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November 30, 1930 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-30

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PACE FOtUR

THE M.-IC1GAN lAIL.Y

SUNDAY, NOVE'MB:i-R 30, ISmo

s 8 A R....' d* A A ,- i l l ,-A
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s .aomxsuwrww.w wp. w~xrw_ .. _.^-. ..SU DAY, . NOVEMBErR n u 30. 1930VJ S

Published every monfing except Monday
Turin the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication ofall news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise creditedl
tnethie paper and the local news published,
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Anu Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
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Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
hard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Ed~itor.........Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ...........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor ...............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor........Mary L. Behymer
Music. D~ramna. Books........ Win. J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor ......Harold 0. Warren
Assistant NewsEditor.....Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor..........George A. Stauter
Wm. F. Pyper. . ...Copy Editor
NIGHT ]E6iTORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold O. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Roert Townsend
Reporters

Walter S. Baer, Jr
Irving J. Blumberg
rhom-as M. Cooley
George Fisk
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
Frank B. Gilbreth
Jack Goldsmith
Roland Goodman
Morton elper
Edgar lornik
ames H. Inglis
Denton C. Kunze
Powers Moulton

. Wilbur J. Myers
Robert L. Pierce
Slher M. Qtraishi
R ichard Racine
Jerry E. Rosenthal
G;eorge Rubenstein
Charles A. Sanford
Karl Seiffert
Robert F. Shaw
Edwin M. Smith
George A. Stauter
Packer Terryberry
Tohn S. Townsend
Robert D. Townsend
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosenthel
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er Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Emily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoff meye
Jean Levy
Dorothy Magee
Mary McCall

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising.................Charles T. Kline
Advertisii................Thomas M. Davis
Advertising ............William W. Warboys
Service............... .Nor-is J. Johnson
Publication ............ikobert W. Williamson
Circulation .............. Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts .................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary ............Mary J. Kenan

depths of controversy and atten-
tion on as to blind them to ulti-
mate results of their efforts.
AN INJUSTICE REMOVED.
Upon recommendation of the Un
dergraduate Athletic Association
the Yale athletic board has seen fiti
to remove one of the oldest of its
injustices concerning the athletic
award-that of giving minor let-
ters only to winning teams during
season. From now on, Yale wil
give a standard minor letter re-
gardless of whether the season is
successful or not.
Michigan's system of varsity a-
wards has a very definite majo
and minor significance. It was
suggested several years ago that a
standardized award be given foi
all four major sports with a slight-
ly smaller award for minor athletic
contests which would be, however
standard both in design and style
The advisability of other plans
which were proposed last year by
the "M" club and other campus
organizations interested in athletic
matters was discussed, and much
comment resulted, but no action.
For half a dozen years, athletic
directors, coaches, players, friend
of the varsity teams have beer
quoted again and again as being in
favor of either one plan of stand-
ardization or another. Last year
a very definite action was begun
when information w a s secured
from all the other Big Ten schools
concerning the granting of awards
This information was drawn ur
into a letter which was circulated
among "M" club members and sev-
eral meetings were held which
made the standardization proposal
seem more sure than ever. Then
suddenly, nothing was heard of the
proposal and the idea was dropped
Why?
It is our contention that the ac-
tion thus begun should be executed
as soon as it is possible for the
"M" club to again meet and discuss
the problem. Postponement of the
action to a date closer to the end
of school would only mean drop-
ping the whole problem and losing
whatever work has been done to-
ward that goal which seemed so
very near last May. Yale has al-
ready taken definite steps toward
correcting a major evil in its ath-
letic system. It is our task and duty
to tackle a like injustice and get
it out of the way once and for all.
o
Editorial Comment
0--
THE MONITOR SYSTEM
(From the Yale Daily News)
On several occasions the NEWS
has commented on the monitor sys-
tem and stated the belief that
offenses were such as to warrant a
reconsideration of the system and
a correction of its faults. Before
and after vacation periods and
week-ends, the number of cases
where the monitors are asked to
mark students present when they
are really absent, swells perceptibly,
and more often than not, the
monitor is persuaded to comply.
As we have pointed out before,
the monitor system is closely con-
nected with the whole social struc-
ture of the undergraduate body.
The monitors have personal friends
in each class, and find it distaste-
ful to refuse their requests. At the
same time, they are not justified in
juggling their accounts, even when
friendship and the desire for social
good-will are concerned. On the

,.- P E N S
M IAND DRAM A Screen RelectionsNC L .
A aI nk s and all prices
n r ..",:. r ee. ..._ . _ __Th liPi. t - -_ _. i f _

ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Reviewed by Iert Askwith i
Gordon Craig is pretty largely Astyteitlent prectlntheire. 1
responsible for the recent renaais- A3 s4at the fim -4
sance of interest in the puppet- ' Du Barry' at the Majestic informs
show, which is apparent in Amer- the audience that no attem' t was
ica from the wide popularity of made at historical accuracy, the
Tony Sarg's great ventures. Craig plot merely being based on s^4veral l
had a distrust of the actor's art supposed incidents in the lire of
born of the fact that the import- the incompetent French King's
ance granted it was stifling his own competent mistress. Perhaps toe
art of scenic design. So he began result would have been more enter- C
an attack on them: "Marionettes taining had the textbooks been
are men without egotism . . . They consulted more often, for this taleI
are even unaware that we see them, is a staple "True Story' cype dress
a delightful innocence to be found ed up in costly tp'ace costume.
nowhere on a stage filled by hu- Norma Talmadge enacts the title
mans . . . Being egoists men blt role of the charming milhne. lured
interpret themselves; marionettes into a gambling den of iniu.ity
can interpret other things. I really away from boy friend Conrad
cannot take them seriously enough; Nagel, soldier in the king's prhvate
if there is a solemn thing in life guard. Then the king beconmsl
only a marionette can interpret it." enamoured of the fair mimlner,
This is rather startling news to who, despite her unhappiness, is I
most of us who had thought of the installed at the palace. A coem-
;ressed plot woul1d have aided thE
activity of a puppeteer as ratherp ddde
like turning the crank of a hand- 'cture, which is far too lengthy
organ, with the entertainment de- for the amount o% plot action.
rived on a somewhat similar level. Miss Talmadge gives<a satiifac-
Puppetry, sophisticated Americans tory performance, as does Conrad
Pupptry sohisicatd AeriansNagel, although both are iba l i
thought, was child - play to be gb
watched with indulgent eyes. But. capped by poor lines. In every other
aesthetically, there is a good deal respect, however, the production ;i'
( bears thle earm arks of excellent :
of truth in Craig's dictum. Fromnbeure cara-ohot
a certain viewpoint the puppetI picture crafL--potography, sound,
does make a good ideal for the hu- and effects all coming up to the
1 .igh United Ar lht- s stand a rdi.
man actors to strive to approxi- g Uied Arlist e tandard,~
mate. It is a mechanism obeying Other m brs o the ast i-
not the accidents of physiologiceude the reliable old-Aimr,XVi-
and psychologic disturbances that iam Farnum as kin, and oba-
often upset the careful plans of a Bosworth as the ever-oyal CaptaI
pf hepunssGuodf a fahe ' If
director but the will of the one Nod Ga.n a- it
creator, the puppeteer. It certainly Private Nagel .osworth has re_
has no affectations, no effervescent peatedly proven himself an ic
personality to bubble for an audi- character actor, this role being
_omparab le in many res- ects:o s
once. The self--consciousness that 'siar le "n ay Crac o s
plays havoc with natural grace im art in "encral Crack."
humans is eliminated. On the whole, the trouble hes
But more seriously, there is the I sit t ln h n
fact that the life of the puppet i, s usibie plot, which only employs
a function of acting. In the aes- he colorful historical background
theic experience of a puppet-shoe asa elcjcmsurd o
the concept of acting is taken for -v orn torycla t.u
granted and we concentrate on the ral hui oros cesnes are above
life-expression. In the aesthetic to iverag but "Du Barry" only rate
project, and are fascinated by life-
T,-.h41, a low C.

-a ies' Half Soles .... . .90c
Ladies' Soles and Heels. .$1.20
Men's Half Soles
$1.19
Children's Soles .. 50c, 90c
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Repairing
VA LET SERVICE
117 South Main Street
Next to Walk-Over Shoe Store

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WE DELIVER
T- -I-

I

A Red Arrow Place
0. D. MORRILL
South State Phone 6615

III

4#"y

Month

SPIECI.ALS
-AT --
Swift's Drug Store
340 S. State St.
Phone 3534

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1
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a
1
"
. I:

Our Weekly Financial
Letter Contains
Analysis of
Bordcn Company
Continentail
Can
Copy on request
WATLING
LERCHEN &
HAYES
Daily Market Letter
Members
New York Stock Exchange
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(Associate)
Detroit Stock Exchange
Mezzanine Floor
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BLDG.
Phones: 23221-23222

CASH AND CARRY
BARGAINS ON
CLEANING-FORM "PREST" PRESSING
AT OUR BRANCH
7051 NO. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone 4191
Garment Cleaning
Go m an.

I

Harry R. Beglev
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davi
Richard H. Hille
Erle Kightlinger
Ann W. Verner
Marian Atran
71-glen Bailey

Assietants
Don. W. Lyon
WNiiliair' Morgan
'. Frzd Schaefer
. ichard Stratemeier
is Noel D. Turner
:r Byron C. Vedder
Helen Olsen
Mildred Postal
Marjorie Rough

Josephirte Convisser iary .Watts '
I)orothye Laylin Joha na Wiese
Sykvi& Miller-
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1930
Night Editor-RICHARD L. TOBIN
THE END PRODUCT.

Many pertinent conclusions mad
be drawn from an article on "The
Colleges' Contributions to Intellec-
tual Leadership" recently publish-
ed in School and Society by Donald
B. Prentice and B. W. Kunkel of
Lafayette college. In the past col-
leges have been judged by endow-
ment, .equipment, faculty person-
nel, admission requirements and
various other criteria, but undoubt-
edly the most reliable measure is
the quality of the product. On this
assumption, a study of college
alumni included in "Who's Who in
America" was made the basis for
the above article.
Michigan stands fourth among
the colleges whose alumni are in-
cluded as among the nation's lead-
ers, with Harvard, Yale and Prince-
ton ahead of it. Contrary to the
expectations, smaller colleges show
a decided tendency to lead the
state universities in round numbers
of their alumni leaders.
Considering the percentage of
the living alumni in "Who's Who,"
size of the institution apparently
has no effect on the stimulation of
alumni to such leadership as would
gain official recognition. Neither
Michigan nor California is includ-
ed in the first 20; in fact only two
public institutions are mentioned
in that number. This lower index
is most likely associated with the
fact that the public institutions
are not able to make the same se-
lection of students which the pri-
vately endowed are able to do, a
conclusion obviously different from
the one usually quoted by chief
executives of state institutions.
A careful study of the histories of
these colleges which show tenden-
cies counter to the normal index of
circumstances would also provide
many clues to the factors in those
institutions for and against suc-
cess, and be of prophetic value for
those who are engaged in college
administration.

e
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f
3
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1

eXpression. in the aesthetic ex-
perience of a play with humans,
the concept of life, because it is an
inevitable asset of the actor, is
taken for granted and we look for
'acting with its trade-tricks and
judge the performance largely with
the concept of acting in mind. The
puppet's achievement is that of
Living by means of acting; that is,
the fusion of the two concepts,
which should certainly be the aim
of all human actors.
Rather the most important un-
dertaking in puppetry to date in
America is the elaborate produc-
tion of "Alice in Wonderland'
which Tony Sarg, the maestro of
puppets, is bringing to the Men-
delssohn Tuesday night.
THE MUSICAL ART QUARTET
On the occasion of the dissolu-
tion of the Flonzaley quartet, Sam-
uel Chotzinoff, critic of the world,
had the following to say of the
Musical Art Quartet which comes
Ito the Mendelssohn Theatre Wed-
esday night in the second concert
of the Chamber Music Society se-
ries: "It is a satisfaction to know
that an American organization
called 'The Musical Art Quartet' is
ready and abletto continue the no-
ble work of the Flonzaleys. By
dint of great individual artistry of
., i n-p nnl d irnco -1

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t

For a change, the Paramnount
News Reel is entertainingly diversi-
ied. The practice, first instituted oy
Tra.hamMacINMiee as the
<enot in the Universal Reel, of!
an unseen v,'e explaining the
shots and situation, livn up the
.hews consideraby. I
."ikewse, th animal cartoon
:ises above the recent slump into
hich that clan) of shorts has
lallen. Too much emphasis has bee_
laid on musical efiects and dancing
o the exclusion of actual comedy,
;his method entailing far less work, '
ooth mental anc. physical for thI
3en-and-ink artists.

* "The lBorme of
C. H. Schroen

I

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209 So. Fourth Ave.

.aoa s.. _ m in _

---

, I

-M-Ill

I

En ergin.e"

Schroen

i

is player an ty incessant work
other hand, the rest of the under- towards perfection of their ensem-
raduate body is severely to blame ble, the Musical Art Quartet, still
for seeking to exploit the monitor a youthful organization, has nomi-
system. The practice isenot only nated for this honor. In their per-
dishonest, but selfish, since the formance of a Beethoven quartet,
monitor has to take most ofathe it is as if four well-bred and high-
blame if the office finds out that a minded people had come together
man marked present, was, in real- to discuss the most beautiful expe-
ity, absent. rdience of life."
Easy solutions are not at hand,
however. The professors should cer- JOSE ITURBI
tainly take attendance occasionally The last concert in the Choral
and check the monitor's report with Union Series before Christmas will
his own. Many of them do. But this be given by Jose Iturbi, Spain's
probably does not uncover cases in pianist, whose New York debut last
which nien enrolled in the class year was the pianistic sensation of
send substitutes to occupy their the musical season. While there he
seats. The best solution we know of, was fully tested in appearances!
on the other hand, is to have one with the New York Philharmonic
or more readers appointed as per- orchestra and in several recitals.
manent attendance takers. This He was unanimously acclaimed as,
would eliminate the practice of with Horowitz, the most brilliant of
"fixing" the monitors. In a short all the younger pianists.
time, the readers would familiarize A particular point of praise in
themselves with the faces in the the unanimous enthusiasm granted
room, and be able to detect substi- Iturbi by New York critics last sea-
tutions. son was for the admirable arrange-
But in a community like Yale, ment of his programs. In reminisc-
such drastic measures ought not to ing about his several recitals Olin
be necessary. The moral co-opera- Downes said: "Iturbi shows almost
tion of the undergraduate body an uncanny skill in devising musi-
with the monitor system, so long cal schemes which bring a con-
as it is in force, is the best and tinuity into the psychology of the
most effective solution to the pres- concert audience. He makes the
ent evils. If students will consider most amazing juxtapositions of
the nroblem and enme to the roL_ rnIjmnrrn niwP'. mwith rnlcciralim-r--

l
L

Bert Wheeler and Bob Woolsey,
,omedy team in "1-io Rita," are on
'est at the Midhigan in their new
starring effort "Half Shot at Sun-
rise."
Conrad Nagel's "Numbered Men,
z drama of prison life, is at the
Nuerth.
Vil lRogers' newest picture,
'Lightnin'," adapted from the fain-
d long-run play of the same name,
ias its premiere at the Fox in De-!
zroit this week. Helen CohanI
2-corge M's daughter, makes an
Auspicious screen debut herein.
What's G4:.ngTOn
TODAY
fiEA TRES TDY
MIajestic-Norma Talmadge, Con -
-ad Nagel, William Farnum in "De
3arr a, VWoman of Passion."
Michigan -Beit Wheeler, Robert
Noolsey in "Half-Shot at sunrise."
Wucrth-Conrad Nagel in "Num-
oered Men."
IENERAL
Services- -. At al clhurches.
Faculty concert-At 4:13 o'clock
n Hill auditorium. Arthur Hackett,
;enor, and Wassily Besekirsky, vio-
linist.
Lecture - Fielding H. Yost on
"Your Opportunity," Wesleyan guild,
evening meeting, Wesley hall.
Lecture-Prof. Burke Shartel on
Criminal Respons bility," at :30
O'clock, Congregational Student fel-
towship, church parlors.
Lecturc--Dr. Arthur L. Cross on
"Some Dif-icuities in India," eve-
ning meeting, Harris hall
MONDAY
THEAITRES
Majesie-NUrma Talimacge, Con -
rad Na}el, William Farnumn in "Du
Barry, Wc an of Passion."
Mlich iga-ert Wheeler, Robert
Woolsey in "Half-Shot at Sunrise.
Added feature, 3arbara Stanwvyck
in "Ladies of Leisure."
Trnae vr r noer in "iT zr,_

Al
WednesdayDec. 3rd P.M. at
THE MICHIGAN THEATRE
BID NOW! BID HIGH!
BIDDING CLOSES AT NOON, TUESDAY, DEC. 2nd.
BE SURE TO PLACE THE NUMBER OF THE ARTICLE
ON THE BID TICKET.
SHOW STARTS AT 7 P.M. C OME E A R L Y, AND BE
SURE OF. A SEAT.

i

r
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you get a
The Schultz Grocery
Ernst Bros. Electric Shop
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Hutzel & Co., Plumbing and Heating
Crippen Drug Stores, Inc.
The Michigamme Oil Co.
Kyer Laundry Co.
Stein, Cleaner
Wxigifm Rakrv

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