100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1930

THE MIC~HIGAN fDAIL

.L --Xo 1141,31im

I

. a _.._--_-_

l 17 nW ' 1111ww1

PROVIDED SUMMER
STUDY SKAW TELLS
Director of Alumni Relations
Describes Work Done by
Michigan Expedition.
ENCOUNTER HARDSHIPS
Enterprise Proves Modern View
Toward Comparative
Research.

TWO THOUSAND OF DETROIT'S JOBLESS MARCH
TO CITY HALL AFTER DEMONSTRATION IN PARK

- _f _ _ ___. m l

cr nrmimnrai --n ivni n I

I!

! , . I

3

II L II I I What's
LETI £_T OGoing
First Year Men Will Nominate On
Captain for Annual

i

Mountain growth, as well as th
general study of the plants and an
imals of the San Carlos region i
Mexico, furnished a busy season'
work for a large' expedition sen
out by the University last summer
it was revealed' yesterday by Wil-
fred B. Shaw, directorof alumn:
relations.
The present tendency in scien-
tific investigation toward compar-
ative research by various agen-
cies was seen in the Michigan ex-
pedition, which was made possib
by cooperation"of the National Re-
search council, the University of
Chicago, Johns Hopkins university,
and Michigan.
Left in June.
Leaving the University in June
the expedition went directly to
the San Carlos mountains by mo-
tor truck. The country, which was
entered hundreds of years ago by
Spanish explorers who worked the
mountain mines for their precious
metals, still remains' thinly-set-
tled and the roads, built for ox-
carts, furnished many difficulties.
Though a settled region the dif-
ficulties of entering were almost
as great as in original exploration.
At many of the scattered ranches
the Michiganhcars were the first
to enter, and some of the native
residents had never seen an auto-
mobile, while modern scientific
equipment left them bewildered,
Dr. Lewis Kellum, geologist, stated.
Bastin on Sttf.
The personnel of the expedition
included Dr. Edson S.. Bastin, econ-
omic geologist, Michigan alumnus
and head of the geology depart-
ment at the Univerity of Chicago;
Prof. Harley H. Bartlett, of the
botany department' of the Univer-
sity; Prof. Lee R. Dice, curator of
mammals in the University muse-
um.
Edward H. Watson, of the gology
department at Johns Hopkins; Dr.
Lewis B. Kellum of the University
geology department; Ralph W. Im-
lay, graduate assistant in the Uni-
yersity, and George W. Rust, stu-
dent at the University of Chicago,
were also on the staff.
COMMISSION WILL
CONDUCT HEARING
New Tariff Body Opens Session
to Consider Rates.
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 28. - The
much-debated flexible provision of
the 1930 tariff act came back to the
center of the stage today as a new
United States tif comrnissioln
opened its first public hearing for
altered rates under the new pro-
vision.
Near-winter weather prevailed
outside as the hearing began-deal-
ing with the tariff rates on straw
hats.
The meeting today was the first
of 14 hearings to be held by the
commission this and next month,
on products ranging from pig iron
to soup.
As domestic producers and im-
porters of straw hats met to present
varying sides of the case in the big
commission hearing room, there was
a sprinkling also of those interested
in other procedure of the new group.
Urider the flexible provision of
the Fordney-McCumber act of 1922,
the commission, weeks in advance
of any hearing, sent out a list of
facts already uncovered by its own
investigation of the cost of produc-
tion 'in this country and abroad.
Organized Pistol Club
Attacked by Minister
(By Associated Press)
EVANSTON, Ill., Oct. 28.-The or-
ganization here of a pistol club to
combat cr'ime with bullets wars' at-

tacked today by Rev. J. J. Steffens
as a "romantic invitation to gang-
sters and" thieves to compete 'with
honest men in the shooting game."

Nearly 2,000 unemployed marched to Detroit's city hail followinga
city's parks.' ,Thlie huge army of jobless, part of which is shown above,i
and placards voicing general disapproval with existing conditions, wer

MIMES HE UE gssod%
fOH MU lG, L9R!r

ANN ARBOR I

Allan
for

Callahan Issues Request
Original Compositions
for Production.

POLI
TO.
Comstoc
vy7; i a I

DESIRES CAMPUS SKITS

Another call for original music ticgu
'and lyrics was issued yesterday by the prin
Allan B. Callahan, chairman of the election:
music committee for the Mimes Democra
revue, which is to be presented dur- the Whi
- The m
ing the first week in December. portant
"We will need a great deal more Washten
music, both for songs and dances, for theE
and many more lyrics," stated 4. Anotl
Callahan. ned Thu
"I want to urge all students who publicans
have any kind of musical ability to eral Wilb
attempt some pieces for the coming lican car
production. It is to be an all-stud- be the
ent affair, and we want to have a meeting<
great deal more music than we ney thea
have at present in order to start Comsto
the tryouts for the show soon." late this
The revue, which is expected to On the
take the place of the opera, will be Comstock
presented by Mimes, campus dra-
matic organization, which produced dams Co
the annual Union opera until its County S
abolition last year. Besides music County c
And lyrics, the committee in charge troduced,
desires written skits of a humorous A Repi
vein, as well as feature numbers, lake, with
pertaining to campus matters. Michigan
All contributions may be left at principal
the desk of the Union. The final night.
date for submitting them will be
Nov. 7, after which the committee
in charge will select the material
to be used and issue a call for try-
outs. Both men and women will be
included in the cast and choruses
of the production. .

