next issue.
ministers read the Gargoyle. hoping to sell a few numbers out-
* *~ *side of the town.
At times we wonder whether it!
wouldn't be better just to name a
five cent cigar for Mr. Coolidge and Notice is hereby oflicially
have him give up other forms of given to the fact that a local
publicity, store is advertising 'The Ideal
Shower Gift'. Something for aj
We know a congressman who, if rainy day no doubt.
you give him time, can dig up * * *
something in Abraham Lincoln's BE LOYAL-REMEMBER THE A.P.
collected speeches, revealing a firm ANN ARBOR, Dec. 5.--AP (Aw
stand on Muscle Shoals. Piffle). Rawlston Q. Smith, '32Lit.,
stated in an interview the other'
----;-day, yesterday to be exact, that he
didn't care for Ann Arbor weather.
Campus Opnion The chances are that the weather
Contributors a" asked to be brief, doesn't care much for Ann Arbor
confining themsehxes to less than 300 I Students either.
words if possible. Anonymous com-
munications w.ill bc d~si egardlcd. The I
names of communicants willhowever,
be regarded as confidential, upon re- There's a little shop inthe
quest. Letters published should not be1r Arcade which is at present ad-
Construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily. vertisimg 'Free Makeup Service.'
f , ; ~~~~~Wogl th r' fnr .t bP

Walter S. Baer, Jr
Irving J. Blumberg
Thomas 1I. ('ooley
George Fisk
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
Frank B. Gilbreth
Tack Goldsmith
Roland( 0d man
Morton Helper
Edgar Hlornik
Tames 11. Inglis
Denton C. Kunze
Powers Moulton
Lyikne Adams
Betty (Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Emily G. Grimes
Elsie M. lHoffmeyer
Jean Levy
Dorothy Magee

. Wilbur .. Meyers
Rob~ert L. Pierce
Slier 1'I. Ouraishi
Richard Racine
Terry E. Rosenthal
George Rubenstein
Charles A. Sanford
Karl Seiffert
R~obe~rt F. Shawv
Edwin Al. Smith
George A. Stauter
Parker Terrpbcrry
John S. Townsend
Robert D. Townsend
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosenthal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell

i

Mary McCall Barbara Wright
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone2 1214
T. IHoLLISTER MABLEY, Business ManagerI
KASPFER . HAL vER oN, Assistant Manager
) E'PARTM ENT MAAC(ERS
Advertising ................charles '. Kline
Advertising.......... . . Thon - s M. Davis
Advertising............William V. Warboys
Service............ . .. Norris J. Johnson
Publicaiom............Robert W. Wiliamsonl
Circulation..............Marvii S. Ko acker
Accounts ...............hoias S. Muir
Business Secretary...........Mary J. Kenan1
Assistants
larry U. Beglev on W. Lyon
Ve rnoii Bishiop WVill iam [o rgai
William :Brown N. Fred Schaefer
RobertCallahan Richard Stratenieier
William W. Davis Noel Il. 'Joner
Richard 11. Hiller Byron C. Vedder
Erie Kigbtlinger
Ann W. Verner Helci Olsen
Marian Atran Mildred Postal
H-elen Bailey M"arorie Rough
Josephine Convisser Mary E. Watts
Dorothy Layhin . Johanna Wiese
Sylvia Miller
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1930
Night Editor-BEACH CONGER, Jr.
THE SENATE SNOOPER
James J. Davis, senator from the
state of Pennsylvania, was seated.
on the Senate in spite of the em-
phatic protests of Senator Gerald
("Snoopy") Nye and his investiga-.
tion committee. This is the first
'time that the august body of sages
has voted to override the recom-
mendations of the committee, and
may be said to be showing remark-
able intelligence for a group which,
as William Hard said recently "the'
country would rather have at home
than at Washington legislating"
Senator Nye still has a bone to
pick with Davis, however, for his
dignity has been offended and is
still vigorously investigating the
Pennsylvania elections, but he is
action on his "startling" revela-
doomed to be disappointed if he
hopes that the Senate will take any
tions. It is men of intelligence,
such as Davis, that the Congress
is in need of rather than the small-
fry, back woods representatives
that worry about the insignificant
details, and in doing so, forget the
larger issues at stake. Senator Nye
was elected to represent the inter-
ests of the citizens of North Dako-
ta at the national legislature, in-
stead he spends his time sneaking
from state to state, and back again,
in an effort to collect a group of
courageous and excellent men t(
blackball. If he spent as much time
on elections where mediocre men
were involved, instead of trying to
obtain publicity by associating his
name with the more nationally
known and capable men, his ef-
forts might benefit the nation.
Nye claims that Davis s p e n t
$200,000 more than he reported to
the committee, bringing his total
up to around $600,000, or just $200,-
000 less than the amount Vare
spent, and for which expenditure
he was barred from membership
in the senate. This is a great deal
of money to spend in an election,
if Nye's statements are true. But
the Senate's decision to seat Davis,
in spite of the amount of money
he might have spent, is merely an
indiation that thv r tirin' of

To the Editor :
A good share of the
student body pleasantly anticipat-~
ed the general J-Hop celebration
for the completion of the first
semester until the Student Council
rudely shattered the joyful pros-
pectus with its announcement that
if the Senate Committee should ap-
prove its action no fraternity would
be able to hold a dance on the eve-
ning of the J-Hop. The council's
theory behind its action is that
the economic situation will causeI
a smaller number of that group
on the campus interested in the
J-Hop to be present this year, and
that the desirability of perpetuat-
ing the J-Hop in the lavish style
justifies an action forcing mem-
bers of another campus group to
patronize the J-Hop.
First as to this year's Hop itself.
The J-Hop committee's budget was
rejected by the Senate Committee
on the grounds that in adjusting
the budget to a smaller atten-
dance, of the lavishness in music
and decoration would be sacrificed
and that this fact would fatally
reduce the attractiveness of the
Hop. Admitting for the moment
that the Hop should be given only
for those interested and that their
number would be less this year, it
would seem practical to reduce the
size of the affair and hold it in
Waterman Gymnasium. When the
capitol at Washington can grace-
fully reduce its social functions in
accordance with business condi-
$ions, it seems slightly ridiculous
that an element in a state univer-
sity should feel obliged to main-
tain the lavishness of an annual
social function to the dollar. After
all a lot of us aren't back in school
this year and most of us that are
wear last year's clothes, so that the
religious adherence to a financial
social standard seems very superfi-
cial.
As to the principle involved in
the Council's ruling: it would seemI
to change the aspect of the Hop
from that of a spontaneous student
celebration to Social 31 with triple
bolts. The Hop's main attribute is
pleasure giving and that anyone
interested in its success should pro-
pose as a step to that end the ruin
of its pleasantness is unusually
stupid.
The J-Hop was originally pro-
jected by the first fraternities on
the campus. It was managed by
them until the independent ele-
ment became so large as to prevent
the Hop from being a truly univer-
sity function. Then the Hop was
reorganized as an all-campus af-
fair and so existed for a number
of years the Hop increased in
size with the university until it be-
came so large that some frater-
nities preferred to give their own
parties at Hop time. This is thor-
oughly in keeping with the com-
mon trend of university social sub-
division and implies only that. To-
day the general J-Hop celebration
is not confined to the Hop proper.,
It is campus wide. The Hop itself
is largely attended by independ-
ents. The social scheme as it stands
seems logical and complete, so that
the attempt of the Student Coun-
cil to kee one element of the cele-

vei ,Mere ss SOry, ZU., Ulmz.,
and Sociology-I guess I won't
bother about the Rhetoric just now,
unless, of course, they're really
anxious.
* * *
In my absence the fact of the
famous debating victory over
the forces of outer darkness
was shamefully overlooked by
my substitute with the appro-
priate name. It is too late now
for me to do more than con-
gratulate the victors and wish
them the joy of their spoils.
** *

Tennant, Palmer Bollinger, Robert
MacDonald, and Franklin Com-
tmins. The play is to be given only
one performance in the Mendels-
sohn Theatre tonight at 8:15.
SYMPHONYCU CNCERT
The School of Music Student
Symphony Orchestra under the
direction of Prof. David Mattern.
will make its first appearance of
this year Sunday afternoon at 4:151
in Hill Auditorium. This orchestra
is made up of about seventy stud-
ents of orchestra and geenral con-
cert activities.
The program for Sunday after--
noon's concert includes the follow-
ing numbers:
Overture " Euryanthe" ..Weber
Symphony, Op. 33..... Schumann
Andante
Larghetto
Scherzo
Allegro anim ato
Ballet Suite .............. Gluck
Slavonic Dances, Nos. I and II..
.Dvorak
Schumann's first symphony, fre-
quently called the "Spring" sym-
phony was written shortly after his
marriage and is one of his most
charming compositions. The Gluck
Ballet Suite includes numbers from
"Iphigenia in Aulis, "'Orpheus,"
and "Armide." The program is
open to the general public.
LADIES OF THilE JURY
The invincible grande dame of
the American Thmatre is touring
again. Next week Mrs. Fiske is to
appear at the Wilson Theatre in
Detroit in a play by Fred Ballard
called "Laadies of the Jury" staged
by Harrison Grey Fiske. After the
burden of several difficult revivals,
Mrs. Fiske is confining herself this
season to an attractive contcmoor-
,ry comedy dealing with the intri-
cacies of jury decision in the locked
room. The human crazy-quilt that
composes the mixed jury includes
a wealthy society woman, a girl
just out of college, a movie theatre
ticket seller, a couple of small town
"uplifters," an Irish cook, a Rotar-
ian realtor, A greek candy--store

BROWN-CRESS
& Company, Inc.
INVESTMENT
SECURITIES
Orders executed on all ex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.
Telephone 23271

11

lii. fIl r

ANN ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
1st FLOOR ONLY
I2ve.Y v~v..vY rvv'.v.vYw-v~vvnvi

lean, Pleasant and With Excellent Service
ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

_. .T..._.,..,y.... . .. .....y.............

t a f
eE<< .:k-

DINING

ROO0M

ENJOY YOUR SUNDAY DINNER
AT
FRl"EEMAN'S

- - - . ,,

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister

10:30 A.
"THE

M.---Morning Worship.
BREAD OF LIFE."
Dr. Fisher.

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEYAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 Noon-Regular Sunday School
Classes.
Rabbi Heller of Hillel Foundation
will speak at the Sunday Evening
Devotional meeting at 6 o'clock.
Social Hour at 7 o'clock.

7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.
"CHR1&r'S ULTIMATE WISDOM"
Rev. Harold Phillips
First Baptist Church, Cleveland
(Wesleyan Guild Lecture)

SPOILS

And speaking of cheap publicity, owner, a World War veteran, and a
there hasn't been the equal of what Scotch gardner.
they're getting away with at Mimes The interplay of this coil.ectiont
this year since that time Uncle Joe in the jury room furnishes Mrs.
couldn't find his socks on the eve Fiske, who plays the part of the
of the big Democratic Rally. Why; wealthy society woman sweeping
if that show is censored the way into court with dogs and maids,
the Washtenaw Tri-ne claims it and things and takes it upon her-
is, I'm a gold-plated mahogany self to change the minds of all
hat-rack, and if you don't believe eleven remaining jurors, with a
it, come around and see me some rare vehicle for her peculiar comic
time. talent. The play will run a week
* * *at the Wilson, opening Monddy
The Pherret tells me that night.

they've even got a-well, you
know, right on the stage, and
nobody's said a word about it.
WHOOPS!
The Student Council is, after
many years, justifying its exist-
ence! The papers tell us that they
have just made a move, after some,
deliberation, to stop the sale of J-
Hop tickets until such a time as
the Soph Prom may be safely over
and out of the way. I am heartily
in favor of anything that stops the
sale of J-Hop tickets. One troubleI
with the idea is that it may possibly
help out the Soph Prom.
That one in the last Gargoyle
about the fisherman reminds
me of the one about the gent
who came home with empty
hands and a dragging fish-pole
who said he'd just taken it out
for a herring, don't you wish
it hadn't?

"AW NUTS"
Monday night, and then all
through the week will see the
much-awaited substitute for the
I lately deceaed opera in the form
of a campus revue, confining itself
to lively commentary on local top-
ics and endeavouring to meet the
criticism of the opera that it had
no particular relation to the cam-
pus. The Revue honestly commits
itself as an all-student production,
having refused the elaborate bloom
t h a t professional direction, pro-I
fessional costuming , professional
scenery gave the otherwise sterile
oera. There will be several musi-
cal numbers. But the revue is
largely a succession of skits in the
manner of the English revue. Its
appearance is of some significance
because granted its success, this
type of revue will become an annu-
al affair with Mimes; and there l

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
. E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Worship and Sermon.
Mr. Sayles will preach. Topic:
"The Great Confession."
12:00 N.-University Students' class
meets at Guild House. Mr. Chap-
man. Closes at 12:40.
5:30 P. M.-Special social hour to
meet Rev. Paul Alden of New
York.
6:30 P. M.-Mr. Alden will speak
on some of the "Challenging
Problems on Mission Fields To-
day "
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Influence of God's
Promises."
11:00 A. M.,---Service in German.
7:00 P. M. - Young People's
League.

Byron Novetsky.
Address: "Science
Leon Gropper.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
11:15 A. M.-Religious Service,
All student service conducted by

Violin solo by A. B. Kaminskey.

and Religion" by

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Two-Mile Men." New
members to be received.
12:00 Noon--Student Classes.
5:30 P: M.--Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Speaker: Dean Wilber R.
Humphreys.
6:30 P. M.-Graduates, Professional
and Business Young People's dis-
cussion on "Teachings of Jesus
Concerning Properity."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
December 7, 1930
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Hunger."
9:30 A. M.-Church School. Illus-
trated talks on "Early Hebrew
History."
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship so-
cial half hour.
6:00 P. M.-Fellowship supper.
6:30 P. M.-Miss Ottilie Davis will
give an illustrated talk on the
"Passion Play."
ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.--loly Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall.1
9:30 A. M.-Church School (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00 A. M.--Holy Communion;
sermon by Mr. Lewis.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall. Speaker, Mr. Weaver.
7:45 P. M.-Evensong and Address.

BE
CONSISTENT
IN YOUR
RELIGION
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

4

*thzen will have been no break in
THINK! its admirable Opera tradition.
Isn't anybody going to do any- -U B -AD E G
thing about Newberry Auditorium? KEUTZEERG D GEORGI
I am falling into a slough of The seccnd Ann Arbor appear-
despond over the whole business. ance of these famous pupils of the
The idea does take hold so sloughly. famous Mary Wigman is eagerly
3 * * awaited by the sizeable audience!
It's the third wave that al- interested in the present renais-
ways makes two in the bush. Sance of the dance, that has grown
* * *up in Ann Arbor since their sensa-
GAME tional recitals here last year.
Uncle Danny has found another The German school, of which
game for you fellows! This one is this pair is now the most notable
easy. Just walk down the street in representative, is perhaps the most;
the rear of anv female and sav to vital influence in the conni mnor-

I

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.--Sunday School.
9:00 & 10:30 A. M.-Advent serv-
ices. Sermon topic: "Jesus, the
Lord's Anointed."
4:45 P. M.-Student Study hour.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic. "God the Only
Cause and Creator."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
December 7, 1930
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Worship
in English. Sermon topic: "Com-
paring the Times."
5:30-6:30 P. M.-Student Social

7:30 P. M.-Wednesday

Evening

11

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