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October 29, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Aft Isx

THE

MICHIGAN

DAILY

PASSES EXPECTED, TO DECfUE .COA

J TEST

Barry Wood and Harry Newman
Seen as Outstanding
Pass Throwers.'
WOLVES LINE STRONGER
When Michigan goes up against
Harvard a week from the coming
Saturday at Cambridge, it is ex-
peoted that football fans will wit-
ness a game in which the parts
played by two masters of the for-
ward pass will largely determine
the outcome. Harvard, although it
has a fairly effective running at-
tack, is likely to depend upon Barry
Wood for its long gains, whilethe
Wolverines will probably bank on
the arm of Harry Newman.
Even though Wood has not been
going as well for the Crimson this
year as he did in 1929, Coach Ar-
nold Horween wil undoubtedly use
hime overtime in an effort to re-
peat the forward passing attack*
that came so close to upsetting the
Maize and Blue last year. Wood's
passes at that time carried the
Harvard team almost the entire
length of the field, and the threat
of a touchdown was imminent until
he finally passed over the goal line
with seconds to spare.
]Pass Defense Good.
Remembering the success with
which he used theoverhead game
against the Wolverines before, it is
a safe bet that Horween will at
least try to repeat that success
this season. It is likely, however,
that he will find a different Michi-
'gan team opposing him, a team
that has built up a wonderful de-
fense for that type of game. 1
With such backfield men as
Wheeler, Simrall, Hudson, and
Newman guarding against an over-
head attack like they did in the
games with Purdue, Ohio State,
and Illinois, the threat of Harvard
touchdowns through this type of,
game appears to be much less idan-
gerous than at this time a year ago.
Offense Improved.
While Michigan's pas defense
has improved greatly, its offensive
in the same type of game has also,
improved. With Simrall and Trus-1
kowski tossing long, but ineffective,1
heaves last year, Michigari's pass
attack was at best, only' a threat.
This season, however, the great su-
cess with which Newman has tossed
his passes, assuresthe Wolverines
of a weapon that may at any time
bring a touchdown.
With no game scheduled for this
weekend, Michigan's gidiron candi-
dates again took a rest yesterday.
Today they will swing back into
action to prepare for the Crimson
clash on November 8.
Har'vard Loses Twice.
Whil 'Michigan is taking a week
off, due to a Conference ruling that
forbids the team from playing on
eight successive Saturdays, 4rvard
will be playing William anerMary,
a team that should not cause them
a great deal of trouble. After a good
start, the Harvard team has lost
its last two games, one to Army
and one to Dartmouth. Both teams,
however, must be classed as among
the best in the East, and the fact
that Harvard lost to thei does not
indicate that the Crimsoh has not
a first class eleven.
SALT LAKE CITY-George Von
Elm, former amateur golf cham-
pion, took his first $500 As a pro-
fessional in the tourney here when
he tied with Craig Wood for t hrd
and fourth places.

I
i
1
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i
9

NQTRE DAME BACK HIT HARD,
BY MMVURDO, PANTHER END
1 ~
r 1
I }.
.* ... . ...4 . * * 4 . . . . . . . . . . } . a . ; . ". Y h w . . w " w -y : : w w w + w . . w - - .v - r . . i
Associated PressPhorc
Jaskwhich, Eubstitute Irish signal caller, is shown doing a one-armed
handspring when tackled by a Pittsburgh end, Mc'lurdo, in Saturday's
game in which the Ramblers walloped the Panthers in a one-sided affair

Baker, Nildcat Wing
Tops BigTen Scorers

Player & Team G
Baker, N. W. . .4
Rentner, N. W. 4
Yanuskus, Ill. .4
Rebholz, Wis. ..4
Newman, Mich. 3
Behr, Wis. .....4
Russell, N. W .2
Oman, Wis. .3
Hanley, N. W. ..4
Berry, Ill......4
Purvis, Purdue 4

Td Fg Pat Tp

32
24
21
20
18
18
18
18
13
13
13

MANN FACES- TASK
Single Veteran Swim SiarBack
From ]Last Year's Squad
of Outstanding Men.
SOPHOMORES LOOK GOOD

WHEELER SNARES LONG PASS
FQR FIRST WOLVERINE SCORE
i~a
OY v
Associae rs ht
Jack Wheeler, veteran Wolverine half back is shown grabbing New-
-an's20-yard eve inthe frsttwo minutesh ongplaynoflast Saturday'
axei wi heWlernsdwndte:ihig iii ya1-7sae
Wheeler also did th ' michigan punting after Captain Simrall was kinock-
ed out while making a tackle.
,v 4i l *
Assoited resPh

4y a score of 35-19. Despite the fact that Coach Matt
Mann was able to build up a well
MACALUSO TAKES SCORING LEAD; balanced tank squad which took
FORDHAM GOAL STILL UNCROSSED second place in the national rank-
____I -ing last year, he is faced with a,
(By Associated Press) total for five games to 70 points, most difficult task if he is to re-
NEW YORK, Oct. 27.-Only eight which were assembled by the peat that record. With the excep-
teams in the east remained unde- means of nine touchdowns and the tion of one man, the entire array
feated after games, and of these kicking of 16 extra points. of star natators who swam for
Dartmouth's White Indians and Jim Murphy, who led the pack a Michigan last year has graduated.
Fordham's Rams had the most week ago, counted Fordham's only Sophomores make up the ma-
impressive records. Each has won touchdown in the New York Uni- jority of aspirants who are under
five straight games. Army, Cornell, versity game but trailed the Col- Coach Mann's tutelage at the
Western Maryland and Allegheny gate star b four t H present time'. Valentine, who is the
v we s av been poins.d is 661lone survivorof the 1929-30 squad,
have w n four apiece, but Army points having ben tied. touchdo is captain of the new men. He was
dtouchdowns.given national recognition in the
Dartmouth's speedy and power- I Macaluso also led the high scor- back stroke division last year.
ful backs have piled up a total of I ers in booting points after touch- Other men who are bidding for
232 points against two for their op-1downs with a total of 19. Hewitt, ,places on the team for the coming
ponts a ttiof Columbia, joined Scalzi, of tan ompetition include Ladd
ponents to lead the east in scor- Georgetown and Booth, of Yale, as who is working in the quarter mile
ing. Colgate, although defeated the only top notchers to kick a class. Miller is attempting to hold
once in five games is second with field goal.
225 points to their rivals' 14. Car- g w Wright pering ithe
negieTech also has passed the Player & College. G Td Pat Tg Tot fancy diving division.
200-point mark, scoring 204 points
and having 37 tallied by its rivals. Macaluso, Colgate.. 5 9 16 0 70 The Varsity t'ank team will also
Only Fordham can boast an un- L. Murphy, Fordham 5 i 0 0 66 miss the splendid work of Walker,
crossed goal line. The Rams have Viviano, Cornell .... 4 19 0 0 60 Walaitis, and Hosmer who, together
tallied 160 points while holding Tanguay, - N. Y. U.. . .5 9 5 0 59 with Smith, formed the world
theit rivals scoreless. Hewitt, Columbia...5 5 1 56 championship 160 yard relay team
Scoring 28 points against Penn Goff, Rhode sland..5 9 0 0 54 which represented the University
State, Leonard Macaluso, Colgate's Grossman, Rutgers. .' 9 0 0 54 last season. Smith is the only man
pluhiing fullback, jumped into the Uith, Carnegie Tech.5 9 0 0 54 who will'be available for the water
lead -in eastern individual scoring. Foster; Bowdein.....4 9 0 0 54 relay squad this season, and it is
Four touchdowns and four points Stevens, Syracuse.. .5 8 0 0 48 around this man that Coach Mann
after touchdown sent Macaluso's Dubinsky, C: C.N. Y..5 8 0 0 48 must build an entirely new team.
-,N=

By JOE RUSSELL.
Although without doubt a game
played between the University of
Detroit and the University of Mich-
igan would be of great benefit to
the unemployed in the city of De-
troit, such a game is nearly beyond
the realm of possibility as far as
Michigan is concerned.-
There are two very definitea
rulings in the Big Ten which
prohibit just such games. First
there is a rule that all sched-
ules must be completed by the
Saturday before Thanksgiving,
and second that teams in the
Western Conference can play
inter-collegiate games only on
eight Saturdays, and no more
than two games on any one
day.
The first rule eliminates such a
game since a date before Thanks-
giving would be impossible to ar-
range due to the completion of
the present schedules for which the
two schools have already arranged.
There remained only two possible
days when both the U. of D. and
the Wolverines could get together,
Thanksgiving, and December 13.
Both of these dates are automati-
cally ruled out due to the laws of
the Faculty Board of the' Western

Confer nce.
Then too, there is the eight
game situation. Michigan has
an open date this weep because
it would have been impossible
to start the season in Septem-
ber and play through till the
last game without this open
date. Michigan is already play-
ing on eight Saturdays, and
any other arrangement would
be a direct violation of the
Conference ruling. It seems
that these objections would
satisfy those wishing the game,
since Michigan is in no position
to jeapordize its position in the
Big Ten by forcing the issue
against the rules of that organ-
ization.

I

A meeting of the Board In Con-
trol of Athletics has been called for
this Saturday noon, when the
members will decide whether to pe-
tition the Conference Board to al-
low the game, but it seems that no
matter what their decision will
be, the game will be impossible.
Even should the ruling body of the
Big Ten be in favor of such an ar-
rangement, it would be difficult
for them to sanction the game af-
ter their ruling on the Northwest-
(Continued on Page 7)

i

ovemaer

THEL LONG, LEAN
HAND OF FASHION
Like Fu Chow How's hairy hand, it vi-
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that collars be 'pinned! We impaled our'
Adam's apples. We felt as a bull must
feeh receiving the matador's thrust. The
~fro-its of our shirts showed crimson. We
reviled and rebelled, but relentless fashion
insisted on fastened collars. Then came
Swank: It looks like a pin, but isn't. You
slip Swank on and slip it off without sword-
play and blood. The long, lean hand
of fashion is long and lean no longer-but
rather like a pale hand that is loved be-
side the Shalimar. Get a Swank today.
Keep your collar neat and trim. Gold-
filled or solid gold. Plain, fancy and sport
designs in vriouzs lengths. Jewelers' or
uen's showo. 5 th."Eos to $10.

TEN DOLLARS
Really a man's shoe-constructed
for f o ot c om fo rt and foot
protection. Made by Master
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imported leathers.
n black or tan.
TiE...

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Novemnber loth at

I

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