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October 30, 1930 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'T'HTMSDAY, 4CTODER 30

) ? h

S 4 !VI t"f t I t O A T L Y

PAGE SMEN

J, l$3DA, CTBE 1t Ir- e. Ivil \. l Yt'] 1 fL [a a L
t~ h U.JU.A l .. . . .......... .. . __..~

CAMPUS NT MET"
IN OUARTERI ALS
Lack of Outstanding Players Is
Drawlack to Annual Tennis
Tournament.
PHELPS MAY TAKE MEET
Marked by a lack of the out-
standing players of the campus
and games won by lopsided scores,
the All-Campus tennis tourney
now in progress is just reaching the
quarter-finals. Hart is the first one
to advance that tar. He will play
the winner between Ctirtis, who
defeated Cole, and Appelt, who won
over Kaplen, 6-4, 7-5 in one of the
few close matches.
Others who have advanced to
the fourth round are Williams, who
will play the winner of the Young,
Scnap match; Root and Land; Wil-
cox and Bob Muzzy, who is one of
the few left in the freshman tour-
ney; Dlugolensk who meets the
winner between Phellps and Horsey;
and Selzer and MacNeal.
Williams, Phelps,.May See Finals.
According to past records, it ap-
pears that Williams should meet
'Phelps in the finals. Phelps was
runner-up in this tournament last
year and Williams is going strong
against each opponent that he
draws. The semi-finals and finals
might be better fights and more
interesting if some of the leading
tennis players of the campus had
entered.
The large field that started has
been weeded out rapidly with scores
that indicate that the contestants
are not consistent in their games.
With few exceptions the victories
run in the 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 class, a
winner by such a score going down
to the next man by a like tally.
this makes the matches look hard
when lined up, but they often prove
disappointments.
The Intramural Department asks
that the players still in the tourna-
ment arrange to play their oppon-
ents as soon as possible and to re-
port the results of the match as
soon as it is played. This will facili-
tate the keeping of the records and
keep the tournament rolling to the
end.
SECTIONAL TEAMS
HEADEDBY EAST
Mid-West Teams Lose Prestige
by Bowing to South.
(ByAssociated Press)
NEW YORK, Oct. 29.--A check-
up today on the returns from in-
tersectional football games played
so far this season revealed the east,
south and far west with a winning
average of .500 or better.
The east has won 17 and lost 11;
the far west's record is two vic-
tories and . Tine defeat; and the
south has 10 wins and 10 losses to
show for its intersectional warfare
to date.
Largely because they have been
unable to hold their own with
southern adversaries, the middle
western standard bearers have 19
def eats as compared with 15 vie-
tories. The mid-west has done well
in its conflicts with the east, hav-
ing broken even numerically and
won the more important games, but
has only two victories and eight
defeats in its warfare with the
south.
All Small Schools.
The south, on the other hand,
has won only two out of 10 from
the east, several of the smaller
teams of the south having been
sent out of their class in such

cases as Furman vs. Army and
Hampden-Sidney vs. Cornell.
The southwest, although repre-
sented by powerful teams, has only
one major victory and three de-
feats to show for its outside activ-
ity principally because the south-
westerners chose to tackle such.
teams as Notre Dame and Purdue.
Southern Methodist retaliated last
Saturday by stopping Indiana in-
conclusive fashion.

Xthtramn raI
VOUl BALL FRATERNITY SWIL NG
Fraternity volleyball gets under Fraternity swimming Ecd water
way next Monday, four games polo entries are du in the office
being scheduled for that date. of the Intramural department by
Many of the teams are making pre- November 7. Phi Kappa Psi and
paration for the coming competi- Theta Chi are the two defending
tion by practicing this week. champions with the fomler having
Three teams are arranged in a won first honors in swimming for
league and each team meets each the last three years, and the latter
of their league rivals twice for a being acknowledged polo chain-
total of four games. League Winners pions in the past tv'o years.hm
play in a championship series, and There are in all five events inc
all losers meet in a consolation addition to the water polo games.
tournament. Each contestant is permitted to

