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November 27, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-27

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PAGE FOUHI

T II E MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1930

1 11

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.7
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Ass.ociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the, use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in thie paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Anu Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of, postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4-s.0
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May
hardI Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, a1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor ...............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ........... Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor................Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor........... Mary L. Behymer
Music, Drama, Books........Wm. J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor ......Harold 0. Warren
Assistant NewsEditor......Charles R. Sprown
Telegraph Editor..........George A. Stauter
Wmn. F. Pyper.. ... . .Copy Editor
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold 0. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters

Walter S. Baer, Jr
Irving J. Blumberg
rhomas M. Cooley
George Fisk
Morton Frank
Said Friedberg
Frank B. Gilbreth
Jack Goldsmith
Roland Goodman
"Morton Helcper
Edga lHornik
ames 1I. I.nglis
DentonC. Kunze
Powers Moulton

Wilbur J. Myers
Robert L. Pierce
Sher Mv. Quraishi
Richard Racine
Jerry E. Rosenthal
George Rubenstein
Charles A. Sanford
Karl Seiffert
Robert F. Shaw
Edwin M. Smith
George A. Stauter
Parkerr Terryberry
ohn S. Townsend
Robert D. Townsend
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean RosentF'-l
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
er Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara XW.right

Lynne Adam.
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
?$mily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hlofiney
Jean Levy
Dorothy Magee
Mary McCall

mutual respect among the houses
which constitute the council. This
would require the council's "pull-
ing itself up by the bootstraps," to
a position where the houses would
look it as really being a parent or-
ganization. If this is not achieved,
the prospects of properly and effi-
ciently enforceing deferred rushing
under the means now provided, are
so slight and of such little promise
that we believe in a short while
the fraternities will be justifiably
shorn of their share in the enforce-
ment of the project. We predict
that, unless a new spirit evolves
within the council, the enforcement
of the deferred rushing plan, as
well as the deferred residence regu-
lations will be allotted the dean's
office, as the agent of the Senate
committee. We believe this despite
the fact that the dean's office now
firmly b;elieves that the control of
rushing should be in the hands of
the Interfraternity council and its
judiciary committee.
The dean's office would insure a
rigorous, fair and complete en-
forcement of the whole deferred
rushing and pledging project, with
a minimum of friction and hard-
feelings. It would delegate this
responsibility to some one individ-
ual who would dispatch it with re-
spect and efficiency.
Should anyone doubt the possi-
bility of the enforcement's being
transferred to the dean's office
provided the fraternities fail to
work together and support the
judiciary committee, he need only
to look at the progress of the auto-
mobile regulation through its var-
ious stages. In the beginning, an
action of theSenate committee was
issued against the driving of auto-
mobiles. The enforcement of the
partial auto ban was left to stu-
dent hands, principally the Stu-
dent council. While it was in thi
stage, the administration quit
justifiably complained of the lax-
ity of its enforcement. Because o
the inability, or unwillingness, o:
the student group to enforce a
measure of such delicacy, the Re
gents were asked to pass the pres
r ent ruling and its enforcemen
" passed from student to University
hands.
The analogy drawn between th
two situations shows some varia
tion in detail and nature, but on
1indisputable fact is disclosed: whe
a measure presented to the cam
pus by the administration is inef
ficiently and negligently enforce
by students, its enforcement mus
logically be taken over by the ad
ministration.
While The Daily predicts tha
sometime in the future it migh
be necessary for the dean's offic
to assume the enforcement of th
deferred rushing regulations, it i
our hope that this will never com
about. We believe that the Inter
fraternity counci has suffi
cient initiative to handle the rush
ing problem itself, a n d tha
specifically, the fraternities hav
the necessary group consciousnes
to conduct their rushing activitie
- in a manner befitting their fine
e nature. We believe that the greate
e majority of the fraternities can de
- velop a sense of responsibility fo
each other, so that they, as a group
e can undertake rushing and othe
s activities, in a creditable manne

