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November 22, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-22

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PAGE FOUR

THiE HICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAYi NUVEiMI3IR 22, 1930

........ . . ---- - - - - --- -

Published every morning except Monday I
luring the University year by the Board in
Control of StudentsPublications.t7
Member of Western Conference Editoriall
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitleda
to the use for republication of all news dis'
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in thie paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.oo; by mail,
$4-s.5
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May,
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor..............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director.......... Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor..............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor...........Mary L. Behymer
Music, Drama, Books........Wm. J. Gorman
Assistant Cicy Editor ......Harold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraob Editor. ......George A. Stauter
Wm. F. Pyper .Copy Editor
S. Beach Conger John 1). R~eindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold 0. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters

collegiate competition. Their natur-
al result would be the production
of Varsity teams by individual and
intramural routes, as a normal out-
come of previous competition. While
these views will undoubtedly draw
out a barrage of criticism from en-
trenched athletic quarters, the
courage with which P r e s i d e n t
Ruthven has taken this stand indi-
cates the temper of his convictions,
which should not be denied the
privilege of assuming a practical
form at Michigan.
ganization the change that has
taken place from a student activity
to a university function; over-em-
phasis may be reduced by encour-
aging intramural sports and indi-
vidual games and professionalism
may be avoided by ceasing to stage
competitions as public spectacles,
treating them rather as voluntary
student activities within the physi-
cal education program; and since
the staff is best fitted through
knowledge of its aims to develop
the institution as a whole, athletics
including intercollegiate competi-
tion should be placed in the same
relation to the university as its
other departments.
We commend these views to the
support of the student body gen-
3rally, and submit that their im-
mediate expression in practice
would go far toward ameliorating
Campus Opinion
ContribIutor s lie as~ked to be brief,
confining thcmsel esato lss than 300
wordsi f possible. Anonymous con-
niunications wxill b e disregarded]. The
names of corunicants will, however,
be regarded as conidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not he
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.

TODAY
SATURDAY

,r

MUSICAND DA
4~4ija~ D A l

Ili

....I

Walter S. Baer, Jr.
Irving J. Blumberg
Thomas M. Cooley
George Fisk
Morton Frank
Satil Friedherg
Frank B. Gilbreth
Jack Goldsmith
Roland Goodman
James H. Inglis
Denton C. Kunze
Wilbur J. Myers
Robert L. Pierce
Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Smily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoffmeyer
jean Levy
orothy Magee
Mary McCall

Sher M. Quraishi
Jerry L. Rosenthai
Giorge Rubenstein
Charles A. Sanford
Karl Seiffert
Rtober t 1E. Shaw
Edwin M. Smith
George A. Stauter
Alfred R. Tapert
Parker Terryberry
Tohn S. Townsend
Robert D. Townsend
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosentbal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

Yes sir, here it is Saturday again.j
I never should have thought to see
the day when Saturday turned upj
on time like this two weeks in a
row, but here it is Saturday again
-say, it is Saturday isn't it?
LOOK what I got, fellows, no less
than a poem-no more either.
Way out West where the Coyote
thrives
Where men are men and
women are wives
There lived a boy who had for
a pet
A cross-eyed bear whose eyes-
nearly met
When asked his name he re-
plied quite sadly
He guessed he'd have to call
him 'Gladly.'
I asked him why, at his answer
you'll stare,
"Why, sir, in church they al-
ways sing
GLADLY THE CROSS-EYED
BEAR."
From
JUST A Coed.
(If hardly that-D. B.)
* *
My God Baxter: (It's nice to be
looked up to-D. B.)
All our Drug Stores are going
haywire at once. Behold the fol-
lowing taken from the windows of
two of our indigenous apothecaries:
OUR FOUNTAIN IS FAMOUS
FOR IT'S CHOCOLATE
Raggedy Andy.
In the columns of one of our
very finest Ann Arbor after-
noon Dailies I observe the fol-
lowing comment which seems
to me to be an unusually swift
and to-the-point cerroboration
of the theories of one Dr. Ruth-
ven of local fame in the Dog-
Licenses-for-Students League.
"It is estimated that a crowd
of ,000 will view the contest
Saturday in case the weather
is favorable."
Mr. Tillotson will now lead
us in a few moments'cf silent
prayer for rain.
* * *
Look, look, look, look? ! !
MICHIGAN DAMES HEAR
TALK ON CHINESE RUGS

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advcrtsiig .................Charles T. Kline
AdvertisiB..........Thomas M. Davis
Advertising...........W.illiam W. Warboys
Service.............. .... Norris J. Johnson
Publication...........Robert W. Williamson
Circulation...............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts.................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary.............Mary J. Kenan
Assistants

