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October 23, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1930

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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AIVAMW

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SOPHOMORE CLASS
TO NAME ABART
COMMITTEE HEADS:
Elections to be Held in League
Theater at 5 O'clock
This Afternoon.
NOMINATE TENTITAVELY
Ethel McCormick, Emily Batest
Will Give Addresses
at Meeting.
Committee heads for the sopho-
more cabaret will be elected this;
afternoon at 5 o'clock in the League
theatre where the sophomore class
will meet. Tentative nominations
for these offices have been submit-
ted by the nominating committee of
the Women's League, but nomina-
tions from the floor will be in order.
The names selected from the
sophomore register by this body are
as follows: general chairman, Bar-
bara Braun and Mary Barnett; as-
sistant chairman, Margaret Keal
and Jane Rayen; chairman of fi-
nance, Jane Feheimer and Rita
Pearl McOmber; chairman of pub-
licity, Margaret O'Brien and ElsieI
Feldman.,
Name Other Nominees. 1
Chairman of entertainment, Vin-1
celle Bartlett and Margaret Scher-
mack; chairman of food, Elizabeth
Eaglesfield and Aileen Clark; chair-
man of decorations, Ann Tobin and
Jean Bentley; chairman of wait-
resses, Betty Clark and Ann Adam;
chairman of costumes, Janet Allen
and Evelyn Neillson.
Miss Ethel McCormick, of the
physical education department, will
address the meeting briefly in ex-
planation of the cabaret, its pur-
pose, and its significance as the
main activity of the sophomore
class. She will preside over the nom-
inations and voting.a
Former Chairman to Speak.I
A talk by Emily Bates, '32, chair-
man of last year's cabaret, will fol-
low. She will describe the cabaret
she managed and tell something of
the work of each committee.l
The League bazaar and the soph-
omore cabaret will be open for two
days in early December, in Barbour
gymnasium. These two projects are
always coincident, the League co-'
operating with the sophomore class
in presenting the cabaret.
The traditional sophomore activi-
ty until last fall was an annual cir-
cus. The class voted last year to
present a cabaret instead, as inter-
est in the former seemed to be dy-
ing out. The marked success of the
first cabaret warranted its adoption
by the class as a regular activity.
Caucusing Is Prohibited.
Caucusing or campaigning for
elections is prohibited by Women's
League rulings. Ruth Van Tuyl, '31,
chairman of the judiciary council,
requests sophomores to observe this
rule in today's elections. Severe
penalties will be imposed on all
women who take part in any poli-
tical activity.

COLOR FORECAST;ON DEFEATS
FAVORS VARIETY

MARGARET HEALY
NAMES CHAIMEN

W. A. A. TRAINS PROMINENT WOMEN
ON CAMPUS, MAINTAINS DR. BELL

I DRAMA SOCIETY

MEETS IN

CAVE

Advance Dispatches Cite Blues,
Greens, for Spring.
Advance dispatches sent out a
few days ago by the Textile Color
Card Association indicated that
the spring colors to be favoredI
are: blues in clear navy and slight-
ly lighter shades, French blues and
tones with a violet cast, beige will
again be popular and will range
from sandy, mauve, and yellow
variations to warm light browns.
Green will remain in vogue, and a'
new almond tone will be shown as
well as the present yellow-green
and blue-green combinations.
Other colors cited by fashion au-
thorites are clear greys in medium
and light shades, and a new inter-
pretation of rose presents itself in
a range of strawberry and rasp-
berry tones, and a red with a bluish
cast.
Accented by notes of white these
animate sport hues will be parti-
larly good: turquoise, sky blue,
straw and butter yellow, jade, bud
green, and a light yellow red.
Officially these colors will not be
shown'until next spring, but it will
be well to keep these hints in mind
when buying an incidental winter
dress so that it may harmonize
with one's spring outfit. Again one
may select colors that are most be-
coming, confident that they will
not be out of style. The most sign-
ificant note seems the favor that
grey, is being accorded, which will
be very smart although its popu-
larity may not be overwhelming.
.WEA THER CHANGEhS
TOURNAMENT-ATEI
First Match in Tourney Played
and Winner Posted on Chart
Friday Afternoon.
Because of weather conditions the
final date for playing off the first.
round of the tennis tournament has
been postponed until Friday after-
noon. The original ruling was that
the match was defaulted if not
played by Monday afternoon but
the deadline has been changed be-
cause it has been too cold, to play.
When the match is finished the
players must post the name of the
winner and the scores on the chart
in the lobby of the Women's Field
House, and these results must be
on the chart by Friday, afternoon or
the contestants will not be consid-
ered in the tournament.
The second round will be under
way after Friday and is to be fin-
ished by Thursday, October 30,

U111 UIVILUfl9 L U

Mosher and Pi Beta Phi

Beat

Cook and Alphi Phi
in Close Games.
HAGEDORN, CRANE STAR
Open play, good defense, and at-
tacking were the features which
marked the hockey game between
Chi Omega and Jordan Hall as the
best played so far this season.
The majorny of the players had
enough knowledge of the game to
display good technique. Alice Crane,
'31, and Hilma Stephens, '31, were
the stars of the Chi Omega team,
and Nell Hagedorn, Grad., and Es-
ther La Rowe, '32, were the players
who were responsible for Jordan's
two goals.
Mosher Hall battled Martha Cook
to a 1 to 0 score. This was a fast
game, but not as open as it would
have been if the teams had had
some practice. Adele Mysen, '31, and
Elizabeth Whitney, '31, starred for
Martha Cook, while Elizabeth Coop-
er, '34, and Roselyn Caley, '32, did
the best playing' for Mosher.
Pi Beta Phi defeated Alpha Phi,
too, in a game in which theinter-
est centered around several players.
Both teams, however, did not reveal
any concerted attack. Pi Phi ex-
celled on the offense, and Alpha Phi
in passing. Betty Healy, '32, and
Maxine Nowak, '32, both in the for-
ward line, led the attack for Alpha
Phi. Dorothy Birdzell, '32, and Helen
Domine, '31, played a great game
for Pi Phi.
The game scheduled between
Kappa Delta and Delta Zeta was
postponed until Monday.
Every year the women of Pur-
due have what is called a "walk-
out" for their freshman girls. This
unique idea, which consists of a
walk to some place in the vicinity
where supper is served, is sponsor-
ed by the Y. W. C. A. It is open
to all, the women on campus and
provides a very agreeable way for
freshman and upperclassmen wo-
men to become acquainted.

Novel Decoration Motif
Feature Pan-Hellenic
Ball This Year.

Will

TICKETS TO BE LIMITED
Margaret Healy, '32, chairman of1
the Pan Hellenic Ball, has chosen,
the chairmen of her various com-
mittees and assigned to each, spe-r
cial activities to be carried out dur-
ing the next few weeks. The Pan-
Hellenic Ball is an annual formal
event, sponsored by the women on1
the campus to which they invite
the men. This year it is to be heldt
Friday, November 28, in the ball-,
room of the Women's League build-
ing.
Jocelyn McLean, '32, was appoint-
ed treasurer of the ball, while Jean
Botsford, '33, has been given charge
of the decorations. It is planned to
carry out a novel motif in the dec-
orations this year, many attractive
plans being under consideration.
The chairman of the chaperone
committee is Eileen Blunt, '33, and
Sarah Francis Orr, '31, is arranging
for the favors. Margaret Thomp-
son, '32, was appointed publicity
chairman.
Dorothy Felske, '32, heads the
music committee, and several well-
known orchestras are being con-
sidered to furnish the music. Doro-
thy Elsworth, '32, is chairman of the
ballroom, while Eugenie Chapel, '32,
is taking care of the tickets. It is
thought advisable for sororities to
send in their orders early as the
number of tickets will necessarily
be limited to the capacity of the,
ballroom. Tickets may be, reserved '
by calling the chairman.
A meeting of the committee
chairmen with Margaret Healy 4,l
be held at 3 o'clock Friday after-
noon in the lounge of the Women's
League building. All chairmen are
asked to be present and be prepared
to select members to work with
them on their committees.

