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October 30, 1930 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-30

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PAGE TWO
UNIERSITY P!AS
x2R :PI mT F .4TJ I
Af Group Includes 579'
Mahigan Secondary
Institutions.
IMITTEE NUMBERS 17
;.:n System Inaugurated
$n 1870 at Suggestion
of Prof. Frieze.

T t417 A)l T (4 " T (*4- A V N A Y I V

If -VTT%-tO4VA*W - .-

,,, a n v i %-1 1 HIN 1 H 1 L iTHURSD.AY OCTOBER 30 130

Xmerican Minister to Colombia Plans Exploration
Trip in Atta pt to Find Arctic Relics at Equator

TOLSTOY LECTJRE
PLAN.S ANONE

By C. E. HARNER
(By Associated Press)
BOGOTA, Colombia. -With Am-
b, ,ssa(dor Dawes studying the traces
of prehistoric map in Spanish cave,
other American diplomat has
been planning to carry the world's
',wledge back a few additiornl
illions of years into the Pliocene
age.
The latter diplomat is Jefferson
Caffery, United States minister to
the Republic of Colombia. He wi'l
{.tempt, in January, to reach the
,ak of snow-capped Navado del
olima, 18,400 feet high where l a-
nspetio th hih shoos ~s moe amil abve he imgLa-

McLaugh in to
Saturday;

Inaugurate Series
to Talk on

In spection of the high schools ;' vs move a mile above the timber-
ofs t ene and only 200 miles from the
t orgh0e the state to insure con- iuator.
tf' = o accredited rating with There he hopes to discover evi-
t i 'sity is well under way 3nces of an Arctic region com-
wah tl apointment of 16 faculty rable to the tropical traces which
men to serve under George E. Car-k )ive been found by scientists in the
. Actic and Antarctic. Science be-
rL lies, chairman of the University ves it possible that the poles of
c;nmittee in that division. 1he earth were once on the equator,
Those named for 1930 are Carl J. since tropical relics have been found
Coe, Harry'H. Coe, Albert R. Crit- l'11 the present polar areas.
Mount Tolima is unexplored,
tenden, Francis D. Curtis, Calvin O Many expeditions have failed to
Dow, Ora S. Duffenback, James E. climb the ancient volcanicvcone and
Dunlop, Clyde Wilson, Solomon nE. vver before has a serious scientific
Gingerich, Shirley E. Field, Edgar atempt been made.
0. Johnson, Herbert A. Kenyon, With the American minister will
John H. Muyskens, David L. Rich, '> John Bower, Canadian war vet-
Ira M. Smith, and Orlando M. Ste- c :an and Colombian oil geologi'st,
phenson. 'd Dr. George Bevier, head of the
Inspection Eegan in 1870. £ockfeller Foundation for the Study
High school inspection through- Tropical Disease. Bower has con-
c he state has been conducted Qicted a preliminary survey of Toli-t
by the University for the past 60 ma's approaches and believes he
years. It was established in 1870 at gs discovered a practicable route
the suggestion of Prof. Henry Frieze if ascent.
fuomer p esident pro-tem, and in They will travel with pack mules'
the 1890's a committee on diploma hove the timber-line, two miles up,
schools was organized. Allen Whit- end then, with light kits, will try
ncy tool: charge of the task of sur- ea next mile on foot. Much of
veying the state's secondary insti- their way will be over glacier walls'
tutions itn 1899 and he was succeed-"°hich, thus far, have blocked ad-
ed by James Edmonson, present venturers.
head of the School of Education.I
Dean Edmonson was followed by the!
present incumbent.I
579 High Schools Listed. SDS
For the past several years, how- k
ever, both the state and the Uni-
versity have co-operated in the in-
Sp.ction of high schools throughout
Michigan and now have a total of
579 high schoois on the accredited %vs Mastodon Bones, Fragments
list. This includes 95 precent of the 'of Whale Skeletons Found
state's secondary school population o
and draws from 152,031 students Near Ann Arbor.t
throughout Michigan. More than a
dozen were added within the lasta 'iVES TALK OVER RADIO1
ten months.,
The state's schools are now regu- isappearance of the last ice(
larly inspected at least once every jom the region of Ann Arbor tookc
five years by one of the committee- ,'ace about 30,000 years ago, Dr.!
men chosen from the faculty, the ,u sel C. Hussey, of the geology de-l
chairman, or offici'als of the state "artment, stated in his radio talk
boar', of education. Rating is de- I sterday afternoon on "Michigan
termined upon building equipment, :;uring the Ice Age."I
methods of teaching, records, ex- "At one time the front of theI
cellence in faculty and other major -lacier stood just east of the Den-,
measures of educational worth.|, ;1 building and the Health Serv-c
Schools on the accredited list may ;," he said. Water from the mel-
send students to the University Iing ice, Dr. Hussey said, carried
Without further examination. I ,- f A .

