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October 31, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-31

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OE FOUR

THE MTCHT("',AN

nAYITL I

'rMr Tn A

D ,LI4LP1~

fir, OCTODE1,, 31,

F

Published every morning except Monday
luring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to thie use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
thie paper and the local news published
herein.

I

of studying that the more advanced
classes. Perhaps the present m rk-
ing system would have been cotin-TLL
ued there. But for the las twvo
y e a r s a little experimentation WINTER
might have been attempted. in the I
line of marks. Perhaps a snmple COMING
"pass" or "not pass," with a higher
requirement for a passing grade, We would certainly hate to inti-
would cause a little more intensive mate that a member of the faculty
study and real thinking instead of might be a prevaricator, but when
the usual beating-around-the-bush we noticed yesterday that Doc
and repetition of ancient formulae Hussey said "Ice disappeared from
by the students. !Ann Arbor about 30,000 years ago
November 7... " we shook our heady sadly and

_._.. _ __... _. ._.._ _______ ----------._..M...._
t _

I About Books .
LITERARY LEGI'RDEMAIN
R. V. R.: The Life and Times of
Rembrandt van Rijn: Heiidrik
Willem Van Loon: Published by
Horace Liveright: Price $5.

a-.

Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices:.Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
card Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor...............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director......y.....Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor ...............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor............ Mary L. Behymer
Music and Drama .........William J. Gorman
Assistant 'News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor ..........George A. Stauter
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold o. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Parker Terryberry
IrvinJ.Blumberg Robert L. Pierce
Donad o.Boudman Win. F. Pyper
Thomas M. Cooley Sher M. Quraishi
George Fisk Jerry E. Rosenthai
Morton Frank George Rubenstein
Saul Friedberg Charles A. Sanford
Frank B. Gilbretb Karl Seiffert
jack Goldsmith Robert F. Shaw
Roland Goodman Edwin M. Smith
L ames H. Inglis George A. Stauter
enton C. Kunze Alfred R. Tapert
Powers Moulton r ohn S. Townsend
Wilbur J. Myers R~obert D. Townsend

I-

1

This is
book. It goe
ing a patte
cnhi dlicr

A Review.
a g r e a t, rambling
ye oan and on weav-
ern of vague philo-
ssion and other of the
across one of the most
f centuries. it has the
onl one as has that

Outstanding
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___

11

r

STATIONERY
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for all Fraternities and Sororities
See our new samples of all the latest styles
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603 Church Street

Fy

A PROFESSOR SAYS A FEW
THINGS

said tsk, tschk,. and other similar humnities a+
exclamations.umanities
exlaaios interesting of
* * *sam
- sae effect

TPhere re others.of ~ciirsexwhn i

Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Imily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoffmeyer
Jean Levy
Doroth Ma gee
Mary McCall

Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosenthal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising ................Charles T. Kline
Advertisii.7.............. Thomas M. Davis
Advertising ............William W. Warboys
Service....................Norris J. Johnson
Publication ............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation ............ .Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts .................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary ............Mary J. Kenan

Harry R. Begley
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. IDavi_
Richard H. Hile
Erle Kightlinger
Marian Atran
Helen Bailey
orothy Laylin
Sylvia Miller
Helen Olsen

Assistants
r )onald W. Lyons
William Morgan
11. Fred Schaefer
Richardl Stratemneier
s NoelD r. Turner
r Byron C. Vedder
Mildred Postal
Marjorie Rough
ser Ann W. Verner
JMary E. Watts
Joh~anna Wiese

Professor Peter Odegard, of thehat belo abu
share that belief. Notably among
political economy department at them are Ann Arbor house owners.
Ohio State university, has released especially those who live along the
what is perhaps the finest piece of streets leading to the campus, un-
criti4cism of censorship to reach the fortunatelyd
American reading public within the r e
past few years in "The American
Public Mind." The book has been We can distinctly remember
give n unusual recommendation going down to some basketball
throughout the nation's press, and game last winter, and starting
little wonder, for it combi'nes a out at the top of State Street
terse, vivid attack of freedom of hill. In a very short time we
thought with common sense argu- were sitting down at Packard
ments. Not only is it readable but street i a most undignified
it has force and its theme is an position, much o the amuse-
excellent one. ment of several co-eds who
"Censorship prosecutes bad books were most unnecessarily hang-
and they become best sellers; bad ing around. Wait - hanging
plays and they become box office would be too good for them.
hits; immoral movies and people*
flock to the theater," says Professor Which brings us to the subject
Odegard. "Even Canon Chase ad- cf our campaign against co-eds.
mits that i the long run people The latest contribution comes from
don't want immoral pictures, so the want ad columns, so we see
why add to their ,attractiveness by that we have the whole-hearted
censoring them?" co-operation of the business staff.
Freedom of the press is an age-'
old question and one of the most Bachelor Apt. 2 or 3 students
basic clauses in our social, political OR co-eds. Steam Heat.. Fire-
and economic life. Ever since the place. Close to campus or
court ruled, i'n Colonial days, in fa- downtown.
vor of Zanger, world famed now as
the man whose case was the basis That is what our calculus prof.
for American freedom of the press, would call a nicety in differentia-
the 'pros' and 'cons' have been up- tion. But it certainlyadvances an
held with equal vigour. It takes, excellent point in our favor. We
however, a perspicacious viewpoint hope they get students in there.
such as Professor Odegard's to shift * *
the weight of evidence definitely on And this, boys and girls, will be
the affirmative balance. absolutely the last report on the
"Censorship killed Socrates and Library Seal situation. Dan Baxter
crucified Christ. It has lynched was supposed to present it, but he
murdered, robbed. Freedom is the has already started, hitch-hiking
handmaid of democracy as censor- down to Harvard, which means I
ship is the sister of oppression." will have to write the colyum for
But with all these generalizations, the next few days. Anyway, he
Professor Odegard sites examples ought to have taken the bus. At
such as the famous American Mer- least it stops in Canada. However
cury ban i'n Boston, the Sacco- the campaign was a complete suc-
Vanzetti execution, the Patterson, cess. Before it started, everybod
N.J., strike trials, and many other walked on the Seal. Last night we
famous cases of liberty vs. the law. counted them, and of the 368 peo-
He is clear in his arguments against ple that passed (Hey-none of
the "silly hand of censorship" which that stuff . . . Editor) 178 carefull3
really doesn't know what is or what walked around the seal. We have
is not food for the public, for the at least educated half the campus
public is, after all, decent at heart, which is as good if not better thar
and doesn't need a yes and no the faculty is doing.
committee to tell it what it should * * *
read and see and listen to. Dear Elmer:
Professor Odegard has struck a This, on the front page yes-
ringing note in his book on free- terday: "Dean Bursley stated
dom of the press, of speech and of that the purpose of the cards
thought. He hasn't been any too is to enable the student to
careful with his choice of words identify himself . ..
concerning censors but who cares? After all, who am I? Yes you
After reading him, one feels per- heard me. Who am I? (1) I was
fectly justified in abhoring the Freddie Bobbsey last Thursday,
term and its principles. He is per- but what does that prove? The
fectly right in his assertion that by picture on this card looks like
saying, "No, no, you mustn't" to me, and then again it looks
everything, we only excite the caui- like Eddie Tolan, Dan Baxter,
osity and develop the desire to see, with a bit of Eugene O'Neill
read and ditest those things which thrown in. Perhaps Hume was
we, as grown-ups, are not admitted right. Perhaps the self is, after
to because we wouldn't understand all, merely a flux of percep-
them and our morals might be tions. That's it. Merely a flux
ruined. of perceptions.
Freedom of the press, of thought Who am I? What of it? (2)
and of speech are principles which Vaguely,
every sane American advocates and Freddie Bobbsey.
now, with such an addition to the * * *
cause as this academic view, the Well Freddie, we see that yo
case is stronger than ever. A pro- have been studying that Phil. 3
fessor has really said something. course, even if we haven't. But the

,i

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1930
Night Editor:CARL S. FORSYTHE
GRADES AND KNOWLEDGE
An editorial in the Barnard Col-
lege paper recently advocated the
abolition of the marking system
user there, namely the A, B, C, D,j
and E grades, in favor of some bet-
ter method of determining a stu-
dent's progress in education.
Back in the early 1900's Michigan
had only three marks: not passing,
passing, and very satisfactory. With
the institution of a Phi Beta Kappa
chapter, the system was changed,
and the present method of grades
w a s instituted. Many excellent
points, however, may be presented
in favor of the old system.
At present, the student forces
hismself to memorize too much. His
incentive is not to learn anything
for the future, but to work for a
grade. The more important goal,
that of cultivating a more intelli-
gent process of thought, as well as
adding to his general store of
knowledge, is forgotten in the effort
tq cram down a few facts that will
enable the student to get an A or
a B on a certain test. Knowledge
its forced into the student in short
doses, and after certain timse, it
leaves him; he derives no benefit
from the courses.
The system as worked out in Eng-
land and Germany is far more suc-
cessful. Everything usually depends
on the final examination, and the
work of an entire year cannot be
crammed into the brain in a few
days of intensive studying before
the examination. The information
has to absorbed slowly, and when
it is done in this. manner, it is usu-
ally permanent.
Michigan has advanced in this
partitcular 'field through the honor
courses that are offered in various
departments. Lectures are given,
and recitation sections are really
used for intelligent discussion; in-
dependent and logical thinking is
encouraged, instead of the repeti-
tion of opinions of others; argu-
mentation is encouraged. This type
of education is of far more value
to the student than the intensive
drilling of facts that is usually of-
fered.
We do not mean, above all, to
identify ourselves with an attempt

Indian drug Hasheesh with which
the narrator of this history does
so much experimenting. I am sure
that someone or other will say that
the indiscriminate use of emotions
and moods which make this book.
is a literary illegitimacy. For there
is a reason why our urbane Ameri-
can literary brethren should label
Van Loon's work illegitimate art.
There sits the author and from his
quiet Dutch eminence in Zeeland
gazes placidly at the universe and
sends forth thick tomes one after
another which become best sellers
as soon as they are sent forth.
Van Loon's work is peculiar. It
rolls on and on like small ripples
breaking on a sheltered shore,
never changing the easy tenure of
its ways, never developing into nor
responding to storms and disturb-
ances. When something is happen-
ing, we tell it by what the water
washes up, blood or fire or, as is
very often the case, that good
dutch beer which by the end of
the book must have reposed gallons
deep in the belly of our chronicler.
This may not be very clear but
neither is the style. It is Van Loon's
way of giving his books power, and I
it is his way of making them po-
pular, for it is certain that it does
not make them great. He takes a
sort of outer world attitude toward
man and living, and this is re-
flected in his work. I said before
that the book weaves a pattern. It
does and in doing so presents an
impression of timelessness which
is false.
Rembrandt is never realized fully.
The doctor's chaneo meeting with
the great artist might have been
one of the high spots of the book.
It is not, and a great opportunity
is lost. It is true that the character
is built up faithfully and in great
detail. But, the book fnished, all we
know of him is his lack of prac-
ticality and his consumate passion
for work. There is also, at times,
some of the bitter disappointment
and the hopelessness of battle
which seems to have bsen the poi-
tion of most artists. Perhaps this
is Van Loon's purpose. It seems
that he is writing purely for popu-
lar consumption. He has figured
out that Rembrandt's absolute
financial incapability is the surest
method of introducing him to a
practical public. So he harps on
and on about money, never giving
us that insight into the rich life
of Rembrandt that we most desire.
And this was a great mistake.
There could have been nothing
more fascinating than an attempt
to portray for us the passions and
sestasys that burned in the man
as he sat till four in the morning
painstakingly working at an etch-
ing or a dry point, his stern face
playing tricks in the shadows that
his single candle threw; or the
cealization he had of the ruffians
that he saw one day in his youth
as he leaned, sketching, against a
tree during a flerce street battle.
The strong current of hopes and
dreams which runs like a second
life in a man and only touches the
surface on occasion is entirely lack-
ing.
However if we don't get Rem-
brandt, we do get the age. It is
built up by a thousand little details
which the length of the book makes
possible, until through very fami-
liarity we start to believe that
there is no difference between now
and then. Very cleverly for a best
seller, the book is written by a
liberal and a very liberal, liberal n
an age of strictest orthodoxy. So
that through this liberalism we get

to believe that there is no differ-
ence between the ages. However the
vast majority were not as was the
author of the diary and the friend
of Rembrandt. So it is a question,
whether even the age is faithfully
portrayed. It is written as if viewed
from the twentieth century. This
is just one of the little tricks Van
Loon uses to attain realism and
belief. There are many more.
Perhaps Rembrandt's reputation
as an artist is so firm that a cri-
tical biography would have been
useless and a presumption. But
even so a biography written from
the present would have been able
to give a truer account than one
written from the past, even though

I

H

---

III

--

'I

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waiting for the arrival of
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most reasonably priced.
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. . . . . . . . .

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Tint White Satin Slippers Any Color
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I

-L A
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III

ITHE- E F. MILLS COMPANY

it

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Prepare NOW . . for that first
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$195
7
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11

UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynard & William
Phone 7515

IL

118 Main Street

III

1 ,A

BOBO

-LINK

0

MINATURE GOLF
"The best course I have ever
seen."--Every Patron.

C

You will .say the same when you see the 40 foot Fairways,
beautiful Chinese decorations, tricky hazards and perfect
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18 HOLES OF GOLF THRILLS ... 25c
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
AT ALL TIMES
BRIDGE CARDS AND TABLES
PROVIDED

i ='Il

I

DIPLOMACY HUMANIZED.
One of the first international
steps to check the illicit circulation
of narcotics was taken recently by
Great Britain when a conference of
ten drug manufacturhg nations
was called at the instigation of For-
eign Secretary Henderson. This
meeting will serve as a preliminary
of the general convention at Geneva
next May.
Its two-fold purpose as, explained
by Mr. Henderson will be to arrange
an agreement as to the proportions
of narcotics to be manufactured by
the different nations, and, secondly,
to arrange for the distribution of
these drugs between the consuming
countries.
At the present time the Univer-
sity of Michigan is co-operating
w i t h scintists throughout the
country in an attempt to find a
narcotic which will not be habit-
forming. If such a substance is not
found, and it has not been as yet,
then other measures to limit the
distribution of drugs must be taken.
International co-operation is the
only answer.
This conference at London marks
the first definite step along these

main points are (1) and (2) Who
cares? Thanx for the letter, any-
way, old man.
* * *
They ought to have printed a
side view, a number, and $10,000
reward offered" under Dan Bax-
ter's the way it looked.
* * *
The campaign funds for the
Newberry Aud. rejuvenation cam-
paign aren't coming in so well.
From the revenue headquarters in
Detroit we got a quart of water for
washing the seats. The business
staff crashed through with % inch
of advertising, provided we don't
use it all in one issue. Kind of
them. Come on. Who'll help the
little lady? Give her a big hand,
folks, a great big hand.
* * *
When we asked for some new
campaign ideas several daze ago,
someone (probably a co-ed, I'll bet
a pretty penny) sent in a sugges-
tion for a club-for-the-suppression-
o f-rye-bread-and-rolls-more-espe-
cially-rolls. But it just proves they
are very inferior intellectually and
have at last taken notice of our
he-man's organization. In class to-
day (we were incognito) we heard
-- - - - - - - -- c cnTif ~

FOUNTAIN SERVICE
Visitors Welcome

We are

having our

customary
O NTH-END SALE

®ItIIIIIIIIII111 1611181 1111 61[igi ll 11/ 1119111111l111II81181 818t111i[
SPECIALS AT
Swift's Drug Store
340 South State Street
Dr. West's Tooth Paste $1.75 Pinauds Hair Tonic
19c 50c Pinauds Shampoo
3 Tubes for 59c Both for $1.49
$2.25 Blue Boar Tobacco 60c Muisified Cocoanut Oil
2 $7.00 Rumidor 25c Shampoo Cape
$9.25 value for $5.00 85c vahum for 3e

This month
very smart,
valued from

we offer a line of
sophisticated hats,
$6.50 to $10.00 at

$3.95
Also to acquaint new students
with our cut on the head depart.
ment, we are offering French felts
made to order for $5.00.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
ONLY

I

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1111

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