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December 04, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-04

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PAGE FOUR

TI-1E TAIIC1_1 GA j DAILY

TltUKSIDAY, DE CIENUBEH -1, 193JO

PAGE FOUR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1930 THE fVIICIIIGAN Dz\ILY

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Cotrol of .Student Publications.
24 ember of Western Conference Editorial
As socistion.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news Epublished
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; 3USileSS, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
'RANX1' E. COOPER, City Editor
News Editor................Gurney Williams
Editorial Director..........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor ..............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor...........Mary L. Behymer
Music. lrama, Books........Win. J. Gormnan
Assistant City Editor.......h~arold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor.. Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor........... George A.> Stauter
Copy Editor ..................Win. E. Pyper
NIGHT EDITORS

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. osythe
D~avid M. Nichol

John1 1). Reindel
Richard L. Tobin
Harold 0. Warren

SPORTS Asss'rAv's
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Robert Townsend
REPORTERS
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Wilbur . Meyers
Irving J Blumberg RobertL. Pierce
kThomas M. Cooley Sher M. Quraishi
George Fisk Richard Racine
Morton Frank Terry I:. Rosenthal
Saul Friderg George Rubenstein
Frank B. Gilreth Charles A. Sanford
Jack Goldsmith Karl Seiffert
Roland Goodman Robert F. Shaw
Morton Helper EwinM Smith-
Edgar ,ornik George A. Stater
James H. Inglis Parker Terryerry
Denton C. Kunze John S. Townsend
Powers Moulton Robert D. Townsend
Lyne A dams Margaret 'B ien
Betty Clark leanor airdon
Elsie Feldman Jean Roental
Elabeth Gribble Cecilia Shriver
Emily G. Grimes Frances Stewart
Elsie M. Ioffmeyr Ane Margaret Tobin
Jean Levy Margaret Thompson
Dorothy Magee Claire Trussell
« Mary McCall Barbara Wright
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone _21214
T. HOLLiSTER MAsL, BUSiness Manager
KASPPR H; HIALERON, Assistant Manager
-DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertising................Charles 'r. Kline
Advertising .........,......Thomas M. Davis
Advertising............Willam W. Warboys
Service ................... Norris J. Johnson
Publication............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation :. ........Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts........... ........homas S. Muir
.Business Secretary...........Mary J. Kenan
Assistants
Harry R. legev Don W. Lyon
Vernon Bishop Wiliam Morgan
William Brown H. Fred Schaefer
Robert Callahan R icard Stratemeier
William W. Davis Noel D. Turner
Richard H. Hiller Byron C. Vedder
Erle Kightlinger
Ann W; Verner Helen Olsen l
Marian Atran Mildred Postal
1helen Bailey Marjorie Rough
Josephine Convisser Mary E. Watts
Dorothy Laylin Johanna Wiese
Sylvia Miller
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1930
Night Editor-JOHN D. REINDEL
TEACHERS WHO TEACH.
One of the questions confront-
ing university authorities today is
the choice between professors who
conduct research work while hold-
ing teaching positions, and profes-
sors who devote all of their time
to the teaching profession.
Judging from the number of pro-
fessors on the Michigan campus
who are spending many hours each
week in research work, the Univer-
sity does not altogether agree with
views held at the University of
Chicago where it is claimed pro-
fessors should devote the bulk of
their time to teaching, that they
should be given salaries adequate
enough to make up for any income
the professor might realize from
outside work, and that the man
who engages in serious research
work often considers his classes
and students as an added nuisance.
There can be no doubt that a
majority of the professors here are
doing work that will prove of value
to mankind in general, but it must
be said that many of them consid-
er their students and classes of
minor importance. This might also
be said of certain professors who
spend much of their time writing
books, and as a result are unable
to grade the papers of their stu-
dents and hold adequate consulta-
tions. The University in picking
such men for the faculty should
not overlook that the students need
active attention from the instruc-
tors and that contact with men
who are interested in their views
and ambitions will be of great value
in the world to them in later years.
It can be said that the professor
is primarily interested in research
work in certain cases may encour-
age a limited number of students
to become experts in a certain field
but generally this is to ignore the
majority of students who are not
looking for specialization but gen-
eralization, particularly in the lit-

