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November 14, 1930 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-14

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MRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1930
HTR|VE UTL[E -S
COLLEGEPOLICIES,
PLAS FOB FUTURE
Discusses Numerous Educational
Projects for Betterment
of Institution
SPEAKS BEFORE FORUM
Suggests Proposition by Which
Delinquent Freshmen
May be Aided.
Since the life of a university re-
flects the life of the world at large,
we can assume that the direction
that college education is taking is
fundamentally raht, P r e s i d e n t
Alexander G. Ruthven stated yes-
terday afternoon before an All-
Campus forum on the subject,
"Plans and Policies of the Univer-
sity"
Among other definite projects for
the betterment of the institution,
President Ruthven explained a plan
by which he hopes to obviate the
n e c e s s i t y of sending delinquent
freshmen home at the middle of
the year. He stated his desire to
create the office of student councel-
lor or advisor who would help stu-
dents evercorhe some of the prob-
lems that are -holding them back,
through no fault of their own, how-
ever.
Discusses Leading Questions.-
Although describing the general
lines along which progress will be
made, President Ruthven empha-
sized the fact that he had only had
a little more than a year to formu-
late his ideas on administration and'
that many projects were still in anQ
embryonic state. However, he took
up and discussed qv estions of the
condition of the faca.ty, retirement
pensions, research and its place in
the university, organization of the
administration, the new office of
student councellor, alumni relations,
and entrance requirements.
In discussing the faculty, the
speaker brought out the p o i n t, c
that while it was true that the
u n i v e r s i t y had lost a consider-c
able number of prominent men re-
cently by death and retirement, the Y
condition of the university teach-
ing staff at present, nevertheless, e
was better than it has ever been in
the history of the institution. Some
of the losses of professors to other s
colleges, President Ruthven ex- r
plained, have been occasioned mere- "A
ly by the fact that there were, for o
example, more men in a depart- h
ment of a certain caliber than the n
university had use for. He stated,
however, that there was a great f
need for certain key men.
Cites Disappointing Cases.
The speaker's discussion of the o
e n t r a n c e requirement situation i
hinged on thet same idea as the
proposition of a student councellor, 1
namely the ideal of decreasing ap-
preciably the number of scholastic
failures, among the freshman class f
fn particular. It is not so much a
matter of raising the requirements, p
he continued, as it is selecting the p
type of men and women of ambi-
tion and high moral character that
the university can mould into in-
telligent and useful citizens. He em-
phasized the number of bitterly dis-
appointing cases that had come to
his attention and p o i n t e d o u t
whereby many of them could have
be'en avoided.

In approaching the t e n - y e a r
building program fo Wulated two
years ago by the alumni, President
Ruthven made it clear that he was
Rir from being satisfied with the
provisions of the plan. The newly
authorized office of di'rector of plant
extension, he pointed out, would
provide a means by which the uni-
versity could have a building pro-.
gram that would be suited exactly
to the needs of the university. The
expert in charge of plant extension
w/ould see that every building was
constructed to meet the p r e c i s e
needs for which it was planned.
Sweetland
SODAS
CANDIES
LUNCHES
The Best in Town
212 South Main

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREW

LONDON ROUN ABLE CONFERENCE, '[VUIDIT OF( Pl( DR. BE LL SPEAKS
T DECIDE INDIA'S DESTINY, OPENED AIII i u LL LTRE NDS
^ ..sor D c;.sses New Economic
SWL ET of Women.

Hillel Group to Give
Annual Formal Dance
Plans for a first annual formal
dance, to be sponsored by the Hillel
foundation, were announced yester-
day by E. Al Miller, '32, chairman of
the social committee. The week be-
fore Christmas has been chosen as
the time of the affair.