'Backgraund'.
UNITY TO BE EMPHASIZE
"The Dawning era" is to be the
subject of the group of lectures toj
be given this year by the Tolstoyt
league, it was announced today by
the office of the organization. The
lectures have been grouped under
one head so that the idea of unity
Imay be emphasized to the students.
"The League is trying to promote
a new philosophy," Dr. F. S. Onder-
donk, of the architectural college
and faculty advisor to the group,
said. "In this series of talks we will
attempt to give students a basis
on which to build a modern con-
ception of life so that new stand-
is and attitudes wil prevail."
j 'he first of these lectures will
S '*:titled "Back-ground," in which
M of. D. B. McLaughlin of the
astronomy department, will discuss
"our place among the stars." The
lecture will be given at 7 : 0 o'clock
Saturday night in room 231, Angell
Hall. Other subjects to be discussed
in the future include; "Martyrs of
Peace and Justice," "Prophets, H.
G. Wells and L. N. Tolstoy," '4Diet,"
"Religion," and "Language" and
"Politics."
Kentucky tobacco fields are ex-
pected to yield a crop of 398,277,000
pounds this year.

EDUCATION VCLUB
WILL MEET TODAY
District Teachers Will Attend
Meeting in Detroit.
District nine of the Michigan Ed-
ucational society will meet today
and tomorrow in Detroit, Dean
James B. EdmonsQn of the School
of Education, stated yesterday.
The program will consist of a
general meeting of the entire dis-
I trict, division meetings for teachers
l of groups of grades, and section
meetings for those interested in the
teaching of special subjects.
Prof. Clarence D. Thorpe of the
English department will preside at
the English section meeting while
Fred Walcott of the University High
school faculty will lecture at the
same meeting. M. L. Byrn, also of
the University High school, will lead
the round table discussion of the
manual arts and industrial educa-
tion meeting. Warren R. Good of the
same school and Dr. Theodore R.
Running, of the engineering col-
lege will speak to the mathematius
group. Dr. George C. Kyte and Prof.
Clifford Woody, both of the School
of Education, will talk at an ele-
mentary meeting.
Strunk Will Lecture
at Zoology Seminar
Announcement was made yester-
day of the first zoology seminar of
the year to be held at 7:30 o'clock
Thursday night, Nov. 6, in room
2116, Natural Science building. Dr.
Peter Okkleberg, of the department
of zoology, stated yesterday that
William Strunk will speak on "Ter-
ritory in Mammal Life."

Jef'erscn C:Iff-ry, Anerica minister to Colombia is organizing an expedition to ascend Nevado del Tolima
hoping to fi. there poef ° a; the present equator was once the Arctic region.

They will be aided in their at-
tempt by the most modern alpineS
equipment available. It is being
shipped from the United States to
the American legation here at Mr.
Caffery's expense. The expedition
will be made in January to take ad-
vantage of the summer heat which,
it is believed, will serve to break
down the lower glacial barriers.
The American diplomat is well
fitted to lead the expedition. An

enthusiastic mountain-climber in
North and South America, he holds
the record of also having made the
ascent of the volcano Asama San,
in Japan. His climb in Colombia
will be reminiscent of his experi-
ences in Japan, for Tolima shares
with the famous Japanese height,
Fujiyama, the distinction of being
one of the two most perfect moun-
tain cones in the world.
Tolima. is regarded as one of the

few, if not the only, equatorial
places in which remnants of the
Pliocene Arctic areas might be
found. Frozen fast, in the polar
cold of millions of years, the Ameri-
can explorers may be able to find
the proof of the geologi!c theory
that the world once upset on its
axis, putting part of its tropics at
the north and south poles and its
Arctic regions on the equator.

Complete Line of Everything Musical

THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Ot PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK At ADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS

HARMON Y REIGNS AMONG FEA THERED
RESIDENTS OF UNIVERSITY MUSEU14

Nineteen Varieties of Michigan
Birds Shown in Natural
Surroundings.
"Birds of a feather flock togeth-
er," says the proverb . .. but not at
the University museum.
Throwing caution to the winds, it
has housed together 19 species of
Michigan's feathered creatures in
one large case. Of course, any petty
quarrels have been prevented by the
minor matter of having all of the
birds stuffed.
A walk of 15 feet in front of the
"Michigan Birds" display revealed'
winged friends in the process of
nesting, eating, cooing, and sight-
seeing. The wide-billed female rud-
dy duck was bending her neck,
seemingly in the act of searching
for food, while her masterful mate
kept guard with a lift of hi's sight-
ly red neck. Their friend, the ring-
necked duck, looked on only six
inches away and uttered not a
sound.
Far over in the bird-land, at least
three feet away, the caspian tern
COURSEY DIRECTS
BAND FORMA TIONS