I

Trigon, last year's volleyballE
champions, are defending their
laurels with another strong team.
It is believed however, that 'they ,
will have a difficult time repeating'
because of the increased interest
which the fraternities 'are showing
this year with forty-five teams
making up the entry list.
Monday's schedule follows: 7:30
-Tau Delta Phi vs. Phi Sigma
Kappa, Triangle vs. Delta Upsilon;
8:30-Tau Kappa Epsilon vs. Phi;
Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Psi vs.!
Pi Kappa Alpha. Teams can reserve
the courts for practice by phon-
ing 22101.
HANDBALLa
Entry blanks for handball, one
of the most active sports offered'
on the Intramural sports program,
have just been placed in the mails.
Entries will positively not be ac-
cepted after November 5. Fraterni-
ties areturged to make it a point
to 'see that their organization is
represented in this tournament.
In handball competition the <
teams are composed of four men
each with two of the players up-
holding the singles and the other
two playing in the doubles. No one
entrant can play in both the
singles and doubles. A team must
win two of the three matches to
emerge victqrious in the match.
The tournament is run on a straight.
elimination basis.
Wolves Resume Drill
After Short Lay-off
(Continued From Page 6)
with an eye to developing a quar-
tet that can run the ball through
the line for a few yards when need-
ed to make a first down. Hudson
at fullback, Newman, at the signal
calling post, and Wheeler and
Eastman at the halfback positions
,started and succeeded in running
through the Freshman second team
with ease at time and then again
being stopped behind the line when
a diminutive yearling proved too
elusive for the regulars and broke
through to smear the play.
Jack Wheeler was the mainstay
of this combination. The veteran
Wolverine who has done so well in
the past few games, showed plenty
of flash in picking his holes and
eluding the yearling taklers to
make runs that*Would have result-
ed in touchdowns had the teams
been playing a regular scrimmage.
DeBaker Goes Well.
DeBaker, another light fast back,
who has had little chance to show
his wares in Conference Competi-
tion also performed well after he
had replaced Wheeler at halfback.
Tessmer went in for Newman and
looked better than he has at any
time this season on offensive play.
The Wolverines seem to have
made a new find in a heavy driv-
ing backfield man in the person-
age of Avery who has, up to the
present been recognized as a line-
man. This substitute was given
several opportunities to carry the
ball after he had taken Hudson's
place and showed marked ability
in hitting the line at full force
with plenty of drive left to carry
him through in spite of opposing
Freshman tacklers.
Without a doubt the Wolverines
will be in the pink of condition
when the time comes to leave for
the east and the battle with the
Crimson a week from Saturday.

enter two events, but only on the

condition that one of these be the
diving or relay event, and noateam
is allowed to enter more than one
swimmer in any individual event.
Junior V rity Drls
for 0;7ehrsie Punch
(Continued from Page 6) (
at Kalamazoo, on Nov. 15.
In view of the fact that the Mich-
igan offense needs considerableI
bolstering before her game, the
work for the coming week and a1
half will undoubtedly be along that
line. It is probable that Coaches
Courtright and Keen, resting fairly
content with the defensive ,vork,
will only treat that slightly during
the next few days, and devote the
majority of their time to the other
department of play.
Most pleasing from a Michigan
viewpoint in last Saturday's game
was the work of the Michigan line,
and if the backfield can start
functioning as well a really formid-
able Wolverine team' can tame the
field against the Detroit outfit.
Fourth Place Teams
Given Series Splits
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Oct. 29.-The Cleve-
land Indians and Brooklyn Robins,
fourth place clubs in the American
and National leagues respectively,
received $16,193.77 each from the
players' share of the 1930 world's
series.
CHICAGO-Hank Bruder, North-
western captain, was recently re-
leased from the hospital where he
has been recovering from acase of
smallpox. He has been working
out regularly, and is ready for ac-
tion at any time.
NEW YORK--The crowd of 75,-
000 that Witnessed the Illinois-
Michigan game last Saturday was
the third largest football crowd in
,the country that day.

~uH
FOfl ILLI I TILT
oiemakers Dr on Rtrnni
Attack in Preparing for
Sat urday's Game.
PASSES ARE EFFECTIVE
(8P>caa! h o )o. h)u
LAFAYETTE, Ind., Oct. 29.-Pre-,
paring for its fourth Big Ten en-
counter in as many Sai-rdays, Pur-
due's football squad, battling toward
the top in the conference standing,
hopes to improve the efficiency of
its running attack before tackling
the greatly improved Illinois eleven
at Champaign on Saturday.
Although the Beilermakers threw
passes through, over and around
the Badgers last Saturday in hand-
ing the Wisconsin crew its first
defeat of the season, 7 to 6, the
running attack failed to function
as expected, and Kizer hopes to
give added punch to the of ensive
attack during the coming week by
improving the blocking of both
backs and linemen.
Score on Pass Play.
The Boil rmakers displayed a
finished brand of ball against the
favored Badgers, coring on a de-
ceptive forward p ss play from Risk
to Kissell that caught the visitors
fiat-footed and alowed the midget
Purdue back to race unmolested 15
yards for the victory touchdown
after taking a beautiful 33-yard
pass on the dead run. Following the
touchdown. Purdue set.tled down to
a safety brand of ball that kept
Wisconsin at bay with the excep-
tion of its last quarter drive.
Perhaps the most encouraging
part of the game from the Purdue
standpoint was the improvement of
the tackling. Howard Kissell, play-
ing halfback, and moving to end
when Moss punted, turned in a
beautiful defensive game, as well
as on the offensive, while George
Van Bibberf, proved his right to
"all-team" consideration with a
finished performance in all depart-
ments.
Other standouts in Purdue's vic-
tory included Lewis Pope, halfback;
Ed Risk, halfback; Roy Horstman,
fullback; Lewis Miller, center; Jack
White, quarterback, and Paul Moss,
end.
RED GRAPE JUICE
23% Pure Grape Sugar
RUDY WAGNER
North Main or 1529 Broadway

OF THE UNIVERSIT
STUDENTS-FACULTY-OTHERS
0tatrR

Four doors south of Liberty

0O2 South Main

i
..