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertisinig................. Charles T. Kling
vcrtisi┬▒._................Thomas M. Davi
Advertising. ....William W. Warboys
Service .................Norr-is 3. Johnson
Publication............kobert W. Williamson
Circulation ..............Marvin S. Kobackeu
Accounts.......y............Thomas S. Mui
Business Secretary ............ Mary 3, Kenan

Harry R. Beglev
Vernon Bishop
Williat Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davi
Richard H. Hi~le
Yrle Kightlinger

Assistants
r Don W. Lyon
'Ailliam Morgan
I1. Fred Schaefer
Zichard Stratemneier
is Noel D. Turner
r Byron C. Vcdder
Helen Olsen
Mildred Postal
Marjorie Rough
sser Mary E. Watts
Johanna Wiese

RATD ROLL
HEIGH-HO
THE
DERRY-O
My, My! Here it is another holi-
day, and we've all been admonished
by our coy professors not to eat too
much, and we've all decided that
we will anyway just to gripe the
old wet-crackers, and we are all
going to have about four hours in
which it will be physically imposs-
ible to move, so how about getting
some of those lessons for Friday?
Come on, now, no use avoiding the
issue. You might as well face the
facts right now and get right down
to work. This is your opportunity to
get ahead!
* * *
The thing that has puzzled
me, though, for lo these many
years is how our local butchers
can tell so accurately that all
those turkeys are going to die
of measles about this time of
year. It is a private theory of
mine that the boys go around
innoculating the poor birds at
the judicious moment so that
they can be sure. Perhaps our
friends the Anti-vivisectionist
Leaguers should investigate. In
fact I'm sure they should, then
maybe they'd shut up.
, ~* *
Another racket that I feel needs
some looking into is this plum-
pudding business. Now, every righ
- minded fellow knows that Plum
- Puddings, besides being perfectly
indigestible and devoid of plums
are sacred to the Christmas season
-ask Mr. Dickens, ask Mr. Hoover
ask your old man,-go ahead, ask
-him. I think myself that it is noth
- ing but a gigantic fraud sponsore
s by the English to throttle th
American Mince Pie industry, aid
I fully intend to ask the Politica
f Science department to exercis
f their influence to have an embarg
a placed on the importation of th
- filthy things. I'm sure that a pud
_ ding with an embargo gracing it
t brown, steaming surface woul
y look so silly that no one could b
induced to buy it at any price.
- Another fine feature of this
e suggestion is that it would
n leave a lot of perfectly good
- embargoed plum puddings about
- which could, no doubt be bought
d for practically nothing (and
t used for practically nothing)
- and the University might be
induced to contract for the lot
t of them and plaiter the New-
t berry Auditorium with the
e things.
e
s LOOK! A POEM!
e My mistake, it isn't either (o
- both), I guess I'm just an old false
- alarmist.-Well, what if I am
- Here it is anyway:
t, You have to hand it to the HORS
e He has his weaker points of cours
s But nothing else can have a colt
s You see he isn't such a dolt
r You have to hand it to the HORS:
r Jake.
- Aw. I do not-D. B.
r
ll
s
3.

- Horse (Reading left to right).
e *
s It seems to me that we have
digressed widely from the sub-
- ject of thanksgiving for the
e moment, but maybe that's a
e good idea.
e
- The old boy over at the Law Ciu
has won me over to his cause hear
e and hand. I am told that the othe
ee
f day he attempted to kick out
, class of Architects who were nosin
e about in the ruins of what use
yto be very beautiful rocks and tree
- but have now been converted b
the ruthless hand of man into,
o building whose main hall look
suspiciously like a bowling alley t
. me. It is really worth a few minute
Eof anybody's time to go over to th+
place and stand innocently on th
- premises until he comes along t
scare you away. His gestures borde
1 on the eloquent with practicall
i no baiting at all, and with a littl
persuasion he can be induced t
s call you all manner of lovely name
a of his own devising. Five o'clock i
- i the best hour because he's fresl
e then, and right at the peak of hi
- I form.
VARIUM ET MUTABILE SEMPEE