was haughtily raising his red bill
in the air, as if to snub his neigh-
bor, an elegant black duck who was
resplendent in the beauty of his
blue-brown wings. Another couple,
the old squaw family, who evident-
ly were awaiting the arrival of a
new squaw, were beautiful with
their snow white throats.I
Domestic happiness wasn't both-'
ering the Canaditan goose, however.
He was having a glorious tme arch-
ing his long, black neck in defiance
of the loon in the opposite end of
the case, who seemed to be laugh-
ing at the silly old goose; for hadn't
he something the gander couldn't
boast, a white stomach and a spec-
kled back?
"Who cares," the bald-pate seemed
to say, "a white head denotes wis-
dom, and wisdom is the greatest of
all possessions."
Police Arrest Passer
of Worthless Checks
Charged by police with passing
worthless checks, Wallace B. Doyle
was arrested Tuesday afternoon on
a complaint to be signed by Marvin
Slater, 1441 E. Park place. Police
were holding a quantity of mer-
chandise which they claimed Doyle

What's
Going
On

il

Terms to Suit

t

I

f y
Theaters.
Majestic-"Ltmiox" by Fannie
Hurst; added features.
Michigan-"Love in the Rough"
with Robert Montgomery.
Wuerth-"They Learned About
Women" with Van & Schenk.
Organizations.
Observatory Journal club-Meet-
ing at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon
on the observatory classroom.
Cercle Francais-Meeting at 7:45
o'clock tonight in room 408, Ro-
mance Languages building.
Applied Mechanics-Colloquium
at 8 o'clock tonight in room 445,
West Engineering building.
Municipal Administration club-
Monthly dinner meeting at 6:30
o'clock tonight in the League.
A cucumber two feet in circum-
ference and 15 inches long, weigh-
ing three pounds, five ounces was
raised by a Fort Morgan, Colo.,
farmer.
TYPEWRITING AND
MIMEOGRAPHING
A specialty for twenty
years. Prompt service.
Experienced operators.
Moderate rates.
O. D. MORRILL

e

i

UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynard & William
Phone 7515

41

N

F. .

I

P Y CISTS MAKE
RA D0 TULBE TEST

u grea quanii es or san ana
RADIO 1TODAY.
"Wives-in-Law," a play writ-
ten by Elizabeth W. Smith, Grad,
will be presented at 2 o'clock this
afternoon over WJR by the play
production class of the Univer-
citv rh CC-rni~ fV~lT-

I uf: r dF

Hessel
Action

Conduct Re-
of Electrons.

I y. The cast consists of Eveiyn
Gregory, Lynne Adams, Harry
Whether your radio set is a fine Allen and Franklin Comins. The
musical instrument or a generator production w a s directed by
of noisy disturbances depends I Allen.
largely on the type of radio tubes
i has, according to Dr. W. S. Hux- gravel, and spread it out into a
ord of the engineering research flat plain which is now the campus
division of the physica department, of the University.
~ho, toget er with Mr. John Hes- BOX
sI of that epartment, is studying "The mastodon was especially
the mechanism by which electrons common around Ann Arbor, and its
are emitted from the coating of bones have been found in many
the filament wires. swamps and bogs near the city,"
In order to obtain more perfect 1e said in speaking of the animal
r°su'ts, the radio tubes are man- Ii'e of the period. "These animals
mlactured in the laboratory here. ,urvived in Michigan long after the
The standard parts are assembled I ice l'ad melted from this region and
in different ways, and then tested j only a few thousand years ago they
for the efficiency of the arrange- must have been a very common
ment. Most of the tubes are of a sight."
special design for the study of the Following the ice age, according
properties of filament coating. to Dr. Hussey, there was a fairly
The currents which supply power direct water-way between this state
for amplification of the small radio and the ocean. Whales followed up
signals received on the antenna one of these old water connections
ae composed of electrons coming and eventuallyreached Michigan
fromn a heated emitting element in where they perished of starvation.
a vacuum tube. Proof of this condition is found in
the fragments of their skeletons
Honorary Architectural which have been preserved for us
* ,. ... ~ in this vicinity, he said.

