100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER $, 1930

T R P m T r T4T C A 1\T fi 1 b T Y V

!9 A ^IM

SAUDY O E B 90a AA a.. IA LVIZ. H IN4 U I Li

PAGE

E T]

H09 1 OHIOEXPLOSION ENTOMBS SCORES OF WORKERS
I ~IN NC). 6 MINE OF SUNDAY CREEK COAL COM",,lPANYk.PEPL 6ET'

~ALti!

i~~ LTRITES
7'c~m of C o Coi Explo sion

i
i
i
k i

What's

ii

A i
1O jALBAT

tiSre d

Start

Nation's Head Proclaims Holi.
day; Declares United States
Has Cause for Rejoicing.
SEEKS HELP FOR POOR
We Have Gained in Prevention
of Disease, Protection
of Childhood'.
(By Asociatcd Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 7-President
Hoover today called upon the people
of the United States to observe

RE~~hF WP.73BUSY

Thanksgiving Day by extending aid
to those who are in need and suf-
fering from causes beyond their
control.
In this annual Thanksgiving Day
proclamation, the Chief Executive
said this country has many causes
for Thanksgiving. He added that as
a nation "we have suffered far less
than other peoples from the present'
world difficulties."
Proclamation.
"By the President of the United1
States, a proclamation.
"Notwithstanding that our fore-
fathers endured the hardships and
privations of a primitive life, sur-
rounded by dangers and solaced
only with meager comforts, they
nevertheless bequeathed to us a cus-
tom of devoting one day of every
year to universal Thanksgiving to
almighty God for the blessing of
life itself and the means to sustain
it, for the sanctuary of home and
the joys that pervade it, and for
the mercies of His protection from
accident, sickness or death.t
"Our country has many causes forc
Thanksgiving. We have been blest
with distinctive evidence of divinek
favor. As a nation we have suffered
far lessethan other peoples from
the present world difficulties. We
have been free from civil and in-r
dustrial discord. The outlook ford
peace between nations has beenc
strengthened. In a, large view wec
have made progress upon the en-
during structure of our institutions.t
The arts and sciences that enrichf
our lives and enlarge our control ofi
nature have made notable advances.s
Education has been further extend-
ed. We have made gains in the pre- f
vention of disease and in the pro-(
tection of childhood.c
Seeks Aid for Needy. a
"Now, therefore, I, Herbert Hoov-
er, President of the United States I
of America, do hereby designatet
Thursday, Nov. 27, 1930, as a nation-
al day of thanksgiving, and do en-
join the people of the United States
so to observe it, calling upon them
to remember that many of our peo-
ple are in need and suffering from
causes beyond their control, and
suggesting that a proper celebra-
tion of the day should include that
we make sure that every person in
the community, young and old, shall
have cause to give thanks for our
institutions and for the neighborly
sentiments of our people.
"In witness whereof, I have here-
unto set my hand and caused to be
affixed the seal of the United States..
"Done at the City of Washington,
this sixth day of November, in the
year of Our Lord 1930, and of the
independence of the United States
of America, the 155th.
"(Signed). Herbert Hoover.
By the President; (Signed) Henry
L. Stimson, Secretary of State.
Educational Fraternity
Plans Future Program
Members of the Kappa chapter
of Phi Epsilon Kappa, national.
honorary physical education fra-
ternity, met Thursday at the Union
to organize their program for the
year. An extensive discussion of
plans occupied the meeting.
The fraternity' is professional and
is interested in the elevation of
standards, ethics, and ideals for
professionals engaged in teaching
physical education.
Meetings will be held on two
Thursdays each month during the
remainder of the year, it was de-!
cided. The chapter announced
itself eager to be of service to any
individual or organization inter-
ested in physical education.
At the beginning of the season
teams coached by Howard Jones,
now Southern California football
coach, had won 118 games, lost 24,1
and tied nine.

j P I'