About Books
THE FECUND MR.
NOAH WEBSTER
Webster's New limernaional Dic-
tionary of the English Languaitge,
1929.
Published by G. C. Merriam Com-
,pany, Springfield, Massachusetts.
Price - Enough all right, all right.
Review Copy from the Michigan
I Daily Library.
Typewriter by Royal; Paper by
Bond; Review set up and printed
by Ann Arbor Press, Maynard
Street (advt.).
You can't start about reading
this book in the usual way. The
publisher, just to inject a little lo-
cal color perhaps, has gone and
printed four pages of plates illus-
trating: a) the official flags of the
United States; b) Great Seals of
the United States and Territories;
c) arms of various nations - in-
cluding Uruguay, Servia, and the
Netherlands; d) arms and flags of
Great Britain and her colonies; e)
flags of various nations, and lastly,
f) yacht club flags of the United
States and Canada .....and all in
a blatant four-color process, with a
dash of gold and silver. Which
is an impertinent gesture on the
part of the editor, excusable only
in a public-pandering press. It as-
sumes that you are too dumb to
know what your country's flag
looks like; it tries to appeal to the
t blind patriotism of the emotional
masses. Though, on the other hand,
who knows; these may be printed
to satisfy the demands of the pic-
ture-loving American reading pub-
lic.
'"What is the good of a book
- without pictures?" said Alice.'
The international Dictionary was
e published in 1890 and again in 1900
The present edition was based on
the earlier ones and is now com-
e pletely revised in all department
o including on pages lxxxi-cxx, a de-
partment of new words with ex-
amples such as Agromyzidaexx
s which Mr. Webster's followers have
d so quaintly described as "a famil
a of small or acalyptrate (which is
not a new word) two-winged flies"
apple blotch, which they have a
"Hort. A disease of apple, tree
caused by the parasitic fungu;
Phyllosticta solitaria ..... "; camp
fire-girl; groceteria; lipstick, an
so forth; and besides all these
dictionary of geography, of bio
graphy, and the whole topped of
with a reference history of t
world.
The style of Mr. Webster and hi
followers is slightly more turgi
than that of the delightful M
Webster whose Sunday Supplemen
comic, "The Man in the Brown Der
r by," has done so much to keep th
- pews empty on hot Sabbaths. Thu
? you -become slightly bewildere
now and then as I did on pag
E 2060 over the following criptic re
e mark,
"Strobiliferous-a. Bearing o
producing strobiles."
E And again on page 884,
"Gall, n. (F galle, noix de gaik
fr. L.galla) A swelling or excres
cence of the tissues of plants re
sulting from the attacks of cer
tam parasites, which cause an ab
normal and sometimes very extra
ordinary proliferation of the cell
of the host plant." Here one's in
terest becomes naturally divert
ed from thegals to the host plant
but the author refuses to claify

I his communication. Begging th
issue, he proceeds rough-shod ove
the demands of the reader's intel
lect, as follows, "Galls are produce
both by vegetable organisms -
We need not proceed further, Th
point in question is obvious enough
In the Dictionary Mr. Webste
deals with a great many prope
names and some that are not s
proper, I fear, among the forme
bof which rank the Nipmucs
t tribe of Algonquin Indians), th
Hupas, Walpurgis, and many other
a who crowd the overflowing page
g in a continuous procession of ever
d increasing awesomeness. The littl
s Hupas are really delightful, bu
y after you have said that, there i
s really not much more to say. Th
perpetual delightfulness on som
C pages give the effect that every
S thing is "sweet and rosy," some
e what even to the Pollyana effec-
thus on page 590 you get in rapid
succession: delight n. delight v. 1
r delight v. i. delighted, delightfu
y delightfully, delightfulness, delight
Sing, delightingly, delightsome, de
lightsomely, deliglhtsorneness .
s Though in the next breath, by re
h fIex perhaps, you may find yoursel
m rurmuring: deliquesce, deliques
cence, deliquescent . . .
However, as no critic will argue
there is nothing particularly orig

rn i

N I

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WATLING
LERCHEN &
HAYES
Members
New York Stock Exchange
Detroit Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
Dealers in
Investment
Securities
Accounts Carried
for Clients

this year
GIVE STATIONERY

If in doubt-give Stationery.
Stationery always finds a wel-
come in the "Christmas Stock-
ing" of any man or woman,
We have a fine display by
EATON, CRANE & PIKE.