"Most of the original leadershipl
shown by women students on thisl
campus has been the result of
training received from the limitless
projects conducted by the Women's
Athletic Association," said Dr. Mar-
garet Bell, advisor in physical edu-
cation for women, in connection,
with the Membership Campaign be-
ing carried on by W. A. A.
"During the eight years I have
spent here, I've noticed that most of
the women who become outstanding
members of their classes are W. A. A.
women. Since one of the main ob-
jects of education is to develop in-
telligent leaders, the Athletic Asso-
ciation fulfills an important func-
tion," she continued.
"W. A. A. is a society with very
definite ideals," Dr. Bell said. "Its
standard is "Athletics for All," and
it tries to give every member the
opportunity to develop robust health
by participating in some sport."
Dr. Bell stressed the idea that a
certain amount of skill is necessary:
HATS TO MATCH
' AND FITTY

to the enjoyment of any game or
exercise, and that a woman will on-
ly pursue some 'form of outdoor
sport throughout her life when she
enjoys it because she can do it
well.
"A large amount of the difference
in health and appearance between
men of 45 years and women of the
same age can be accounted for by
the fact that men take more physi-
cal exercise than women. Carrying
on an outdoor activity not only con-
tributes to physical and mental
well-being, but it is an important
factor in maintaining a youthful
appearance," she said.
W. A. A. is an organization in
which every Michigan woman stu-
dent is an inactive member. By
earning five W. A. A. points and by
paying the membership fee of one
dollar, any student may become an
active member. The organization is
governed by four officers and an ex-
ecutive board made up of repre-
sentatives from each major and
minor sport.

For the purpose of discussing
this year's plans and programs,
Mummers, campus dramatic so-
ciety, will hold its initial meeting
today at 4:00 o'clock in the Cave
of the Women's League building.
A Christmas play will be present-
ed by the society this year. Other
programs will include talks on re-
cent modern drama given by var-
ious students and faculty members.
STODDARD
BEAUTY
SHOPPE
Have you visited our new
shop?
Call and get our prices on

1I

h.

lIi

III

DON'T MISS
Opening Friday Night
at the MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Call 6300 this Afternoon

III

S

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9

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PERMANENTS
$4 $6 $8
(with service)
Shampoo and Finger
. lave (short hair). . $1.25
M arcel ................75c
Shampoo (short hair). . . 50c
Thinning or Trimming. .50c
RAGGEDY ANN
BEAUTY SHOP
1110 S. University Dial 7561

i

Choose an ELECTROCHEF* electric
range and receive this cooking
set without extra charge!

NOTICE
The Central Committee of the
Junior Girl's Play will meet at
3 o'clock this afternoon in the
undergraduate office of the
League building.

9

iii

ii

MUMS
AND
POMPONS
FOR THE WEEK-END PARTY
Order a Corsage or Mum for the game at
FLOWER DAY'S

A7-piece set of heavy-
duty Mirro-aluminum
cooking utensils, special-
ly designed for high effi-
ciency, is included with
installed in the homes of
is a set that any woman

every ELECTROCHEF electric range
Detroit Edison customers. This

609 East William

Phone 7014

-a

would delight to have in the kitchen. The utensils are con-
structed with black heat-absorbing surfaces for high-speed
cooking: Cooking is one-
third faster, and the amount
of electricity needed for a
cooking operation is greatly
reduced.
See the ELECTROCHEF at any
Detroit Edison office. Its cash
price installed is -$105, with1-
all necessary wiring. Down
payment $10, balance $6 a
mor:h, Sales under these
conditions made to "Detroit
Edison customers only.='

(

Complete Line of Everything Musical
THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Olt PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK RADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

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