Harry R. Beglev
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davis
Richard H. Hiller
Erle Kightlinger

Don W. Lyon
William Morgan
11.Fred Schaefer
Richard Stratemeier
Noel 1). Turner
Byron C. Vedder

IS VIVISECTION SCIENTIFIC?
To the Editor:i
I should be very grateful if you
would allow me sufficient space in
your paper to express a few ideas
about vivisection.
Recently I have been forced to
listen to the cries of dogs, presum-
ably being experimented upon,
howling piteously and wailing for
hours. I have asked students for
their views upon the subject of
vivisection. They almost all re-
gretted that this terrible type of
research existed upon the campus
but they seemed to have the vague
idea that it was necessary for the
continued welfare of humanity and
the education of medical students
That is utterly untrue. Vivisection
is unscientific. It is a product of
what G. K. Chesterton, in his re-
cent lecture on modern methods of
thought called the "Age of Unrea-
son" to which he asserted that
many scientific men belong. The
whole n rninle of vivisection is

Ann W. Verner Helen Olsen
Marian Atran Mildred Postal
Ielen Bailey Marjorie Rough
Josephine Convisser Mary E. Watts
Dorothy Laylin Johanna Wiese
Sylvia Miller
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1930
Night Editor-BEACH CONGER, Jr.
"ATHLETICS FOR ALL"

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President Ruthven's recent diag- s J. V
PosiadndiRcthentsfhentodn- utterly and lamentably unscientific.
trol and development of intercol- If you wanted to find the cause of
legiate athletics stand unmistak- a given disease would the most
aleasthe most incisive and per- logical method be, to try and pro-
able as I otmiieadpr duce a similar or identical disease
spicacious analysis of the problem dnea digilrmouse? th rydise
made in recent months. Further in a dog or mouse? The theory is
perhps o snerand onet atijfalse and of necessity extremely
perhaps no saner and honest atti- cruel. The vivisectors seem to no-
tude could have been framed for glect or overlook the fact that
eliciting the enthusiastic support human an'd animal organisms are
of normal, intelligent undergradu- radically different and consequent-
ates than his present arraignment ly substances which cause disease
of athletic elephantiasis, the big- or death in human beings are
business tactics used in making sometimes quite harmless to some
public spectacles of intercollegiate animals. For instance, rabbits
sports, and general administrative thrive on belladonna while citric
policies now in vogue. thideants a onn ct c
After citing such evils of the acid acts as a poison on cats.
present system as the "forced" No discoveries of value to hu-
athletic plans erected for their ad- nanity wer ,,ever made as a result
vertising and money values, and of vivisection. Sir Frederick Treves,
complaints against activities of notorious vivisector, said that when
professional coaches, the wasted he tried to apply to human beingL
time of the student, the money in- the knowledge of the working of
volved, the methods of securing the bowels which he had obtained
athletes, the necessity for revising from countless experiments of a
the definition of amateur status, very cruel nature which he had
all of which inevitably destroy the performed ongdogs he had to un-
true spirit of play, Dr. Ruthven learn and forget it all. Thus all this
concluded t h a t competition in suffering of the dogs was entirely'
sports has run away with us. While useless and is, in itself, a very good,
he promptly asserts that intercol- answer to the question often asked
legiate athletics is not an unmixed by vivisectors, "Would you rather'
evil to be done away with, he does have human beings or dogs suf-j
hold that the problem is to "de- fer?" The dogs suffering does not
fiate the whole program to a point save the human beings suffering
where it will take its proper place butrather causes it, as in the case
in institutions devoted to instruc- where Sir Frederick tried to apply
tion and study.,, his knowledge and found it did not
lHe finds in the growth of inter- work.
est in individual participation in The vivisectors when attacked
games a partial solution of the will try to convince you that they
principal difficulties; in encourag- are not cruelalthough they have
ing intramural sports, "the promo- always admitted that there used to
ters of intercollegiate sports have be a lot of cruelty. The operations
really dug the grave of their pro- are admittedly performed under
ject, and have ... contributed to anaesthetics but it is after recover-
the solution of the problem of ing from some operation such as
over-production for which they having its bowel blocked that the
are responsible." He advocates curb- animal suffers agony.
ing the practice of advertising in- I am convinced that animals
tercollegiate games to the general suffer in this way, supposedly for
public to obtain more money for the sake of science, on our campus.
facilities. This torturing and offering of
"Intercollegiate c o m p e t i t i v e dumb animals as a sacrifice to the
sports can never be justified as a God of science is needless and
spectacle for adults even in tax- ought to be stopped.