71 'r r

'

Give us a chance to show you how
clean clothes can be.washed.
MOE LAUNDRY,
Delivery
Phone 3916 204 North Main
a 3C
GEOLOGY EXAM TUTORING
Personally by Mr. Tommie Mack
310 So. State St. Phone 7927
151 TUTORS-ALL COURSES
MACK TUTORING AGENCY
310 S. State St. Phone 7927
123C
LUNCH AND DINNER to few stu-
dents who would appreciate
home cooking. 827 McKinley
Ave. Phone 8873. 123

C LASSIFIE
ADVERiSiNG

NOTION

DOWN TOWN
H AVE A MESS AGE FOR YOU-
YES, IT CAN BE DONE!
You may think it necessary to pay high pr c for shces in,
Ann Arbor. If this is your opinion, come down town and
let us show you these good lines of shoes at medium prices.
You will change your mind.
WHY NOT WALK DOWN TOWN
AND SAVE YOURSELF A DOLLAR OR TWO?

WANTED

"r'/1////I//' 4 . j " rlr
4 .,,f,
Black or White Moire Pumps in the latest
Fall lasts. Whites may be any color to
match your gown . .
$6.50
Black Kid or Patent Pum s as above.
x$6.00

'7 ;

i

Know the pleasure of
wearing t h e s e new
Queen Quality shoes.

I

I

ning wear.

For afternoon and eve-
They are unmistakably correct, and like all Queen

Quality models they are medium priced..

BY YOUNG WOMAN position as
private secretary on campus. Ex-
cellent preparation and refer-
ences, thorough experience. Ad-
dress box 142. 234
Want mechanical engineering stu-
dent for part time engineering
work in Ann Arbor territory.
H. O. TRERICE CO.
1420 W. Lafayette Blvd.
Detroit, Mich.
WANTED-Students ,bundle wash-
ing. All socks darned free. Will
call for and deliver. Call 2-3365.
3456123
FOR RENT
FOREST NEAR HILL--Two room
suite. Private bath, sleeping
porch. Will accommodate four
boys. 3671. 234
BACHELOR APT.-2 or 3 students
or co-eds. Steam heat. Fireplace.
Close to campus or down town.
403 S. Division. Week days. 3
FURNISHED HOME - Seven rooms
-,-steam heat -radio - garage.
$50.00. Phone 4359. 123
FOR RENT-7 room house; twelve
minute walk from campus on
Bus line and one-half block from
Eberbach School and one and
one-half block from Tappan
Junior High. Two-car garage;
rent reasonable. Ready for oc-
cupancy. Phone owner 23440.
2204 Packard Rd.
NEW 6-room unfurnished apart-
ment just outside of town. Sun
parlor, enclosed sun porch, ga-
rage, soft water, electrical refrg-
eration, electric stove, laundry
tubs. $50. Call 6509 during the
day.'2X
FOR SALE
RACOON COAT, MAN'S-All dark
skins. Bargain. Call Detroit,
Cadillac 5164, M. Gordon. 23
GRAPES-Grape juice, California
grape juice and sweet cider. Call
9534. 6-12345
LOST
LOST-A maroon Waterman foun-
tain pen with name Evelyn
Decker. Finder please call 2-3225.
3
LOST-Black and red round com-
pact with diamond setting on
cover. Return to Mich. Daily.
Box 147. Rward. 234
LADIES' black purse in balcony of
Michigan theatre. Contains R.
R. ticket, fountain pen, etc. Re-
ward. J. G. McLeese, 715 Hill.
Phone 8517. 23
LOST-Psychology 31 notes marked
M. M. on small sized note book
paper. Phone 8664. 234

FOR CRISP OUT-DOOR

T; ,:
r
. ,-
,_.
a

Smart two and three eyelet ties in dark or medium browns
or blacks. Just the thing for street or campus wear. Most
styles priced at $6.00 or $6.50.*

r

silmi

1. 7T a ss"

.Jfrnericaus Best
I&Z'owr, shoes

OF INTEREST TO YOU!
The W. L. Douglas Shoe Co. build shoes for us, especially
designed for the college man. They are made according to
our own specifications plus the famous W. L. Douglas quality

and shoe-making
Of cours
can't buy
shoes for
$go
to
0$ f

$"
e you
better
-
ev. s
F

,___ i
E Ali

SCOTCH GRAINS
CALFSKINS

BROWNS
BLACKS

. ...--

CANDIES

LIGHT LUNCHES

r

, l
%
1
,,#
,,

Just ecived a ship-
ment of
Johnston s
Chocolates
wrapped special for
Hallowe'en.

And this fall slogan of ours goes
for topcoats, suits-in fact every-
thing we sell.

DRESS OXFORDS
WL.DOUGLAS
FORMAL
Dull Black Calfskin or Patent leather.
New styles, lasts with more comfort than
eve-
lill I II111111

READ
THESE

CLASSIFIEDS
EACH DAY
THEY WILL
PAY YOU

overcoats $3u

and
more

$1.75

BOND STREET SPATS
Gray or Fawn

$2,25

11

11

11

m

Pill 4flTb Q~~ 1 U U II m

0

I

nI

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