erary college.
A professor, who should be paid
for teaching Michigan men, should

the first attempt to force a specialc
session of the recently elected Con-
gress. The obstacles came in the
form of an attempt to keep Senator
James J. Davis, former Secretary
of Labor, from the seat in the
Senate which he won in the last
elections.
The charges, the time-worn alle-
gation that too much money had
been spent in securing the election,
were set up as the bait, so often
successful in the past, by SenatorI
Nye, of North Dakota, demanding
that the oath of office be withheld.3
But the tempting morsel was turned
aside and the motion was promptly
defeated by a two to one vote.
Senator Davis received even the
support of the steering committee
of the Democrats who refused
Senator Nye's demands "because
the special committee may request
further time to investigate the
charges."
The whole country desires that
Congressional proceedure should be
free from the unnecessary hind-
rance of special sessions. This is
true in times of prosperity for the
public fears a decline in industry
and trade. It is even more true at
the present time when the country
is in the throes of one of the worst
business depressions in the recent
history of the United States.
It is highly gratifying, therefore,
to see the prompt manner with
which the first obstruction was met
and swept out of the way. Their
speed in this action is a good baro-
meter of the determination of the
Congress to complete their task on
schedule.
There's little doubt about it;
President Hoover's new fund for
the unemployed, will at least serve
to keep hosts of sub-sub-treasurers
and sub-sub-sub-secretaries busy.
Zeta PhitEta,bin challenging
Alpha Nu to debate on whether
co-eds behave like human beings,
would seem to admit that women
have some Gou on the matter.
President Hoover says rigid eco-
nomy is necessary to avoid increase
in taxes. Apparently, he is getting
in practice to take over Mr. Cool-
idge's platitude column.
Representative Lea, Dry leader,
contends that the liquor question
will still exist a thousand years
from now. The prohibitionists, it
seems, are beginning to worry
about the solution 900 years too
soon.
0

DAISIES
WON'T
Everyone is asking where Dan
Baxter is. He has gone off into
another orgy of abandon. I know,
where he is but I won't tell where
he is. Nobody who knows where
he is will tell where he is. Perhaps
nobody knows where he is. Where
is he?
Nothing has been done about
Newberry Auditorium yet and
I certainly am surprised. Per-
haps, if it were thoroughly
renovated it might take on a
certain degree of dignity, but
that wouldn't help its qualities
of ventilation a bit, nor they
heating system either. You can
heat all of that building some
of the time and you can heat
all of the building some of the
time but you can't heat some of
the building all of the time.
Some day I am going to burst
in on my ten o'clock lecture
via the fire escape that comes
up from the ground to the door
that opens onto the proscen-
ium.

MUCC AND DAAj
MUSICAL ART QIAlTET,
A ieyiew.
No quartet that has appeared in
Ann Arbor in some time so consis-
tently discovered and maintained
ideal chamber music "qunaities" as
did the Musical Art Quartet of Nw
York in a splendid proaram last
evening. In their performanc
chamber music regained its ci-
teenth century connotations. Thir!
approach to the music was modest
and refined. There was no striving
for an aggressive brilliance, a per-
sonal vigor or power. Only the l
mildness and cahn spontaneity of
sympathy with the music: sym-
pathy so complete as to need no
insistence to become apparent. The
result was a fine tenor of intimacy
to the whole evening. That the au-
dience clearly felt this was indicat-
ed, I think, by the locally uncus-
tomary practice of refraining from
applause between movements.
The musical things that. happen-
ed entirely justified this aristocra-
tic refinement. The early Beetho-
ven quartet was read very lucidly;
very sensitively: the music's de-
mands calmly, fastidiously satis- }
fled. One came much closer to this
music and was better able to for-;

WATLING
-C--
LERCHEN &
HAYES
Members
New York Stock Exchange
Detroit Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
Dealers in
Investment
Securities
Accounts Carried
for Clients
Mezzanine Floor
FIRST NATIONAL
BANK BLDG.
Phones: 23221-23222

Suits Pressed...............
Hats Cleaned and Blocked.
All kinds of alterations at
CHAS. DOUKAS
1319 South University

« :- u.T:.
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BRASS-

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Symbol of
Strength,
Dignity,
and
Character

''he +Christmnas shopper willnd our
ccilection of BRASS wide in selec-
tion and viariedl in price.
Lete Openers
Ink Webls
Desk Ornaments
(Animals, etc.
Ash Trays
Desk Sets
Desk Lights
Paper Weights
YEAR CHRISTMAS

GIVE BRASS THIS

The Mayer-Schairer Co.
112 South Main Street

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NOTICE!