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GOODIE,-IT'S WILLIE!
Dear Dan,
They are putting Harding on a
postage stamp. Would suggest Al
Capone, holding an olive brancl.'
Also Nan Britton ought to have her
picture on something. Harding may
not have been father of his coun-
try, but he tried hard in his own
simple way.
For the Black List:
The coed who has calmly appro-
priated my seat in Poli. Sci. I (and
boy! how I hope she sees this).
Buddy Rogers.
Edgar Guest (who, in today's
Free Press, was compared to de
Maupassant). If this be treason
make the most of it.
Well, Dan, I'm getting pretty
sick of all this deriding of coeds.
I wish, in the interest of science,
to go into this thing myself. On
next Sat. night at 8 o'clock I will
stand outside the Mich. Any coed
who will stand in the lobby alone,
wearing a red hat shall meet me
in person. Line forms at the right.
Into the dawn of a new tomorrow,
Dan.
Willie.
Thanks much, Willie, you know
we all love and admire you, but I
shudder at your despicable defec-
tion from the ranks of the Coed
Defamers, inc. Perhaps you don't
know any coeds, though, so well be
lenient.
Mr. Baxter:
Two articles have come to my
notice. Your campaign against
co-eds, and the Washtenaw
Trib's accusation of this Uni-J
versity as a "hotbed of vivisec-
tion." I had not noticed the
second fact mentioned, but evi-
dently the Trib is worried over
an impending shortage of
board-house provender. Why
not play one fact off against
the other (you see what I
mean?) thus silencing both
your's and the Tribune's cease-
less yawp.
Artie.

'ROLLO'S WILD OAT'
The very popular reception that
.as granted Play Production's per-
formance of Claire Kummer's farce,
'Rollo's Wild Oat" last week-end
has prompted a repetition of the
roduction tonight in the Mendels-
sohn Theatre. The play in a very
-ompetent farce manner deals with
the woes of an adolescent who
squanders his fortune on a pro-
duction of "Hamlet" but falls in
love with the Ophelia, a miserable
actress who likes to sew.
CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER
A Review by William J. (A orinan.
The importance of acting as an
art has been considerably obscured
by the Gordon Craig lust for stag-
ing. It should be a great day then
for actors when a Ruth Draper o
a Cornelia Skinner so thoroughly
vindicates their oft-disputed and
oft-damned art. For these artists
manage theveryessence of drama
ith the body alone. They drive
at the very heart of several realities
with no apparatus of any kind. In
the light of such an evening as
Miss Skinner afforded a large auc-
ence last night, the laboured real-
ism of theatre or even the success-
ful stylization seem for the moment
a litftle pathetic. That uncompro-
mising, typical League red chair
became, by the imaginative force
of a great actress, quite completely
a ship-rail and a Pontiac back- -
seat.
Vaudeville artists made the old
monologue," done in an intense
and unbearably wierd chant (the
extra spoken chorus to "a pal aftr
all is a pal after all), a menace.
Miss Draper and Miss Skinner have
made it a satisfying art-form where
personal intelligence and personal
2echnique can find a happy focus.
Miss Skinner's conceptions-from
"he pathos of the New York poor
.n their Sunday automobile to the
ld Woman at Monte Carlo, senile
nerves and greedy eyes - are all
precisely imagined and articulated.
Miss Skinner is very thoroughly
the mistress of the chameleon's
magic. She adapts herself to a pro-
gram oimpersonations with ab-
sence of effort and certainty of
aim. Her ear for accent, pitch, and
tempo of different characters' tal
-the English lecturer, the Phila -
delphia mother, the Barbadoes girl
-is infallible. Voice and mask to-j
gether are sufficiently flexible to1
give, so to speak, the rythm of
several personalities. Fine sugges-
tive gestures indicate other people,
indicate life and make monologt e'
drama.
Hersketches are carefully, swift-
ly ordered. They are filled with ex-
perience, with intelligent satiric
comment. They are sincere, and
spontaneous. Her technique of act-
ing gives them fine pattern.
The program very nicely ranges
from gracious humour, almost fan-
tasy (in the sketch of the English
Explorer of Africa lecturing cas-
ually to Americans) to satire on the
garrulity and vacuity of the Amer-
ican woman. The humour is charm-
ing (though that of the Goody-
Byes from the Boat Rail is a bit
obvious and familiar). The satire
is incisive, yet stays on the better
side of malice.
She is most significant, however,
when she tries, in the Ruth Draper
manner, for sompething deeper than
humour, satire or impersonation-
for the pointed revelation of char-
acter. The New York peasant
woman, vainly struggling with
brawling children and a snarling
husband (whom she loves) in an