Mezzanine Floor
FIRST NATIONAL
BANK BLDG.
Phones: 23221-23222

THE MAYER-SCH AIRER CO.
STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BINDERS
Phone 4515 OFFICE OUTFITTERS 112 S. Main St.

I
i

NOTICE!
Suits Pressed .................30c
Hats Cleaned and Blocked..-..-..50c
All kinds of alterations at cost.
CHAS. DOUKAS
1319 South University

I!-i''

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WE RENT
IWE SERVICERad s
WT LL HR adios
SWESELL
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
Tel. 2-2812 615 E. William
WANT ADS PAY!

TYPEWRITERS
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for all
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Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures best
quality at a moderate price.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

Ann W: Verner
Marian Atran
-i en Bailey
Josephine Convis
Dorothy Laylin
Sylvia Miller

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1930
Night Editor-Harold O. Warren
THE DEFERRED RUSHING
PROPOSAL - 11

In Tuesday morning's Daily we
pointed out some difficulties of en-
forcing the deferred rushing plan
as recently passed by the Inter-
fraternity council. We based the
argument upon the probable lack
of enforcing ability of the judici-
ary committee (which was made
the enforcement agency by the
council) inasmuch as the commit-
tee derives its'powers and backing
from the Interfraternity body. The
council, it is widely agreed, lacks
an enterprising cooperative spirit
among the houses, especially ir
their consideration of the deferrec
rushing project.
The divided responsibility for the
enforcement of the whole deferrec
pledging scheme between the Sen-
ate Committee on Student Affairs,
with its regulations on freshmer
residence and deferred pledging,
and the judiciary committee, with
the council's plan of controlling
rushing and the means of pledging,
is also somewhat intentional in owr
opinion. The enforcement of the
deferred rushing plan, that grou;
of regulations which is to marlk
the boundaries of fraternity actior
in rushing, and in the means 01
pledging itself, is a responsibility,
not of the Senate committee, but
solely of the Interfraternity coun-
cil, acting through its judiciary
committee, itself.
There is little question but that
the Senate committee, which is
representative of the administra-
tion, will give strong moral support
to the judiciary committee. How-
ever, there is no actual connection
between the judiciary committee
and the administration, other than
that the faculty and alumni mem-
bers, who are in a minority, are
selected, from the council's nom-
inations, by the President of the
University. The judiciary commit-
tee, therefore, can not be consider-
ed an agency of the administration.
Its influence must come, almost

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THE HUTCHINS MEMORIAL
Students of the University wi:
issist the Senate committee in it
memorial service for Dr. Harry B
Hutchins, late president-emeritu
which is planned for Friday, Nov
28 in the Lydia Mendelssohn thea
ter. The worth of this enterpris
is obvious and the plans for it
execution are admirable.
Speakers for the memorial serv
ice have been selected from th
roster of friends whom the lat
leader accepted as among his clos
companions. Included in the im
posing list are Shirley W. Smith
vice president and secretary of th
University and lifelong friend o
the deceased; Earl D. Babst, '93
chairman of the board of th
American Sugar Refining compan
and close friend of the former pres
ident; Dr. William Oxley Thomp
son, president emeritus of Ohi
State university and a personal a
well as professional friend of Dr
Hutchins.
Dr. Hutchins died on January
25, 1930, his demise being of sud
den and great importance through
out the educational world. Loca
friends were shocked and immed
iately sympathetic as the new
broke in the city and for weeksa
series of written tributes supple-
mented the oral admiration for one
of the University's foremost lead-
ers.
Next Friday's service will not be

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