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October 30, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER. 30, 1930

THE MTC141 AN

DAILY

THRSAY9OTBE®3.D93.HEMf -IAN DAILYm =
W'N I

Four

C olle vs

Are

Invited

to

Take

Part in

Hockey

Play

Day

HOLD REGIST09ATID
STURDAY BEFORE
EVENTS COMMENCE
sJ
Elisabeth Whitney, '31 Ed, Gets s
General Chairmanship ti
ofAffair. b
w
PROGRAM IS PLANNED w
Teams Will be Entertained at
Luncheon and Tea Dance
Following Games.
The second annual Hockey Play
Day, sponsored by the Physical
Education department for women,
will begin with registration at 9:30
Saturday morning, Nov. 8, accord-
ing to an announcement made by
Miss Ruth Hassinger, instructor in
Physical Education.
Guest teams are expected from
Michigan State college at Lansing,
the Battle Creek School of Physi-
cal Education a Battle Creek, the
Detroit Teachers' College at Detroit,
and the Michigan State Normal at
Ypsilanti. Each school will enter
two teams, and a total of about 30
players will compete from each
school.
The Play Day will be different
from that held last year in that
hockey will be the only game play-
ed. After registration, the teams
will draw for opponents, and begin
playing at 10 o'clock. At noon,
luncheon will be served to the play-
ers at the Women's Athletic build-
ing. There will be entertainment
during luncheon, and about 25 ex-
tra places will be available for any
others who would like to attend.
After a rest period, the games
will be resumed at 2:30, and played i
until over. The guests will then be i
entertained at a tea-dance in the
Athletic building, when skits from1
last year's Junior Girls' Play willt
be given. This concludes the pro- (
gram, and the teams will leave Sat-
urday night. -
Elizabeth Whitney, '31 Ed., is
general chairman for Play Day,v
and Miss Laurie Campbell, head of
the Physical Education m a j o r
school, is faculty advisor. The re-
ception committee is headed by
Frances Beuthien, '31, who is be-
ing assisted by Miss Marie Zettler,
instructor in the Physical Educa-
tion school.
Dorothy Sample, '32, vice-presi-
dent of the Women's Athletic As-
sociation, is in charge of the social
committee, and Miss Editha Bar-
thel of the Physical Education de-
partment, is ,advisor. Jean Bots-
ford, '33, is chairman of the games
committee, and will be assisted by
Dr. 1Vabel Rugen, assistant profes-
sor in Physical Education. The pro-
gram committee is under Helen
Domine, '31, president of W. A. A.,
and Mrs. Dorothy Hall, advisor of
W. A. A., is assisting her. Publicity
is in charge of Emily Grimes, '31,
with Miss Ruth Hassinger acting as
faculty advisor. The committee
chairmen will announce the per-
sorniel"of their committees later.
Dr. Trow Gives Speech
About Soviet Russia's
Educational Programs
"Russia's Educational Campaigns"
was the subject of a lecture given
before Pi Lambda Theta, national
honorary educational sorority by
Dr. William Clark Trow, Tuesday
evening in the Women's Field
House.
Dr. Trow emphasized the com-

prehensiveness of the education
program in Soviet Russia. He stat-
ed ghat the endeavors of the Rus-
sian educators could not be appre-
ciated without a realization of the
enormity of the task that lies be-
fore them. The communist doc-
trine is strongly infused into every
angle of the campaign to reduce
illiteracy, and this doctrine is a-
dapted to all the various age levels.
After the talk, motion pictures of
street scenes and educational in-
stitutions taken in and near Len-
ingrad were shown.
~IPERMANENTS
$4 $6 $8
(with service)
Shampoo and Finger
it Wave (short hair).. $1.25
Marcel ................75c

WEEKLY RYTHMIC
T 'I'' {P ST CAT E CLASSES PLANNEDI
, ! Lessons to be for Instruction
of Small Children.
Paris openings in August are deI At the request of Dr. Bell, profes-
igned primarily to change and sor of physical education, and ad-
Luggest the mode, and cater large- visor in physical education to wom-
y to the Ameican dress manufac- en, rhythm classes for little chil-
=rers. The openings which have dren have been organized to meet
een held in Paris during the past every Saturday morning at Barbour
week and this are not 3o conoerned Gin s
ith innovations, but are interested G ymnasium, beginning this Satur-
day, Nov. 1.
There will be a class at 10 o'clock
for children between the ages of
five to eight years and at 11 o'clock
(for children from eight to twelve
years old. These classes will be giv-
en in a series of ten lessons and
every one interested is eligible to
join.
"The children of faculty members
and town people will be given an
excellent opportunity to hear and
respond to musical rhythm and to
exercise their ow; initiative and
creative potentialities," said Miss
Emily White, instructor in physical
education, who is conducting the
classes. "We are planning to start
s r. work immediately, Saturday morn-
ing and want the children prepared
to take part in the exercises at
once. These classes are a continua-
tion of a practice started some
years ago and have been most suc-
cessful in the past," she stated.
and belted with a flaring skirt, fur
trimmed, often with a fur border.
Tuck in blouses are again shown
by Vionnet, having survived the ef-
O forts of the courtiers in August to
surplant them by blouses worn
outside the skirt.
Chanal confirms the August sil-
houette with a natural waistline
and calf length skirt, and the
double flounce treatment so pop-
rather in confirming that which ular for day time wear. Evening
s already accepted and in adding skirts are very ample, the fullness
new details. starting below a smooth hipline.
The Vionnet collection shown on 1 However there is less massing of
he 23rd of this month, avoided the the material at the back than was
use of black stressing for daytime shown in the August collection.
wear blue, beige and brown, and New evening colors include a med-
a dull raspberry shade. A great ium blue and a pink shade between
many dark blue coats were shown old rose and salmon. Materials
with either blue or white dresses. most favored are chiffon, tulle and
These ensembles are usually fitted lace.