effort to "enjoy the country," the
Barbadoes woman with a heredi-
tary taint, and the feverish lady at
Monte Carlo working out a system,
were the finest things on the pro-
gram.
Miss Skinner's beauty as a lin-
guist, clear enough throughout the
program, was beautifully summed
up in a reading of Emile Verhaer-
1 en's "Le Vent" when the wind lit-
erally whistled through lovely vocal
inflections.
FACULTY RECITAL POSTPONED
The Faculty concert announced
for Sunday afternoon, has been
postponed one week, out of respect
for Dr. Arthur W. Stalker whose
funeral will take place Sunday
afternoon. The concert will be
given one week later, Sunday after-
noon, November 30, at 4:15 o'clock.
At that time the program will be
provided by Arthur Hackett, tenor,
Wassily Besekirsky, violinist with
I piano accompaniments by Con-
stance Hackett and Mabel Ross
Rhead.
Beginning with this postponed
concert which will be given Novem-

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niT n t r , ,. iriM
m tri itr r frt ft : ';ar ' t'(fi ,, n
~4~ r

Detroit Syir
Orchesi
Gabrilowitsch, Condu
Monday, Nov. 24
8:15%Lv P. M.
"One of America's most valuable mus-
ical assets," under the baton of a world
renowned conductor who has achieved
musical immortality in two fields-
piano virtuoso and orchestra conductor.
Tickets $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50

:ctor

nphony
tra

777777'.

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts..
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"IMMORTALITY"
Dr. Fisher
Dr. Arthur W. Stalker will be buried
from the Church at 3:30 o'clock.
The body will lie in state from
1:30 until 3:15 o'clock.
There will be no Evening Worship.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEYAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
Due to the death of Dr. Arthur W.
Stalker, all student activities sched-
uled for Sunday, Nov. 23 will be
cancelled.

iI

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Altars of Thanksgiving."
12:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's meet-
ing. Speaker: Lowell J. Carr, pro-
fessor of sociology.
6:30 P. M.-Senior Young People's
Discussion Group Topic: "Chris-
tianity and the Family."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, November 3

11

I

Season

Tickets $6.00, $8.00, $10.00,
$12.00

OSSIP
GABRILOWITSCH

/v.

F.5|i

E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister
Students.

of

9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach. Topic:
"Thanksgiving Transfigured"
12:00 N.-University Students' Class
at Guild House.
5.30 P. M.-Friendship Hour at
Guild House.
6:30 P. M.-Dr. Ora S. Duffendack
will speak to students Guild on
"The Character of Judas as Por-
trayed in the Oberammergau Pas-
sion Play."
A cordial welcome to all students.
BETHLEHEMj
EVANGELICAL CHURCHj
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M'.-Bible School.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
Sunday Lecture Service 11:15 A. M.
Address by Rabbi Bernard Heller.
Topic: "Why Religion."
7:30 P. M.-Open Forum. Address
by Prof. John H. Muyskens.
9:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

10:45 A. M.-Morning
Sermon topic: "The
Code," based upon the
Matin Flavin.

Worship.
Criminal
play by

9:30 A. M.-Church School. Spe-
cial Thanksgiving Service. Parents
invitoc, Illustrated story by Mr.
Heaps. "The Man Who Played
God."
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship.
E. Blythe Stason, J. D., speaking
on "The Regulation of Radio
Broadcasting."

LI.

a g ._ y _ ._ _ _.a _. _ i

BE
CONSISTENT
IN YOUR
RELIGION
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARILY

10:00 A.
Sermon:
Task."

M.-Morning
"Life's Day

Worship.
and Its

11:00 A. M.-Service in German.
7:00 P. M. - Young People's
League.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-Service with sermon
by the pastor on "Heavenly Citizen-
ship."
A.49P M .-Studer urndv hour.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan . Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall.)
9:30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock.)
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer; ser-
mon by Mr. Lewis.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall. Speaker, Professor
Paul M. Cuncannon.
7:45 P. M.-Evensong and Address.
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
November 23, 1930
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.
1 1 -00 A_ M.-orin Wosh

Good work Artie-and my good-
ness gracious! How prolific you are.
Well, here you go breaking into
print again:
Mr. Baxter:
Is it at all necessary to con-
tinue your campaign to remove

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Soul and
Body."
111:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.

I

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