Charts by Students, Professional ! 15 gradusisygutting away
c; tt1e a nm.znthat every
Drawings Included wonan will mnrry, stated Dr. Mar-
in Display. ret Dell, advisor in physical edu-
eO , for women, yesterday during
Color as displayed i_ ,zthe University radio hour, in point-
of nature will be featured in the 'ig o, hat the last two or three
dceecies have zitnessed a marked
color exhibition scheduled to coen change of attitude in regard to the
today in the architectural buding economic status of women.
Prof. H. A. Fowler, of the decra- tatis cs. she said, in 1920 shov,
tive design departmeni, announced that GG.3 per cent of all women
yesterday. marry. The siatieties from Vassa.
Charts by students of the school show that 69.6 per c t of all grad
uates wed.
and drawings by professional de- Another social trend that has
signers will also be included in the Ibeu increasingly pronounced sine
exhibit. The nature sp;ecmns are the World war, she pointed out, i
being shown through the coutesv the tendency for both the man anc
of the University n:useum ;of na- woman to continue as economi(
tural history anc natural ience partners ater marriage. "Figures
- show that about 40 per cent of al'
he added, while the chants and women will be single and self-
drawings will be selected :f_ cx- supporting for life. This mean.
amples submitted by the students ..t 75 per cent of all women will
and exhibitors, at some time, work for wages," she
The specimens will be disployed said.
in the first floor corridicgs io the
architecture school and will ie UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-
open to the public until Thanks- Lotus D. Coffman, president of th,
giving day. Professor Fowler is university, went on record recently
being aided in the ex.hitbition by B. as being opposed to post-season
T. Bittinger, also of the decorae ive charity football games. Head coach
design department of the Univers- I. O. Chrisler also pronounced him-
ity. -elf in o ofsitin

ALVWAYS GOOD 1
Qftlsiu Soms fo, ae N 'eandMChildrea are always goodbu
etqieoisie N e mTo de fmm f&e grade leathers which -w1 gimw)
,mrow oaaf & .Y m can aino find at Kinws stow..o.4ov I
v~iey ofd w est ad smartest styles of the season.f
\ Oa...fih.eiedig~eaBstytes
sA ladies al ehr C[sn-
"'Calfskin.ptrineddt
31bffs t oweesule 3w f-$2
w '- 1 .10ain Sti

Es h 7k Ie

Associated Press Photo
The round-table conference, designed to decide the destiny of India,
opened in London with Prime Ministe: Ramsay MacDonald (upper left)
chosen to preside over the deliberations. Among those prominent at the
conference are: The Gaekwar of Baroda (upper right), the Maharaja of
Patiala (lower left), ruLing prince of the Punjab, and Wedgewood Benn
(lower right), secretary of state for India.
OCTOBER HEALTH SERVICE REPORT
SHOWS INCREASEOF 3,000 CASES

ANN ARBOR'S LEAD
Choice Turkeys, Geese
for THANk
The Best Obtainab

LNG MEAT MARKET
Ducks and Chickens
KSGIVING
C -t Popular Prices

Greater Tendency to Maintain Sensitivity determinations
Good Health Causes...................... 109 35
Large Gain. X-ray examinations .. 463 360 J. P. ESCHE
Refractions ............235 156
Reports show that 3,000 m o r e Room calls ..............188. 152
cases were treated at the Health Physiotherapy treatments 752 660
Service during October this year in
comparison to the same month last
year.
This increase is not due to any-R
pidemic but rather to the general
endency to maintain good health,
tated Dr. Warren E. Forsythe. di-
ector of the Health Service. "Our
work is changing from the treating
of serious illness to makling annual
health examinations and caring for
minor complaints," he adde d.
The October report tends to con-
irm the following ideas:
1. Adequate medical service for
any group has yet to be determined.
Necessary service seems to be reck-
oned only by the extent to which
t is availlable.
2. "Contagions" and frank sick- EXPERT TYPEV
ness are becoming less and less im-
portant in the health work.
The figures of the report are as
follows:
1930 1129
Dispensary calls...... 10,536 7,502
Prescriptions filled ... 1,523 1,300 SOUTH STATE STREET
Mental Hygiene confer-
ences..............696 87

quality and Service Unexceh'ed
PHONE 4159

LBACH

J. J. DESMONED
202 East Huron Street

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RITER REPAIRING
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PHONE 3814

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ON MEN'S AND LADIES' NEW FALL
STYLES

WE MUST CUT DOWN OUR STOCK-YOU SAVE

U _______

$10.00 STYLES
Going at
$7.90 & $8.45
200 PAMRS
$7.50 and $8,00 Styles
Now $ 5.90

SIX LOTS
New $10.00 Shoes
Now $7.90
100 PAIRS
Were $7 and $8
Now $4.90

Ell

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III III I

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