r1MTILLFEL. .. ov 7.--Millfield
.. ..today buried its dead while officials
began their investigations to de-
- ermine the cause of the mime ex-
liosion which claimed at least 79
lives.
' Fedenl, state and county officials
Sh sou ht to learn what caused
y bl"aq i l t N.mil of t>l
aY1rokCr o al1Co. and the re-
o of gas which filled the under-
' ound tunnels Wednesday after-
N Tcres of hushed funeral proces-
*-s w re the only evidences of the
tetoday. The feverish activity
f the last two days, the constant
:Oor rescue crews, the patrols of
SNational Guard, the dispensing
/ -i( coffee and blankets and the ten-
:ion of the waiting crowds had giv-
'= .en way. The guardsmen withdrew
- ~Thursday night together with most
Formation of gas n the 1~hi. 6 mine of the Sunl1ay Creek Coal Cemny, 1cIt .. Of the Red Cross, Salvation Army
have caused the explosion last Wednesday which clai rmed more than 80 lxvcs. Above s a u, ctrXe and other relief workers as their
of the No. 6 entrance, where tb e miners were entombed. - tasks were ended.
-_ J. J. Forbes, director of the Fed-
eral Bureau of Mines at Pittsburgh.
RESEARCH EXPEPTS, iSTUDENTS VIEW National Rese- Th was in charge of the Federal in-
E IGvestgation, assisted by W. E. Smith
Fe___________head of the Ohio Bureau of Mines.
.C. . Fellow,illLofl 1 Another inquiry was directed by
Commercial Fishing in Lake Erie vealing some of the work required Exnect Will T. Blake, state director of in-
And Lake Michigan Are to catch the lakes' 20 million pounds dustrial relations, while Coroner L.
Depicted b Photos of edible fish that is valued at two Dna l F. Jones, of Athens County, planned
Depctd yPots.Dr.Eileen Erlansonnationare-aninquest.
9m ili d rlla c rlo ;Y" ,+ . ._

On
Theaters.
Majestic-"Life of the Party"
with Winnie Lightner.
Michigan-"Queen High" with
Wuerth-"Girl of the Golden
West" with Ann Harding.
Lydia Mendelssohn-O n g a w a
Japanese players.
Organizations.
Aeronautical society-Lecture at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 1042
East Engineering building.
Chemical engineers-Smoker an('
radio party at 1:30 o'clock this af-
ternoon in 3201 East Engineering
building.

Fresmin il1 Meet Wednes
Nig tt to E ct Leaders
for Games.
EX-CAPTAINS TO SPEA
With Black Friday but a w
away, the freshmen and sop
mores are beginning their orgy
zation for the annual fall ga
on south Ferry field, next Sa

Social.
Union-Dancing from
until midnight.
League-Dancing from
until midnight.

N

9 o'clock
9 o'clock

FOUNDATION SEES
IMPROVED SPORTS
Carnegie Official Says Checkup
Shows Less Corruption.
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 7.--The recruit-
ing and subsidizing of athletes, ma-
jor evils in college sports pointed
out by the famous "Bulletin 23" of
the Carnegie foundation a year ago,
are on the wane, according to Dr.

More than 50 students and re-1
search experts yesterday saw mo-
tion picture of fish investig ationsi
c o n d u c t e d in Michigan Waters,
shown in the University muoeums

u a unar. inie importance o
the steam power boat in gill ne
fishing was depicted with picture
of "expert hands salvaging dropper
with a dip scoop." Following th
extracting of fish from the mes

af
e
h

building. The pictures were the,,first with hand hooks, as explained by
I the movie, the expedition is given
of a series of four showings that, over to the unloading, dressing and
will feature the season pro-semi- packing of the edible water inhabi-
nars on "Fish and Fisheries" con- tants.
ducted by Dr. Carl L: Hubbs, curator, _
of fishes in the University museum Tolstoy Cub to Hear
of zoology.
Photographed by Walter Hastings, Lecture by Onderdonk
the pictures depicted commercilal
fishing conditions in Lake Erie and "The Dawning Era's Prophets,
in Michigan waters. The first reel H. G. Wells and L. N. Tolstoy," will
showed gulls "graceful in the air, be the subject of the illustrated lec-
but prim and dumpy on terra ture to be given by Dr. Francis S.
firma," as the titles described them, Onderdonk, of the College of Archi-
Close-ups of nests, eggs and little tecture, before the Tolstoy league
ones were revealed, partly in natur- at 4:15 o'clock Tuesday in room 231
al color. Angell hall.
Photos of fishing in Michigan wa- The address will mark an observ-
ters pictorially explained the opera- ance of the twentieth anniversary
tions of the gill net, as well as re- of Tolstoy's death.

search fellow in the Michigan de-
partment of botany, will return to
I Ann Arbor this month irenI Lon-
sdon where she has been cducting
research work in genetic, par-
Iticularly the genus rosa, at the
John Innes Horticultural institu-
tion.
=Dr. Erlanson went abroad as a
member of the University delega-
tion to the fifth international
botanical congress which was held
this summer at Canbridge Univers-
ity. Other representatives of the
department at this meeting, at
which some of the world's greatest
botanists were present, were Dr. D.
V. Baxter, Dr. C. A. Arnold, Dr.
Bessie B. Kanouse, and Dr. W. R.
Taylor.
Since 1884 Yale and Dartmouthl
have been playing occasional games,
but the Green has never won one
of these contests. The best Dart-
mouth has been able to do was tie
the Eli, 14-14, in 1924.