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cost.

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E RENT r
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CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
Tel ?-?z,.?615 E. Williamp

Those who live in the neighbor- get details of performance than is
hood of the intersection of Packard ever possible: say with the Lner
and State have been denied the Quartet, where technical eccentri-
pleasure of watching automobile cities are continually asking us to
accidents by an all too prosaic city think "what rich feelings these men
council. There was once a time, and seem to have about thismusic '.
niot so far back, either, when auto- And for any music (though parti-
mobiles going south (or is it east) cularly with so rigorous and im-
on State Street with a fair amount personal a medium as the quartet>4
of ice under-wheel would coast this self-effacement is ideal.
(barring accidents) from the stop- The most amz ing thing" in the
light at Packard all the way down evening, however, ,vas the reading
to the Administration Building or cf the Debussy Quartet, The son- '
thereaboutseven with everynbrake sational possibilities of the scot
lockeds and the ignition turned off. (the variety of striking momnents .
Happy students used to stand on that Debussy's coloristic instincts
the adjacent corners and thrill with make possible) were carefuly in
pleasure at the high percentage of imiSed. There was very subtle sen-
damages and injuries that occurred. sitiveness to 'ovements as wnole,
One fine slippery day a venture- and a broad grasp of Debussy atti-
some motorist who failed to ac- tudes that made the score, at least
curately harmonize distance, speed, Wor me, infinitely more expres ive
and tractive power, plunged over and stirring than it has ever ben
the curb and well-nigh demolished before. The beautifully played slew
a handsome mail-box, much to the movement was suerb realization
delight of a number of onlookers, of all the French artistic aims in
It was not half an hour after this the 80's and 90's: the insistence by
accident before the industrious Ann Mallarme and the French symbil-
Arbor shovellers were busy pouring ists on the firm beauties possibse
gravel onto one of the finest slides in sheer reverie. It had always
in the city. The matter was brought seemed before n e r e1y original
before the United States govern- sound.
ment and the mail box was rein- T h e Glazoi3nev Andante was
stated on the other side of the somewhat inconsecuential musle.
walk, adjacent to a substantial But the gay and g>7 y
brick wall. I might add that the dance vivace was a splendid con-
hill is always sanded nowadays and cfusion to a fine progranm.
there isn't any more excuse for Unfortunately, the quartet saw
standing on the corner, fit to continue the tradition of New
York organizations in apologizing
OH LOOK to the Middle West for sensitively
constructed programs by playing
some "better restaurant" music for
encores: an Albeniz "T'ango," a
Nevis "Song of le lBrotk" and
perhaps another one.
The most outstanding character-
istic of the ensemble was its i;id
devotion to Mr. Sascha Jacobsen,
who proved himself a thorough
enough musician to merit it. Julian
kahn, substituting at cello, was
very adequate, though quite prop-
Trhe Spirit of Christmas. erly a little cautious.
Why is it that professors insist UGG'1RO R1CC1

THE MOST HILARIOUS, PEPPY, HUMOROUS STUDENT
PRODUCTION EVER STAGED IN ANN ARBOR
' ' MAKE TICKET RES-
ERVATIONS AT
MAIN DESK AT THE
N UITS M UNION.
THE MIMES ALL-CAMPUS REVUE, DECEMBER 8-13
AT THE FORMER MIMES THEATRE--TICKETS ALL PRICED AT $1.50
A Glorious Riot of Fun-Songs-Dances-Skits

Also A Newsreel Featuring Prexy, Jo Bursley, Bud
In "rivate Scandals.