OH 0 ( ['(g AMERICAN JAZZ NOT UNPLEASANT
JO DAN DEEATA SAYS CHINESE GRADUATE STUDENT
an mia as nnn'i n n

riH I UAUUK, -

-1

tneta Yh heats Sigma mappa
in Game Marked by
Good Teamwork.

KAPPA ALSO WINS GAME
Jordan Hall won its second game
of the season yesterday by defeat-
ing Martha Cook 2-0. It was a slow
game, and much fouling was evi-
dent. Neither of the teams dis-
played the form that they have
shown in previous games.
Elizabeth Whitney, '31, Gladys
Stimpson, '32, and Adele Mysen, '31,
were the stars of the Martha Cook
team, as were Nell Hagedorn, Grad.,
Esther La Rowe, '32, and H e 1 e n
Hammond, '32, for Jordan Hall.
Pi Beta Phi won its game from
Sigma Kappa by a margin of 4-0.,
This game was fast, and Sigma
Kappa put up enough opposition to
make it a, fighting game to the end.
Pi Phi displayed good teamwork
and excellent passing.
Helen Moore, '31, and Margaret
Stahl, '31, did some nice playing for
Sigma Kappa. Dorothy Birdzell, '32,
and Sylvia Lee, '33, showed good
form for Pi Beta Phi.
Alpha Omicron Pi lost to Kappa
Kappa Gamma 6-0. This was Alpha
Omicron Pi's first game, and they
were handicapped because they did
not have a full team nor experi-
enced players. Outstanding team-
work marked this game. Kappa
Kappa Gamma exhibited good play-
ing and clean, long passes.
The best playing was done by Al-
bertina Maslen, '31, Ruth Van Tuyl.
'31, and Katherine Clifford, '31,1 of
Alpha Omicron Pi. Annette Cum-
mings, '33, Grace Mayer, '34, and
Frances Whipple, '31, starred for
Kappa Kappa Gamma.
TYPEWRITING AND
MIMEOGRAPHING
A specialty for twenty
years. Prompt service.
Experienced operators.
Moderate rates.
o. D. MORRILL
314 South State Phone 6615

Lyrics of Popular Pieces
Are More Disappointing
Than Music.
"When I first listened to Ameri-
can Jazz through the closed win-
dows of the Michigan Union, I
thought that it was nothing but a'
rhythmic boom-boom-boom; but
now that I have become more ac-
customed to it, it is not so unpleas-
ant," said one of the Chinese wo-
man students.
"In China," she continued, we
have nothing like the American
Jazz although we do have popular
music which contains some of its
characteristics. These songs and
ballads have the spirit of the com-
monplace subject which has gath-
ered around it a certain signifi-
cance. This music also has the
combination of humor, action and
pathos that the American Jazz
contains. But no Chinese music
has the rhythm of Jazz. Jazz is
emphatically r h y thmi c even
though it might have nothing else.
The words of Jazz," she said with
a smile, "are often unnecessarily

disappointing. The music has more
meaning.
"To you Americans, Chinese
l i i n ht r vs nnntnnrc ac

it lacks what you call 'pep.' Chinese
music is plaintive," she continued.
"This is perhaps because the Chin-
ese have a naturally melancholy
turn of mind; and also because of
the many years of experience be-
hind the race in which the sorrow-
ful instances seem to cling more to
their memory than the happy."
The student went on to explain
that the younger Chinese men and
women are becoming quite inter-
ested in American Jazz for danc-
ing purposes, and that in the quar-
ters where there are many foreign-j
ers, it is very popular.

:!

LITERARY SOCIETY
CHOOSESPLEDGES
Athena Meeting Is Followed by
Musical Entertainment.
Epsilon chapter of Athena, na-
tional literary and debating society,
was entertained Tuesday evening
in the Alumnae room of the League
by Marjorie Kirk, '32, with two
piano solos, and by Ruth Morrison,
'32, with the reading, Madame
Butterfly, following a business
meeting.
The pledges who have been taken
in by the society are Dorothy Peck,
'32, Dorothy Daniels, '32, Louise
Crandall, '34, Martha Littleton, '34,
Emma Lou Swanson, '33, Barbara
I Shuker, '32, Jane Bean, '32, Ger-
trude B. Cook, '31, and Agnes John-
son.
--1

1 X11

HATS

THAT ARE DIFFERENT

Felt and soleil fitted to the head

McKINSEY
227 South

HAT SHOP
State Street

l1

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STEPPING INTO A M'4ODERN W 9-13

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The First Big Sale of the Seaso

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MILLINERY
PRICE
At this convenient time we
are offering you the season's
best millinery at an unpre-
cidented price. Styles and
colors are Fall'skbest. . .
come in and take advantage
of this unusual offer.
$25.00 Values $12.50
15.00 " 7.50
12.50 6.25
10.00 " 5.00
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY ONLY.
,rte ,

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wrwr
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.gam..
.S

Scientist and

Salesman.

THE MODERN PARTNERSHIP

Like every other modern industry, the Bell
System requires the combined effort of scien-
tist and salesman. The commercial man has
again and again shown the public how to use
new products of the telephone laboratory,
and how to make new uses of existing
apparatus.
Transmitting pictures and typewritten mes-

sages over telephone wires are services right
now being actively promoted. Scientific selling
by long distance is among many ideas origi-
nated to increase the telephone's usefulness.
In short telephony is a business, with prob-
lems that stimulate commercially minded men
and a breadth of opportunity in step with the
fast moving world of industry today.

7.....

11

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