Varsity-R.O.T.C. Group to Leave had purchased with the checks.
According to police, who claimed
for Harvard Thursday. that Doyle had at one time used
the name "Allen Edwards," he had
Under the tutelage of Lieutenant a car belonging to William Holst, of
R. R. Coursey of the R. O. T. 9., the Granite City, Illinois, in a down-
Varsity band is drilling daily in town garage at the time of his
preparation for the Harvard game f arrest.
at Cambridge, a week from next
Saturday, Robert A. Campbell, trea-
surer of the University and sponsor
of the band, announced yesterday. LAST
Practice for new, formations is al- TIMES
ready under way, he stated. Al- TODAY
though the date is more than a
week away, the nature of the move-
ments are such that they require a THE WORLD'S DEST
large amount of rehearsing. The
formations which will probably be VAN &
formed are a "HELLO," "MAR- IV N
VARD," a block "H," and a blocki rr
"M." The entire band, consisting of in their first
96 pieces, will make the trip, Camp- ""THEY LEARNED
bell added, and will leave on the
special tramn, Thursda y afternoon, with BESSIE 'LOVE;

l
C

te ecleanest lI ker-
the ermof

314 South State St.

Phone 6615

71

4 t

Shows
Today
2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

I

VAUDEVILLE TEAM
SCHENCK
talking picture
ABOUT WOMEN"
and BENNY RUBIN

Society Initatesr Pour
Q-art-rdeck, honorary n a v a1
architectural society, held its fall
initiation at the Union by taking
into membership four men. W. H.
Balwin, G. E. Forster, J. B. Muir,
and :. B. Rogers were those ini-
tiated.
Fourteen activ - members were,
!tilenle i nc "^l _ l ' inHerbt
Ther Caci of ecring col-
lrge, Prof. E. Bragg, Prof. A. E.
indbladand Prof. . C. Adams,

Forestry Professors
to Aid at Belle Ile
Prof. S. W. Allen and Prof. E. V.
Jauter are leaving tomorrow for De-
troit where they will identify trees
for labelling along the new Bellej
Isle trail, it was announced yester-
day.
The work is done in co-operation'
with the local garden club organ-
Jzation and the Detroit park de-

BRIGH T SPOT
802 PACKARD'STREET
TODAY, 5:30 to 7:00
LIVER AND BACON
HA' "',C SEAK
FR IED ONIONS
POT ROAST OF BEEF
WITH
NOODLES, CARRIOTS, PEAS
SPINACH
ROAST LOIN 6F PORK
APLE S!UCE
AU GRATIN 0R FRIED
'OTATES
SPINACH OR PEAS
3 c
WE DELIVER

VAN and SCHENCK, famous vaudeville headliners, are here in their first
full-length talking picture. No one can put over a song as they can--
and they have many hits in this picture! And talk about laughs! You'll
never stop howling! What a picture! What a cast!

OU don't have to make any
one of the teams to have
"Athlete's Foot." The glee club
probably has some victims. The
man who gets -all his exercise
out of differential calculus, not
to mention the "crammer" and
the "plugger," -nay be wonder-
ing about that redness between
the toes, wb i-t-c-h-icn-g. Or it
may show up with a thick, moist
skin conditionm. Or again, With
tiny blisters on toes,-or a dry.
ness'with scales.
The fact is,'all these symptoms
point straight at the ringworm
erm known to the boys in
cience Hall'as tinea trichophy-
ton. This tiny parasite of the
'vegetable kingdom has infected
about half the'men in college,
according 'to many authorities.
The U. S. -Ialth Service reports
that "at least half of all adults
suffer from it at some time."
Universities as far apart as Cal-
ifornia and Pennsylvania have
found 50% of the men infected.'
And the co-eds get it too. Little
tinesa trichophytonhas made it-
self 'a campus .pest.
It lurks in the very places

where we all go for cleanliness
and health-on the edges of
rwimming pools and showers-
in gymnasiums-on locker-and
dressing room floors. In spite of
modern sanitation (you have to
boil socks 15 minutes to kill it)
this fungus parasite infects and
re-infects bare feet almost any
time they come in contact with
damp floors.
~,Absorbine Jr. kills the
germ of
"ATHLETE'S FOOT"
Tests in a famous New York
"lab" have revealed that Absor-
bine Jr. penetrates flesh-like
tissues deeply and that wher-
ever it penetrates, it KILLS the
ringworm germ.
It might not be a bad idea to
examine your feet tonight. At
the first sign of the symptoms
mentioned, douse on Absor-
bine Jr. And keep a bottle
handy in your locker as a pre-
ventive. Use it after every expos-
ire of bareeet on damp floors.
At all druggists-$1.25. W. F.
Young, Inc., Springfield, Mass.

U

c

FORE! NOW SHOWING
Watch Out for the Breeziest, Funniest, Fastest, Most Tuneful
Talkie This Year
.CJ~ Golf and Romance-What a Two-some

partment. '

DAILY AT
2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

NOW
PLAYING

I

I

S "o
v

"LOVE IN THE ROUGH"
WITH

0
yy/}} ((
N IV LrAF

ROBERT MONTGOMERY
DOROTHY JORDAN-BENNIE RUBIN

The Story That Has Capti-

etro

- ADDED-
Sound News Pathe Audio Review

MI _ ,"0--

.

slorl- I

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-MI rui

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