Rea, And Others

DON'T MISS THIS LAUGH-PROVOKING GLOOM CHASER

j ,, wuam
. '
I
i 111111
}
i
i
i
i
f q7
1 '!
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Editorial Comment
4 PERCENT RELIEF
(From The Princetonian.)
"Liquor is more expensive and
not always so reliable, but while
you can still get it, why object, why
bother?" That, in brief, has been
the substance of public apathy
toward Prohibition. During our lush'
years of prosperity, the economicI
consequences were ignored. In the
present cycle of depression, how-
ever, consumer and manufacturer
alike are beginning to resent the
throwing of vast sums into the
never-sated maw of Enforcement
and of the loss of government reve-
nue.
From the records of 1914 it is
shown that the return of light
wines and beer would net the gov-
ernment an annual internal reve-
nue of over 150 million dollars. In
addition, the amount spent yearly
on enforcement would go to the
credit side of the ledger. In view
of the admitted probability of a'
deficit in federal receipts, this is
no trivial consideration.
From the standpoint of capital
and labor, the 1914 Federal Census
of Manufacturers indicates that
over one billion dollars would be
involved in the re-establishing of
the brewing and vinting industries,
and the number of laborers em-
ployed in building, trucking, manu-
facturing and bottling, considered
together with their dependents,
would involve a total of about two
million persons.
The legalizing of beverages of low
alcoholic content would also do
much to relieve the tribulations of
the Middle West. In 1913, when
prices were low, the actual farm
value of grain and hops purchased
by brewers was over 87 million
dollars, and it was computed that
the average barrel of beer yielded
the farmer $133.98. To the interest
of mine share-holders and work-
ars, the United States Fuel Admin-
istration estimated that in 1917,
brewers used two million tons of
goal.
'T'hcacqe' clrnnicvit c,1 Jofir drnuw

on making sly digs at their col-
leagues before their classes. They
should remember that it is unwise.
to say the least. Children are so
impressionable. Who cares, anyway,'
what our pedants think of one an-
other? Whenever I hear one of my
professors start in on "one of my
colleagues" I fold up and slumber.
I wonder if that is what I'm ex-
pected to do?
Who says whimsies won't
sell! From the size of the crowd
that went to Lydia Mendels-
sohn Tuesday night to see
"Alice in Wonderland" one
might think that the American
citizenry is going three paces
east or something. Maybe the
major interest was in the mor-
bid mechanics of the perform-
ance. Personally I found quite
a bit of charm and amusement
in it, even if they did mess the
story up considerably.
Last year the B & G- boys went
to a lot of trouble to plant bushes
and shrubs all around that little
vacant lot in back of Angell Hall
between the Romance Language
Building and University Hall. The
presumable object was the exclu-
sion of ordinary pedestrians from
the joys of walking across the grass,
though more adventuresome stud-
ents pushed through the bushes
and made the usual trip as before.
The B & G boys will have to get

Those who had one of the most
thrilling musical experiences in
their lives from the boy Ricers
sensitive performance of Beethov-
en's violin concerto in the last May
Festival may be interested in his
recent activity. It seems that the
now 10 year old lad has been
dogged for the last few months by
lawyers and detectives, has been
subjected to all sorts of petty
annoyances and cavillings and
dragged into courts and the offices
of mayors to have decisions made
about him. Despite these complica-
tions that would probably shatter
the temperament of a mature art-
ist, the boy stepped to a large .stage
Monday night and played the
Beethoven violin concerto for a.
large New York audience, with his
teacher Louis Persinger leading the
orchestra accompaniment.
The performance seems to have
amazed the not easily Inflamrahle
New York critics. Olin Downes in
particular wrote the following com-
ments in the New York Times:
"There can hardly be a ciestion
now that the young Ricci is a boy
player of genius . . . That he wiil
be a better and better player as
he grows older can be safely prog-
nosticated' beeau;e o the very
sound artistic qualities of his pre-
sent approach to music . . .At all
times the youthful violinist was
master of himself and the situation.
Cif r''n71-- hr fnq ct f ~1Nt r? r VI

also be more than a
should be capable of

pedant-he
understand-

nrr ec" of .rTnvt -c." - . niv. ie lnnln nv

i,,I!

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