TICAL RALLY
BE HELD HERE
ck, Brucker to Address
Party Meetings.
m A. Comstock, Democra-
rnatorial candidate, will be
.cipal speaker at a pre-
rally of Washtenaw county
ts at 8 o'clock tonight in
tney theater.
eeting will be the first im-
political rally held in
aw county in preparationj
election which comes Nov.
her rally, however, is plan-
rsday night by county Re-
s, at which Attorney Gen-
ber M. Brucker, the Repub-
ndidate for governor, will
principal speaker. This
also will be held in Whit-
ter.
ock is scheduled to speak
afternoon at Ypsilanti.
e tonight's program with
k will be Edward Frens-
ngressional candidate, and
chermerhorn, of Detroit.
andidates will also be in-
committee members said.
ublican rally at Whitmore
h Dr. Charles McKenny of
State Normal college the
speaker, was held last

Fall Games.
NAME CHANGED DATE
k rChanges in the dates selected fo
the freshman and sophomore meet-
ings to be held before the annual
fall games, were announced yester-
day by Albert F. Donohue, '31, presi-
dent of the Union. These meetings
are under the direction of the un-
derclass committee of the organiza-
tion.
The freshman meetings will be
held en Wednesday Nov. 12, instead
of on Thursday as originally an-
nounced. At that time, the 10 groups
will meet and a nominee for the
I freshman captain for the games
will be selected from each group.
After the group meetings, the first-
year men w:vl meet in the ballroom
Associated Press Photo where a captain will be elected from
a demonstration h= d rs one of the the group nominees.
moved without any disorder. Banners Captains of some of the major
re carriedduring t pe archInersathletic teams as well as a number
I of students prominent in campus
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ life will speak to the freshmen at
the mass meeting. A representative
of the faculty will give a pep talk
N EWt-BRIEFS tothe first year men and smokes
wrill be provided by the Union. The
entire third floor of the Union
building will be given over to the
~ freshman group meetings.
Attempt to b Home The organization meeting of the
sophomores will be held on Thurs-
Frustrated by Pdlice day, Nov. 13. The second year men
will choose their captain and will
Charged with entering the home prepare for the games which con-
of Sam Andrews, by the use' of a sist of the pillow fight, the cane
skelton key, Ben Duval, 501 North spree and the flag rush.
Main street, was arrested by po- Grange Master Urges
lice shortly after he attempted to R
escape, according to officers, with Relie f___x urden
a fur coat, a lady's purse, and a (By Associated Dress)
bunch of keys. Duvall is in jail COLDWATER, Oct. 28. - Enact-
awaiting trial. ment of a state income tax, defeat
~---of the reapportionment amendment
COmrn 3n fy F d Drie adoption of the cigaret tax law,
I more state aid in the building town-
Nets Total of $23,730 ship highways and operating public
schools and an investigation pf wa-
A total of $23,730 has been terpower resources were among the
pledged in the Community Fund's major issues stressed today in the
campaign to raise $62,000, accord- !annual message of George F. Rox-
ing to a report ea~m captainsburgh, state master, at the opening
ingdto re t t aptains session of the fifty-seventh annual
and officials of the drive made at convention of the Michigan State
a luncheon held yesterday in the Grange.
Chamber of Commerce building. The only hope of equalizing the
The amount, it was said, exceeds ever-growing tax burden, Roxburgh
by $2,500 the total pledged and re- said, is through a fair distribution
ported at the first luncheon of the of an income tax for state purposes
Fund in its drive last year. and for schools.
Dr. Harley A. Hayes, director of
the University hospital, announced
receipt of special gifts totalling
$11,000. This amount, however, is
lower than that reported last year,
Miss Edith Owen, executive secre-
tary, said. -

Theatres.
7ajestic-"Lummox" with Win-
nifred Westover.
Michigan-"Top Speed" with Joe
r E. Brown and Bernice Claire.
Wuerth - "They Learned About
Women" with Van & Schenk.
Organizations.
Sigma Rho Tau - Meeting at
17:30 o'clock tonight at the Union.
Glider Section-Meeting at 7:30
o'clock tonight in 348 West Engin-
ecring building.
Sigma Alpha Iota-Tea at 3:30
o'clock this afternoon in the Grand
Rapids room of the League.
Delta Omicron-Meeting at 7:15
o'clock tonight in the League build-
ing.
3oston Banquet Brings
jCuga nto Ann Arbor
Dr. Arthur McGugan, '92M, pres-I
dent of the University of Michi-
gan club of New England, arrived
in Ann Arbor yesterday to confer
with T. Hawley Tapping, general
secretary of the Alumni association
concerning the banquet to be held
in Boston the night before the
Michigan-arvarfootball game.
Dfr. McGugan spoke Monday be-
fore members of the University of
Michigan club at Chicago. Before
returning east he will address
Salumni organizations in Buffalo,
Rochester, and Schenectady.
POTSDAM, Germany -Princess
Hermine, wife of Wilhelm Hohen-
zollern, has visited the Hohen-
zollern, mausoleum and prayed at
the tomb of. his first wife, Em-
press Augusta Victoria.

GERHMAN PU-ITIC
Professor Pollock to Speak on
Recent Reich Elections
at Campus Forum.
S. C. A. SPONSORS TALK
"German Politics in Transition"
will be the subject of a talk by
Prof. James K. Pollock, of the poli-
tical science department, at 4:15
o'clock Thursday in room D. Alum-
ni Memorial hall. This is the third
All Campus forum of the series,
sponsored annually by the Stu-
dent Christian association.
German politics have been an
especial interest of Dr. Pollock,
and according to reports, he is
particularly well qualified to speak
upon the subject. The topic for
the forum was chosen because of
its timeliness, William Kearns, '31,
chairman of the Open forums com-
mittee of the Student Christian as-
sociation stated yesterday. The re-
cent election in Germany which
aroused world wide interest, and
the coming election here in the
United States, about which there is
much controversy at the present,
will be compared and discussed by
Dr. Pollock.
The speaker has travelled exten-
sively in Germany during the past
few years, and was present at the
last two elections that were held
there. 1
The forum will be conducted a-
long the same lines as those that
have already taken place this year.
The speaker will talk for 'about
twenty or thirty minutes to open
up the subject and give his hearers
a foundation of facts about the
subject. The questions following
the speakers address are to give the
audience a chance to express their
interest in some particular phase

of the subject.

ENJOY YOUR SUNDAY DINNER

AT

FREEMAN'S

DINING

ROC IV

75c

Clean, Pleasant and With Excellent Service

I

ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

*. ~

-1

. _._...e .i
- i

Has YOUR kitchen stove
these ELECTROCHEF* features?

::
s'

.,r - _ - -

PHYSICIST WORKS
IN SPECTROSCOPY
Professor Plyler Uses Michigan
Research Laboratories.
Prof. E. K. Plyler, of the physics
department at the University of
North Carolina, is here, during his
sabbatical leave, conducting some
special research work in a study
of infra-red absorption of mole-
cules.
"The physics laboratories here
are better equipped for the work in
infra-red spectroscopy than any
others in the world," s'aid Professor
Plyler recently. "The physics build-
ing is very well designed for all
types of research, and with a base-
mient 40 feet under ground, it is
possible to conduct many differ-
ent experiments without the dis-
turbance of a changing tempera-
ture or annoying vibrations."
Professor Plyler is greatly im-
pressed by the students here. "They
seem to be one or two years older
than those we have at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina," he said.
CHICAGO-Jens Schacht, whose"
father, Dr. Hjalmar Schacht, was
formerly president of the Reichs-
bank, is to learn American banking
methods, working a year in First'
National bank, Chicago.

Automatic
tolegraph-,.
transmession
as'repZaced
the
rrt hand

.--
J

//

P, f

$105 installed, including all wiring.
Terms $10 down, balance $6per month.

k

1. Semi-sealed oven. ELECTROCHEF seals in the nourishing
juices of meats and vegetables.
2. Double air-space oven insulation. Two separate air
spaces keep the heat inside the oven.
S. Chromeplate oven interior. Mirror-like walls and
rounded corners reduce cleaning effort.
4. The accurate oven control simplifies baking. No guess-
work with the ELECTROCHEFI
5. Triple-coated porcelain enamel finish on pressed
Armco steel.
6. Focused radiant heat. Electric heat is as clean as
sunlight: No soot or smoke tr soil kitchen walls.
7. Convenient electric outlet. Accommodates electric
toaster, percolator, iron and other appliances.
8. Snap the switch and start to cook. Electric cooking
with the ELECTROCHEF is as simple as your present method.
9. Specially designed Mirro-aluminum utensils. A 7-piece
set is included with every ELECTROCHEF without extra charge.

11

y 1 j 4 ' 1il e .
.
,,
.
1
, 4 .s 1 r14 V k .ns.L V 11 :. f+I
i I ( !
'''' ' I

i
ndn
,p F CY

c

Complete Line of Everything Musical
THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Old PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK IkADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

ir"

y f

r7l,"'7 1. .

VIALT

I

ti

A 113W.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan