100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SEP'Tr ER 30, 1930

' 1 !"! E" . m 'T I T 1. H I i i H T J Al T. V

PAOL Frft

TUEI~A,, EPT~MER 0, 930TIP MC'~$TC M L t 1 2LV
;, " " '°°1 .1 J .V1LJ ....ZL t3, hi IN4 .,E1.L.

.Li7.LiiJ is .i Y, .Lii

j..

,1

w

.

I

LYATi

IC WAwA \

'1

n

f

WIMEN TO PRACTICE HOCKEY THURSDAY
AN LSSAGGR TlNS PREPARE
FOR~~~~~~~~ SAO;IITBEINNPLYR

DOCTORS FIND [AONOPENS FOD!LYDIA MENDELSSO
NE~W STUDEl1NTS~ FETUEANC

.Old and New Players Are Asked!
to Compete for Positions
on Class Teams.
TO MEET AT 4 O'CLOCKj

Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
Receive Gym Credit for I
Participation.
Another hockey season is about
to begin, ushered in by invigorating
cold weather. Practice starts this
Thursday, October 2 and all players,
old and new, are asked to report
at 4 o'clock at the Women's Field
House on Palmer Field. Women
entering the university for the first
time are urged to come out for
practice as it is not necessary to
be an adept player or even to have
played before to compete for a posi-
tion on the interclass teams.
It is interclass competition thatI
stimulates enthusiasm during the
hockey season. For those who haveI
had no experience in the game the
weeks of practice are long enough
to enable one to become proficient'
before the eliminations begin. The
practice hours are conveniently ar-
ranged at 4 o'clock every Tuesday'
and Thursday so that there is no
interference with classes.
Sophomore, junior and senior
women who have not completed
their physical eduation require-
ments may go out for interclass
hockey practice and receive credit
for gym work. Those who have
already signed up for other classes
in the physical education depart-
ment may change their election
without difficulty at Barbour Gym-
rlasium.
The hockey season extends from
September to Thanksgiving con--j
Informality Rules
Summer Activities
Activities of the Women's League
during summer school were of al
purely social character, with in-
formality as the predominating
feature of League entertainments.
,Weekly teas were given by the
Women's League, each honoring
some particular guest. Members of
play production and visiting in-
structors in play production were
thus entertained.
A reception was also given for
Dean -Edward H. Kraus and Mrs.
Kraus, and member's of the Sum-
mer School faculty. At the close
of the Summer session an invita-

Elizabeth Whitney, '31.
cluding with iame annual hockey
banquet at which the awards and
numerals are presented and the
star teams are announced. Those
interested in hockey may get in
touch with Elizabeth Whitney, '31'
ED, hockey manager, by calling
2-3225.f
Madame Clairbert 1
Is Popular Figure
Madame Clare Clairbert, who ap-
pears in a recital in the secondI
Choral Union concert has been a
glamorous figure in the musical
world for over two years. She was
known only as "Madame La Color-
atura" untill recently her identity
was mac); public, and she was re-
vealed as Madame Clare Clairbert l
of the Theatre de la Monnaie of
Brussels.
Madame Clairbert will be heard
for the first time in America this'
fall when she appears with the
San Francisco Opera company. Af-
ter this event late in September
she will give a few song recitals
in the East, her appearance at
Ann Arbor being among the first
of these.
tion was extended to all students
to a dance given by the League.
Miss Lucy Elliot, who was acting
Dean of Women, assisted the
League staff in many of their en-
tertainments, and often took on,
the duties of hostess.

IL I L' iW0 1 J .1. A .. 0j
ARE HEALTHYI
With the conclusion of Fresh-a
man Week and its activities, there
was not one c a s e reported at
Health Service, according to Doc-1
tor Margaret Bell, either for ill-I
ness or for any casualties. SinceI
the rain hindered much of the
program there was much less fa-
tigue than previous years and veryj
few colds.
Approximately 1,550 medical ex-l
ams were given this year, aboutI
1,400 of which were university wo-
men. There were the usual num-
ber of re-checks but the state of
health of those who passed was,
as remarked by the doctors and
specialists, unusually good. It Was
also stated that as a whole the ex-
amination was given to one of the
most intelligent groups. "Each stu-
dent followed her examination up
carefully and paid-close attention
to whatever criticism there was on
her health," commented Dr. Bell.
Several of the women doctors
who assisted in the examinations
are Michigan graduates. They were
Dr. Grace Purdue, who is practi-
cing in Toronto; Dr. Thelma Fel-
lows from Detroit; Dr. Sparling
whose position is in Northville,
Michigan; and Dr. Geraldine Croc-
ker from Denison, Ohio.
Otheis who aided in the examin-
ations are Dr. Margaret Austin of
the heart department at Rush
medical college, Chicago; Dr. Ella
Parsons, assistant professor of
gynecology in Chicago; Dr. Flor-
ence Anies from Monroe; Dr. Anne
Bohning, head of the heart depart-
ment at the Public Health Insti-
tute in Chicago; and Dr. Myra
Cope from Detroit.
Dr. Grace Gorham, Dr. Som-
mett, and Dr. Melissa Ruth, women
internes at the University Hospital
also assisted.
Women on the University of New
York campus have recently formed
a new honorary and professional
journalism society called the Stick
o' Type Club. The club has as its
purpose the bringing about of
actual contact between the students
and prominent working journalists
by arranging talks and meetings.
BUTLER UNIVERSITY-Trips to
Purdue, Illinois, and Wabash will
mark the fall activity of the uni-
versity band. Two road tours will,
also be taken.

Croyla Goya Will Open Season
SORORITY -B10SHING'rol Wl
With ,Colorful Dance
Mrs. Homer Heath Will Inform Recital Saturday.
Freshmen Concerning
Sororities According to the new policy of
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, a'
PARTIES END OCTOBER 12 woman artist, Croyla Goya, will be
--- featured at the theatre opening
Formal rushing, which extends Saturday night. Miss Amy Loomis,
over a period of two weeks, opened director of Lydia Mendellssohn
I yesterday afternoon when sorority 1 theatre, said that the majority of
women made their first calls on the artists engaged would be wo-
prospective rushees. There will be men, and that dancing would be
two parties a day, consisting chiefly j!particularly emphasized.
of teas and dinners, and affairs will I "We wanted a splashy attraction
terminate with the Thursday and for our opening performance," Miss
Friday formal dinners. Pledge Sun- Loomis stated, and felt that a
play is scheduled for Sunday after- dancer would lend the gay spirit
noon, October 12, at 3:30 o'clock. the occasion demanded. Miss Goya
Freshmen who desire information has been studying is Spain for the
concerning sororities in Ann Arborfpast four or five years, traveling
may call the alumnae advisor, Mrs. through the mountains and colon-
Homer Heath, 410 Highland road,! ies where she learned many of the
phone 3767. Dean Alice Lloyd, will old dances not usually featured by
also be glad to inform any woman Spanish dancers. She received her
on sorority matters. technical training in.Spain under
Sororities handing in bids may Otero, from whom she learned the
turn them in Thursday and Friday, more aristocratic type of dances.
October 10 and 11. The lists must "Miss Goya will open her pro-
be in by noon Friday, end must be gram Saturday night with a court
absolutely complete and final. dance, as it is traditional that all
Spanish dancers begin a concert
BUTLER UNIVERSITY - Sorori- with formal presentations. She will'
ties on this campus have pledged I then present several of her own
118 women students. dance creations.

r
resent,'
f j a .; . . . +w^ , yam" "
s

)HN PLANS TO Committee Changes
ING ON PROGRAM] League Dance Ruling
The ruling that has been in force
"In 18 concerts given by this requiring men to present a Union
dancer in New York last year she card in. order to buy a ticket to
played to a packed house every League dances was*'modified at a
night, and left the city with her I meeting of the house committee of
reputation as an artist definitely the Women's League held yesterday
established. Her charm lies in the afternoon.
fact that she is new, young, and must havehome form of identifica-
her dancing is of a distinct type, tion to prove that he is a student,
many of her specialties being orig- I"or be introduced by some woman
inal." Miss Loomis mentioned sev- who is a iember of the League.
eral other famous dancers who
will appear later in the season, UNIVERSITY OF K A N S A S-
though no announcements will be More than 4,000 students have al-
made at this time. ready enrolled in the university.
_ Niel.-