Smith said there were two possi- otebulin
Smit sad terewer tw posi-Howard J. Savage, princilpal author E
ble causes of the explosion-ignition of the bulletin.
of either gas or coal dust. An open oAlthough the foundation claims
flame could ignite the gas, while no credit for the change -that has
coal dust could be set off only by taken place since the publication of
an ae liht, e sad. .hat sensational sport survey on
anar__gh_,___said.Oct. 24, 1929, Dr. Savage said yester-
day that a partial checkup of con-
Ricenl6acher Receives ditions of the colleges has shown
Congressional Medal that there is less recruiting and
subsidizing than there was a year
(1 1 Associated Press) ago. He declined, however, to am-
WASHINGTON, Nov. 7. -Captain plify the general statement or cite
Edward V. Rickenbacher, America's specific examples.
ianking World War ace, yesterday The Carnegie foundation now is
was presented with the Congression- engaged in following up its ori'ginal
al medal of honor while about him investigation and evaluating prog-
clustered veteran fliers whom he i ress made, using letters to the pres-
led on the western front to the larg- idents of the institutions and a few
est number of victories of any personal visits, made at the request
American squadron. of college officials, to get the in-
The presentation was made by formation.
President Hoover, who faced a chill-
ing wind at Bolling Field to attend MICHIGAN STATE COLLEGE -
the elaborate ceremonies in honor The sophomores recently overcame
of the tighter credited with 26 vi- a larger freshman force to win the
tories in the air during the World annual class games by a 70 to 451
War. score.

day morning.
( The freshmen will meet in th
Union at *7 o'clock Wednesda
night to organize their groups an
to elect a captain. They will mee
first in the individual groups unde
the direction of the members e
the executive council of the Union
and each group will nominate
man for freshman captain.
Following the group meetings, th
first-year men will meet in th
ballroom where the captain will b
elected from the nominees of th
groups.
Prof. John H. Muyskens of the
speech department has been se
cured to talk to the freshmen. Ii
addition, t h e r e will be shor
speeches by the captains for las
year and by several of the studen
leaders in athletics and other stu-
dent activities.
The sophomores will meet at 7:3(
o'clock on Thursday in 'the ball-
room of the Union. They will als(
elect their captain at this time
Henry Moser, instructor in speech
will talk to the second year men.
The group tournament will alsc
be organized at this time. Smoke:
and refreshments will be provide(
by the Union.
Sale of Senior Photo
Receipts to Continue
The sale of senior photograph re-
ceipts will be continued until Dee,
15, in the offices of the Michigan-
ensian in the Press building on
Maynard street, it was stated yes-
terday by George Hofmeister, '31,
business manager of the yearbook.
Purchase of these receipts covers
the expense of the sitting at any
of the official photographers and
also the cost of the printing in the
'Ensian. The deadline will be strict.
ly adhered to this year, Hofmeister
said, and any seniors who have not
bought these receipts before this
time will not be allowed to have
their pictures in the book.

Light is the first of painters.
-EMERS 1ON
B~L GS
You TTke Pie
O1N THE CAMPUS, where class buildings
and memorial structures are so often
distinguished by their noble form, flood-
lighting equipment serves to prolong the
enjoyment of their beauty and to enhance
pride in the institution. a Such an
application is made for the new 165-foot
campanile at South Dakota State - mag-
nificent gift of an alumnus. Electrically
operated chimes sound the hours and
are heard in concerts. At night, shafts of

i

The telephone grows air-miided

Dratuing of the CoughinuzCampanile at South Dabotra Sta te College,
Brookings, $.SD. Perkii n t a cWayne, arch itects

light from General Electric floodlighting projectors effect a picture of superb beautys
done in the school colors and white. From the air, the tower is identified by the
beam from a G-E airway beacon surmounting the floodlighted dome. a Thas,
G-E equipment plays its part in promoting progress and fine appreciation. Back (f
every G-E product is an organization in which college-trained men are largely

HE BELL SYSTEM has made many
successful experiments in two-way plane
to ground telephone communication. This
newdevelopment.illustrates how it marches
a pace ahead of the new civilization. It is
now growing faster than ever before.
New telephone buildings are going up
this year in 200 cities. MNlany central offices
are changing from manual to dial tele-

phones. A vast program of cable constru-,
tion is going on.
This is the period of growth, improve-
ment and adventure in the telephone
industry. Expenditures this year for new
plant and service improvements will total
more than five hundred and fifty milion
dollars-one and one half times the entire
cost of the Panama Canal,

RL'I T CxTc'rv'i~r

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan