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October 25, 1930 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-25

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN .DAILY

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 25. 1930

o

Published every morning except Monday
""ring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in thie paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,'
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General. .
Subscription by carrier, $4.o; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May
hard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.

-'

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY

thing that should have been done
several years. That is, to prodtce
a campus ravue.
When the Mimes theater was
leased to Play Production, it was
predicted by many that. the doom
of the organization had been seal-
ed. However, they have taken a
step, which, if taken several years
ago, would probably have kept the
Opera-that of localizing the whole
production. According to its an-
nouncement, all scenery,, stage
work, direction and managing will
be done by students. And last but
not least, it will consist of skits and
short acts on campus matters, writ-
ten by students.
Alumni, when they go to students'
productions of one kind or another,
like to be carried back to their col-
lege days. The highly specialized
nature of the Opera soon eliminat-
ed this feature of the show, and
gradually attendance at perfor-
mances dropped off until it was
necessary to do away with the
whole custom. Now, with new
blood in its veins. Mimes has a
chance to put on a show, which, if
it is a success, it is rumored De-
troit alumni wil- bring to Detroit
for a short run. However, we can
wait and hope that the organiza-
tion will not deceive our hopes, and
will really put on a student show,
as was "Michigenda" in 1908..

City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor.............. .Gurney Williams
Editorial Director...........alter W. Wilds
S orts Editor................Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor ............ Mary L. Behymer
Music and Drama...........William JGorman
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Elditor........... eorge A. Stauter
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold 0. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Wilbur J. Myers
Irving J. Blumberg Robert L. Pierce
Donald . Boudeman Sher M.dQuraishi
George T. Callison C. Richard Racine
Thomas M. Cooley Jerry E. Rosenthai
George Fisk George Rubenstein
Yernard W. Freund Charles A. Sanford
Morton Frank Karl Seiffert
Saul Friedberg Robert F. Shaw
Frank B. Gilbreth Edwin M. Smith
Jack Goldsmith George A. Stauter
Roland Goodman Alfred R: Tapert
William I. Harris Tohn S. Townsend
James H. Inglis n obert D. Townsend
Denton C. Kunze Max H. Weinberg
Powers Moulton Joseph F. Zias

Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
!nmily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoffmeye
eau Levy
Mary McCal

Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosenthal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
r Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

Campus Opinion
Contributors a e asked to he brief,
confining themselxes to -less than 300
words if possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communieants will, however,
be regarded as. confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising............:.. Charles T. Kline
~dvertisir~g..............Thomas M. Davis
Advertising ............William W. Warboys
Service...................Norris J. Johnson
Publication .......,..Robert W. Williamson
Circulation..............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts... ............. Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary.............Mary J. Kenan
Assistants
Thomas V. Hastings Byron V. Vedder
Harry R. Begley Erle Kightlinger
William, Brown Richard Stratemeier
Richard H. Hiller Abe Kirshenbaum
Vernon Bishop Noel D. Turner
William W. Davis Aubrey L. Swinton
E1. Fred Schaefer Wesley C. Geisler
Joseph Gardner Alfred S. Remsen

CAMPUS
To the Editor:

7 -

S AND CREED.

Ann Verner
I)orthea Waterman
Alice McCully
D$orothy 3loomgarden
Dorothy Laylin
Josephine Convisser
Bernice Glaser
Hortense Gooding

Laura Codling
Ethel Constas
Anna Goldberg
Virginia McComb
Joan Wiese
Mary Watts.
Marian Atran
Sylvia Miller

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1930
Night Editor - HAROLD WARREN

TRADE REVIVAL

Following a business depression
which has lasted for more than ten
months, industrial leaders met re-
cently at Chicago and predicted
business on a big scale for the win-
ter and spring of 1930-31. Optim-
ism, such as has not featured any
previous meeting to solve the de-
pression enigma, was the keynote
of the Chicago conference.
Eight outstanding leaders in the
business world discussed the cur-
rent situation in their individual
lines of activity at the conference
held in Mandell hall under the aus-
pices of the Chicago Association of
Commerce and the Commercial and
Industrial clubs of Chicago. The
results were gratifying in the en-
tire sense of the word.
"Just why and how long will the
depression remain?" asked the
men of industry and business at
the Chicago conference. The busi-
ness cycle, which governs econo-
mic trend, tells us that we have hit
the bottom, experts told the con-
vention. Fifty-seven captains of in-
dustry then discussed how thy in-
tended to start the upward trend.
how they intended to disperse the
evils of unemployment, what they
proposed to do to move the rusting
wheels of machinery, unused since
liquidation of the tremendous sur-
plus of 1929 began last spring.
But most significant in the trade
revival congress was the promise
of eight leaders of major industries
to attempt to stem the tide of over-
production when business again
rises to the 1929 levels. The basis
for the recent drop was overproduc-
tion, they said, and it is this over-
production which they intend to
place under control. How they
could do it was the question. And
they answered that it was possible
to forsee the market so that pro-1
duction could be minimized to a
point where liquidation would noi
longer be necessary.
All this, the word of men whot
known their business, cannot bei
taken as merely another attempt tot

I was personally pleased with
your tolerance in printing the
worthy F. W. G. Boesche, Jr's re-
vealing analysis of the condition of
the university convocations. It
served as a long due catharsis to
clear up the Student Christian As-
sociation situation. Heretofore we
have learned of the opinions and
activihies of that organization
through merciful front page re-
porters, but at last we have a fair
sample of the "sweetness and light,"
emanating from that body. The
president has spoken!
The student sage's versatile writ-
ing may be roughly classified as
the former he lightly flits into the
realm of history before his advent
at Michigan and merges triumph-
ant with: "Prior to that time a
tradition seemed to exist to the
effect that to sacrifice the luxury
of one's Sunday's slumbers . . . was
the thing to do . . . . Then, of a
sudden, the rumor squirmed about
thumbs down on Convocations.
Valiantly, they have since struggled
to survive the blight of student dis-
interestedness." Regardless of what
one thinks of Br. Boesche's mind
he must confess that his reasoning
is easy to follow. And to think it all
happened just like that! A nau'ghty
"rumor squirmed about." As an
enthusiastic proselyte of the mas-
ter, (may I, Mr. Bosche?) I sug-
gest that a de-rumorifier be install-
ed as a regular piece of equipment
in Lane Hall, possibly along side of
the famous freshman files, which
alone (in . connection with Mr.
Boesche's "non - denominational"
student worship ideal) make it
possible that a pledge's religious
faith be necessarily stylish with the
fraternity.
Mr. Boesche delves even deeper
into significant causes when he
startles us with: "They simply have
not been able to compete with the
alluring attractiveness of an eve-
ning at the 'Mich' or the 'Maj'."
Please permit my timid suggest-
tion, Mr. Boesche, that the S. C. A.
undertake to educate the students
on the chronology of a Sunday so
that they may be freed from the
satanic shackles of the illusion that
the hours of the theatres and con-
vocations coincide.
Mr. Boesche certaily isn't a,
little man because of a consistencyt
buggaboo. He can say: "The scien-
tific scrutiny which religion has
undergone has only served to
strengthen rather than to weaken'
it.,,
But Mr. Boesche reaches his
climax when he says: "The remedy
to the situation would be the ulti-
mate establishment of a studentl
chapel." Now if I may play prose-
lyte again.--you students, whom
the master says have no interest
in religion, must curb your tend-
ency "to drift with fashions of
thought as well as dress" and taket
interest. Why the master says that
protest to his chapel: "can be over-

ALL
SERIOUSNESS
ASIDE.
Come on now, gents, let's settle
down to some deep, serious thought
on a few timely and important sub-
jects. In the first place, what do
you honestly think about the foot-
ball admission fiesta that Uncle
Harry Tillotson The Time Tested
c Ticket Thief puts on for his boon
companions of a Saturday? My
private opinion is that the Uni-
versity should call out a holiday
on Friday afternoon and let us see
the game first' and then have it
re-played for the benefit of the
alien populace. I, personally, would
just as soon go out a second time
and furnish local atmosphere for
the boys on Saturday if they seem
to demand it. If that plan doesn't
appeal to you, how about writing
a few letters to good old Uncle
Harry and asking him about things.
When it gets to the point where I
am offered the chance to buy a
good ticket from a travelmig sales-
man for ten dollars (an actual oc-
currence) I think it is high time
to do something,-perhaps buy the
ticket. Men of Michigan, defend
your, birthright!
I really think that a good
heart to heart talk (accom-
lished by cuting his heart-if
any-out and giving it a good
talking to) might accomplish
wonders.
** *
Another thing about which I am
in deadly earnest in this matter of
the filled in fanny face on Gar-
goyle. I have had deputations by
the score (37-0, their favor) to tell
me that I was too flippant in my
request , and that if I didn't make
it known that I really meant busi-
ness and had an honest award wait-
ing for each and every one who sent
in a Gargoyle cover with the face
filled in, I'd have to take a free
copy myself. Another thing. The
best one sent in either to me or to
the Gargoyle office will run in the
next issue. (Now I have ruined the
works!)
In conjunction with The
Benevolent Brotherhood For
Kicking The Coeds Off Campus
the Pherret noticed something
the other day that looks very
hopeful for the cause. A lad
over in A. H., being unable'
single' handed to accomplish
the full purpose of the league,
did the next best thing by fol-
lowing an unsuspecting lady-
pardon me - coed. down the
hall until she dropped her
bool. He then, with laudable
vigor, kicked it so far down the
hall that I'll warrant she is
chasing it to this very day.
* * *
I have it on the best of authority
that this young hero is also a mem-
ber of the He Men's Club and The
Fewer Clothes On More Occasions
League. A fine fellow without
doubt.
Dear Dan:
I meant to write you sooner, but
Monday I lost the filling from one
of my teeth and did not find it till
yesterday while looking through
some old dance programs. As it was!

a gold filling, a graduation present
from my father, you can imagine
my relief. I can just see that
chubby little face puckering all up
when you try to. Imagine some
more, Dan, the children seem to
like it.
The other day you broke down in
a gale of print and wondered about
the seal embedded in the main
entrance to the Library. Knowing
that with your lovable laziness,
nothing would ever come of the
probe you contemplated. I took the
matter into my own hands. Initia-
tive . . . . just part of my charm.
The Question - Don't you know
+hat that's a seal you're walking
on?
Bill Hewitt - Sure, but I'm too
tired to run . . . . and how would'
you like a seal in the pan, friend?
Gurney Williams-By George, it
is! And I haven't a fish for either
one of you.
Harry Newman - Pahdon me,
Massa Reportah, ah sure won't do
it again.,
Biddy in a fur coat--Seal?--Sure,r
don t you understand English?
-Yes indeedy, do you speak it?
Just then the whistle on the Bap-t
tist Church rang and I went to
iunch with two other professors..
Always glad to lend a hand, right
across the mouth. you sassv sn ire!il

OLYMPIA
CAST
Prince Plata-Ei e ie ... AI Y AL EN
rehl.. ...-.......... lT nEY I Nlo
Pirincess OlnpiaC.......E!:"t E ii (lAP.
Kovae,..........IAXii'.> IA"io'iU
Cumt Aliert.....s.......IA LLwSIWWER
PrincesIugenie-.......AYIOE
A Review by William J. Gorman.
Comedy Club opened the campus
theatrical season last night with
an interesting production of Ferenc
Molnar's Olympia. It wasn't a con-
pletely jolly evening. The produc-
tion never had enough certainty
for that. There were outstanding
flaws of taste and considerable
difficulties in catching tempos. In
fact, the production had time and
scope enough to go from very bad
in the first act to very good in the
last act.
Only consistent excellence could
make a completely jolly evening
out of Molnar's thi, trivial fable
Democrat. I agree with the Dean
of Hadeliffe about the play.
But despite wavering, the pro-
duction was interesting because
two recognized student talents did
extremely well by themselves and
another one, which had taken a
year's rest, did likewise. These three
performances made the production
a more conspicuous success than
either of Comedy Club's disastrous
appearances last year.
Mary Powers, who did such splen-
did work here this summer, richly
spread1 histrionic butter on her
latest roll (the pun is from Comedy
Club's Credo on the program). Miss
Powers is a very shrewd actress.
Singularly patient with detail,
crowding all possible humour into
her technique, she radiates very
tangible, very fine comedy. Few
students are capable of the com-
pletely unself-conscious vocal and
visual abandonment that is one of
Miss Powers' best comic gifts. Her
temporary return visit was wel-
come indeed.
As a senile courtier, alternating
eloquences with patriotic tears,
Harry Allen gave a thin ripple of
acted humour that made the last
act excellent. Mr. Allen ,with inimit-
able ease does many things at once.
James Raymond's stiff reticence
about bodily movement (as far as
I could make out he moved nothing
but his legs for three acts) suffered
rather badly from the contrast
witm Harry Allen. Frankly, his
Kovacs was probably responsible
for most of the uncertainty in the
production. It was very dry, very
dull, and as I have suggested very
inactive. He was no more interest-
ing inthe scenes of revenge when
he had the upper hand than as
the pleading lover; and his plead-
ing lover in the first act, paying
suit in very finely measured steps
up and down the room, was very
bad. The director can almost be
!feld responsible for this extreme of
preciseness and slowness. Zest
speed, charm, resourcefulness in
the part of Kovacs would have
made the production eminent.
His inadequacy tended to obscure
the fact that Eugenie Chapel (a
prodigy as a freshman and now
fortunately returned to the local
boards) was doing extremely com-
petent work as Olympia. There was
quiet concentration in her approach
to the rather silly part. She was
trying to make it sombre and in-
tense enough to justify our inter-
est. She was continuously showing
enough feeling and enougth desire
for rapid exciting scenes to have
made the whole production sub-

stantial high comedy. Meanwhile
Kovacs was being a very erect, un-
interesting military man with pride
in his heart, Miss Chapel was very
fine.
The outstanding flaw in the pro-
duction was the bad taste some-
where which allowed Whitney Dix-
on to play an Austrian Constable in
Mack Sennet style. Such trifling
humourous parts are common in
Molnar. When correctly and in-
telligently played they are delight-
ful vagaries on the surface of so-
cial comedy. When they are played
farcically in a piping oratorical
voice they let the play down badly.
The only pleasure in the malicious
one of watching thoroughly bad
acting. Again the director seems
to have been careless in permitting
an extreme.
Paul Showers played a minor
part competently, with the princi-

AFTER THE
GAME
STOP AT THE
Sweetland
for
TOASTED SANDWIOHES
and
DINNERS

I

i

UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynard & William
Phone 7515

JAND DR
MIJSICAD DAMJI
TONIGHT: In the Mendelssohn
Theatre Comedy Club repeats its
production of Monar's comedy,
Olympia.

I

[

BROWN-CRESS
& Company, Inc.
INVESTMENT
SSECURITIES
Orders executed on all ex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.c
Telephone 23271
ANN ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
1st FLOOR
.,YY.Yv.,vvv.~v-~v.V.VY-v.Vvv.VY a

LANE HL
The Choicest of Wh
I-

U

hTAVERN
holesome Foods

."

I

( ;i)

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"A VICTOROUS LIFE."

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEY GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 N.-"Comparative Religions."
Sunday school class led by Mrs.
Frederick Fisher.

r[.

1

THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE O0 PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK RLADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS

No evening service-Convocation in
Hill Auditorium.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH.
E. Huron. below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach. Topic:
"THE RECOVERY OF REVER-
ENCE."
12:00 Noon-University Students
Class at Guild House. Mr. Chap-
man.
5:30 P. M.-Hour for social fellow-
ship. Students. gather at Guild
House.
6:30 P. M.-Dr. Frank W. Padel-
ford, of Boston, Executive Secre-
tary of Northern Baptist Board of
Education, will address the stu-
dents.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Celebration in Holy Communion.
11:00 A. M.-Holy Communion in
German.

Complete Line of Everything Musical

6:00 P. M.-Devotional
led by Mr. Paul Russell,
Adjustments."
7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

Meeting
"Making

II

PRIVATE ROOMS FOR BANQUETS AND
DINNER PARTIES
Mrs. Anna Kalmbach

Terms to Suit

i
.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "This Freedom" by Rev.
Alfred Lee Klaer.
12:00-Noon Student Classes.
Religious Values Prof. R. Hoekstra
Ethical Issues in Current Events
........ L. 0. Andrews
Ancient Traditions in the Light of
New Knowledge G. P. Brewington
Introduction to the Bible......
..............Rev. A. L. Klaer
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P.M.-Young People's Meeting.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, October 26
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Is Anything Im-
mortal?"
9:30 A. M.-Church School. Stere-
optican Slides of Palestine."
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship.
6:00 P. M.-Fellowship Supper.
8:00 P. M.-Student Convocation
at Hill Auditorium.

BE CONSISTENT
IN YOUR
RELIGION

! I
.

ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

.7:00 P.
League.

M. - Young

People's

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M,-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel at Harris Hall.)
9:30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock.)
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer..Ser-
mon by Mr. Mann.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall. Address by Mr.
Ernest Piper.
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-German Service.

i'
i

li

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellihorn, Pastor
9:00 and 10:30 A. M.-Regular
Morning Service. Sermon topic:
"The New Man."

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Probation
After Death."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-

III

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