To Women of

34-

I,
THE DIMATTIA BEAUTY SHOP probably has been,
or will be. recommended to you by your adviser whose
counselings will aid you in starting your college career
"right." Every year it is our task to keep faith with these
coeds whose experiences prompts them to direct the first
year women to our shop. We will be awaiting your visits
and look forward with pleasure in serving you during your
four years on campus.
338- South State Street

C
..

0101,
I ul
C11- Fc,
Fcipl .11cs Tip

v ,

..-.

REPTILES-That's the
Fashion word today and
as always .-Jacqueline
presents them in newest
stytes._-The woman who
would be distinctively
dressed will choose gen-
uine reptiles to comple-
ment her fall tailleur.
Mail Qrders promiptly filled

ZZC~

.

ir/I;

I

-.,.
e
A
- T
-i v
t

/

L.f

50

Jacobsn,
Opposite the
Michigan

Phone 8878

Over Parrot

11

I

F m offmom"

i

-

t Y ' ' ::
":i: ~ '
::5
+ :
' ? '
\
...
d ,. ti.,
' .
!
:tY::
::: : !
- . . .
SY!
1(
i
.~
s

Our Second
Anniversary
and we are still

$16.75 Dresses
$11.75
$25.00 Dresses
$14.75

Charming
New
Frocks
-that pass all exam-

a-

II

E have rarely to s
it fail that the M
of Collegiate backgroui
exercises the utmost d
scrimination in selectit
both her apparel and tl
shop at which she buys it
It is significant that
many college girls, as w
as numerous smart matro
have selected this shop

TheNew
AUTUm4f
H°IATXf

11

ee
[iss
nd
e.
ing
he
so
eli
ns
as

$25.00 to $29.75
$18.75
Dresses-Suits
Crepes-Chiffons
Jersey and Tweeds
All Hats $5
Regarless of Former Price
Solies-Suedes
Velours, Felts and Velvets
$1.49, $2.49, .$3.49
Teddies-Daviettes
Stepins and Gowns
Hosiery $1
Chiffon, Full Fashioned
Silk from Top to Toe
Silk
Lounging Pajamas
$3.95

Campus, Afternoon,

inations for

and Evening

Wear.

IRK-
r

Rich transparent velvets, soft chiffons, lustrous satins and Can-

Sports,

I

II

ton crepes, smart featherweight woolens and wool laces, em-
broidered crepes or chiffons. One-piece dresses, two-piece tunic
frocks, two-piece or three-piece jacket frocks in sizes from 11-44.
The featured fashion details are bead trimmings, lace yokes and
trimmings, color contrast, embroidery trimmings, novel sleeve
effects, soft necklines, flattering flares.
BLACKS-BROWNS-GREENS-REDS- WINES
RUSTS-BLUES

11

11

Now that summer is gone and the cool days
fig ahead-our first thought is what kind of a-
,hat, to wear? In answer to this querry we sug-
gest your calling at Jacobson's, 612 East Liberty
Street,
There the fastidious young lady or matron
may find an abundent selection of beautiful new
hats. While the prices are right, you may make
your selection in comfort. We welcome you.

theirs. It is particularly significant that after two
years of association, they STILL prefer the Collins
Shoppe.
A visit during our Second Anniversary sale will
reveal many exceptional savings in the smartest of
Fall dresses, gowns, sport clothes, jewelry, lingerie,
hosiery, millinery, etc.
Make it a point to make your purchases during
the time this sale is on. If possible, stop in TO-
DAY and see for yourself what mere printer's
type fails to adequately describe.

a

Priced
$15-$49.75

I, &AUi\I U M E I

IF c' llillial /Amiss s1

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan