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October 19, 1930 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-19

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mpAGEFQOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1930

Published every morning except Monday
Suring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in thie paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan,easgsecond class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 22214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
SMANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor ...............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director...........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor........... .. Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor.......Mary L. Behymer
Music andDrama..........William J. Gorman
Assistant News Editor.....Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor. I eorge A. Stauter
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S.Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold O. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Wilbur J. Myers
Ir~ving J. Blumberg Robert L. Pierce
Donald 0,Boudeman Sher M. Qurashi
George T. Callison C. Richard Racine
Thomas M. Cooley Jerry E. Rosenthai
George Fisk George Rubenstein
Yernard W. Freund (barley A. Sanford
Morton Frank Marl Seiffert
Saul Friedberg Robert F. Sbaw
Frank B. Gilbreth Edwin M. Smith
Jack Goldsmith George A. Stauter
Rolan dGoodman Alfred R. Tapert
William H. Harris Tobn S. Townsend
James H. Inglis 1obert D. Townsend
Denton C. Kunze Max H. Weinberg
Powers Moulton Joseph F. Zias

Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Pmily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoff meyi
j ean Levy
orothy Magee
Mary McCall

Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean' Rosenthal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
er Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Tihopson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising.................Charles T. Kline
Advertising ............. Thomas M. Davis
Advertising ............Willam XW. Warboys
Service ................... Norris . Johnson
Publication............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation..............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accouns...................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary ............Mary . genan
Assistants
Thomas E. Hastings Byron V. Vedder
Harry R. Begley Erle Kightlinger
William Brown Richard Stratemeier
Richard H. Hiller Abe Kirshenbaum
Vernon Bishop Noel D. Turner
William W. Davis Aubrey L. Swinton
R. Fred Schaefer Wesley C. Geisler
Joseph Gardner Alfred S. Remsen
Ann Verner Laura Codling
northea Waterman Ethel Constas
Alice MCully Anna Goldberg
Dorothy Blooingarden Virginia McComb
Dorothy Laylin Joan Wiese
osephine Convisser Mary Watts
erAice Glaser Marian Atran
Hortense Gooding Sylvia Miller
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1930
Night Editor-RICHARD L. TOBIN
THE HARVARD OF THE WEST
Following the Purdue-Michigan
football game, a writer on the "Ex-
ponent", daily university paper at
Lafayette, told of his impressions
of Michigan and Ann Arbor in a
feature article which appeared on
the day after the game. He called
Michigan the "Harvard of the west"
and was quite shocked with the
eastern atmosphere which he found
at the University.
"They have," he said, "a peppy,
semi-sophisticate body of stud-
ents, professing to be attending the
Harvard of the Middle-west. Dress-
ed about as many college students
are dressed, they assume a calm in-
difference which they believe in
keeping with the Harvard idea."
We are glad to hear that some-
one realizes that Michigan isn't,
after all, a tydical rah-rah middle-
western university with "frats"
and close-cropped hair and Harold
Teen clothes. We pride ourselves
on being ourselves, and not the col-
lege type which pervades many of
our contemporary middle-western
institutions who seem to think that
they must act like collegiate movie
actors in order to be distinguished
from those who don't go away to
college.
But why did Michigan give the
Exponent's feature writer an im-
pression of borrowed Harvardism?
There are several reasons. Perhaps
he saw at Michigana quieter, less
high-schoolish sort than he had
seen before. Perhaps he realized
that here, at least, other things
than football and big stadia count
for something. It is possible that
he saw a more conservative eastern
group of students mixed pleasantly
with a mid-western jollity than
any other group he ever met. Per-
haps he was impressed by the
"haphazard manner of the campus
buildings" which he described so
accurately in the Exponent.
Michigan isn't the Harvard of
the west by any means. Michigan
is just eastern enough, however, to

but it doesn't take long to combine
t h e s e qualities into something
which even other Big Ten universi-
ties notice as unique.
The Exponent is right, after all.
We ARE the Harvard of the middle-
west because we're part eastern
and part western and the result
is a very pleasant combination. The
Exponent, whether it knew it or1
not, gave Michigan quite a compi-i
ment the other day.t
THE HONOR SYSTEM3
Perhaps many of the students of
the University are wondering what
happened to the proposed honor
system for the literary college, fol-
lowing the vote taken on the sub-t
ject last spring. The balloting onf
the question, arbitrarily made an
issue in the All-campus elections,
was to determine the amount of
sentiment favoring or disaproving
its adoption in the literary college.
A committee, composed of repre-;
sentatives from the Student coun-
cil, supervising the elections, and
certain faculty men interested in;
the question, was to draw up a plan
and submit it to the Administrative
board for approval, in the event
the theory of the honor system was
favored.
Although the idea was approved
by a four to one vote by those vot-
ing on the subject, we congratulate
the council for shelving the ques-
tion, which at best, could not be
very successful, and treating it as
a dead issue.
Granting the existing evils under
the proctor system and the need for
improvement and reform of pres-
ent conditions, we feel that an
honor plan would prove a miserable
failure if attempted in the literary
college. It has neither aroused the
students in its favor nor has it re-
ceived a representative view-point
of the literary undergraduates,
since only one-fifth of the school
participated in the elections last
spring. The number of votes which
repudiated the theory of the sys-
tem, together with the proportion-
ate increase which would result
from the total enrollment, fur-
nishes conclusive proof that the
purpose of such a plan if at-
tempted would be defeated.
Supporters of the system, includ-
ing many prominent faculty men
who enthusiastically and sincerely
favor the plan, point to the success
it has enjoyed in the engineering
college, when advocating its adop-
tion for the literary college. Such
a viewpoint does not consider the
wide variance in the component
parts of the relative schools, not
the size of enrollments in each. For
the most part the students of the
former are in college for a definite
purpose hence are more serious in
their scholastic outlook than is the
average undergraduate in the lit-
erary school.
Unless some plan which gathers
its impetus from the student body
itself, and not through forced or
unnatural development by a cam-
pus organization, is devised to sat-
isfactorily meet the needs of the
literary colege, we feel that the
question of the honor system should
be a thing of the past.
INSPECTION BARRIERS
At the June reunions held last
summer, many alumni were heard
to complain that among the newer
buildings upon the campus which
they had wanted to inspect, the In-
tramural Building was the only one

they were not able to gain acess to
Although assured that it would be
open for their convenience, it was
constantly locked up because "the
care-taker wasn't around - at the
ball game or someplace."
Next week-end Michigan will wel-
come thousands of alumni for the
annual homecoming game. Many of'
them come from Detroit, and are in
constant touch with the campus.
But by far the majority come from
points distantly located, and this is
their one chance of the year to re-
new old friendships, and to become'
acquainted with the latest develop-
ments in the line of new buildings
and policies of the University.
Michigan alumni are, and always
h a v e been,tan extremely loyal
group, interested in their a 1 m a
mater and eager to help work with
the faculty and students, a distinc-
tion of which few other schools may
boast. Friday" and Saturday of this
week will be the time for the stu-
dents and faculty to welcome them
back to the campus and entertain
them during their stay. We sin-
cerely hope that every effort will
be made to make their stay here as
pleasant as possible, so that they
will go home with a feeling that
they are really welcome on the#
camnus. several years after their?

0ASTD pp L
x; KEEP
THE SEAL
(By Disassociated Mess.)
ANN ARBOR, October 19. - The
Rolls Vigilance Committee, consist-
ing of Elmer Gantry and Dan Bax-
ter, today opened a vigorous cam-
paign to keep students from walk-
ing on the library seal. A recom-
mendation to President Ruthven
was drawn up to rope off the seal
and post guards around. Both
members of the Board stated that
a sub-committee would standton
the seal all day long to keep stud-
ents from stepping on it. (On the
seal, you poor fish.) An extra bulle-'
tin will be issued at a later date.
* * =
Yes, boys and girls, that is the
story that was given a nine column
210-point headline in the New
York Times yesterday. WE ARE
OUT TO WIN this year. I must
apologize for Dan's statements'
yesterday, but he hadn't drawn up
the report yet, so he merely tem-
porized by printing libel and un-
truth about yours truly.
BEWARE
This constitutes a warning
to those who insist on violat-
ing the Rolls rule that students
should walk around the library
seal. Tomorrow afternoon the
Vigilance will be posted (X
marks the spot) and interview
-all persons who walk on the
seal, in an effort to determine
a remedy for this nefarious
practice. (Incidentally I hope
that those interviewed will have
quicker come-backs than those
we talked with last year. We
had to make up all the funny
answers. After all, we have to
fill the column.)
Dear Elmer:
I am disappointed. Didn't you
notice in Thursday's Daily that the
Hut suggests for dinner tonite-
seventy-five cents? I suppose for
zoup.
L.

COMEDY IN THE NOVEL
CONFESSIONS OF ZENO: byItalo
Svevo: published by Alfred Knopf,
$3.00.
----
A Review
Scott Buhanan has defined the
logical genesis of comic forms as
a matter of the burlesque of serious
intellectual patterns. "Some formal
pattern is invented, such as Greek
tragedy, and a great deal of ima-
gination and thought is poured
into the mold. It becomes classic.
rhen a substitution is madegwhich
xplosively breaks through the
form. The Greek satyr play and
comedy illustrate the result. New
wine is poured into old bottles and
there is laughter when the bottles
break."
This theoretic definition admir-
ably explains the world-wide suc-
cess that the novel of a successful
Trieste merchant (encouraged to
writing by James Joyce) has won.
The most subtly worked creation of
this generation has been the novel
of introspection, the novel based on
an assumption of the inadequacy
of the spoken word or the event to
communicate the complexity of a
character's feeling. Undoubtedly in-
fluenced by the appearance and
prominence of psychoanalysis, no-
velists came to be worried about
the depth and width of the 'soul
under the surface.' The stream-of-
consciousness was a technical re-
flection of this interest. This tend-
ency found critical statement in
various essays of Virginia Woolf.
It has found its creative realiza-
tion inlthe work of the best writers
of the day: in Mrs. Woolf, James
Joyce, and in Proust. Despite the
differences, there is an intellectual
pattern common to,their work. In
their judgment of the interest of
one of two worlds, or one of two
ways to live, they all agree.
"Confessions of Zeno" explodes
this intellectual pattern. "It is a
substitution w h i c h explosively
breaks through this form." Super-
ficially, Svevo's novel is a burlesque
of psychoanalysis. Actually it is
a comic exploitation of the intro-
spective form in the novel, which
has been the hard creative work
of a generation of artists. The re-
sult is comedy. So great comedy
that, despite the clumsiness in the
autobiographical technique, it is
undoubtedly a novel of perman-
ence.
Zeno, a rich, lazy clown with a
sense of irony and a diseased habit
of self-analysis and self-justifica-
tion, is plunged into a world of
grotesque events. His father, dying,
arises from his bed, vigorously
slaps Zeno's face, returns to bed
and dies. Zeno, during a seance,
proposes to each one of three sis-
ters, beginning with the loveliest;
the ugliest accepts.
Such events take place because
Zeno is consistently and outrage-
ously maladjusted. A neurotic. Ah,
but a happy neurotic. Happy be-
cause busy analyzing his com-
plexes. All sensible decision and
action is stifled by the length of
time it takes Zeno's mind to reach
psychoanalytic platitudes. B u t
meanwhile he has ben enjoying the
process. When there is no event to
create a maelstrom in his sensi-
bility, Zeno indulges in introspec-
tion merely as compensation for
the dullness of life.
There is no crude malice in
Svevo's drawing of this character.
Indeed it is caricature by an artist
who enjoys his work. Svevo seems

to take considerable delight in his
personal capacity for psychological
insight: a quality which Zeno re-
flects. The character proves to be a
profoundly comic conception: an
adequate object or focus for all the
rich variety of Svevo's mind.
JACQUES MARITAIN
A Note

I About Books

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ENTERTAINMENT OF THE YEAR

SIX OF THE WORLD'S MOST
NOTED FIGURES OF TODAY
ADMIRAL
Richard E. Byrd
"Conqueror of the North and South Pole"
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1930
William Hard

University ofC
yOratorical Association
THE OUTSTANDING UNIVERSITY

;i.

"Foremost Washington Correspondent"
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1930

** *
Well 'ell, you see it's this way.
We were invited out Thursday and
didn't have to pay for our meal.
For your vigilance you are awarded
a copper-plated rumble seat, with
Chinese handles and a pair of
braces.
* * *
Willie writes in and suggests a
Klean-the-Kampus week, to be de-
voted to -picking up stray co-eds,
babies, and cigarette butts and de-
posit them in the receptacles pro-
vided for such rubbish by the B
& G boys. The first article fits in
nicely with our Michigan-for-Men
campaign, Willie, but at present
the wear-corduroy-pants-and-go-
around-in-shirtsleeves campaign is
taking up a great deal of our time,
especially since the sun came out
yesterday. We'll take up the sug-
gestion later.
* * *
Dear Elmer:
What is to be done about the
B. M. O. C. whose footsteps have
been seen lately on the campus
lately? I'll bet he has all the
fickle gabs (typographical er-
ror) saying-"Oh how divinely,
supinely tall!?!" He is really a
big man. His stride measures
about 15 feet, which would put
his eyes about level with the
top floor of Mosher Hall!
(What a break - Elmer.) He
should be reported to the Flint
State-cops-corps-copse - corpse
or the R. O. T. C., or some other
similar benevolent association.
Profusely Yours
Willie Ross.
o *.*
I Willie, your patriotic self-sacri-
flee is commendable. But we al-
ready put the B & G boys *vise to
the situation, and they are combing
out Mosher-Jordan right now. We
suspect that he is hiding in the
tar barrels around alumni mem-
orial hall in order to save money
on chewing gum. But you win the
b o y - scout-patrol-leader-be-pre-
pared award for the week.
* *. * .
Somebody sent in a letter with
what they thought was the long-
est word in the woild. We offer
antidisestablishmentarianistically.
* * C
BULLETIN

Carveth

Wells,

Env
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,
,

"The Man

Who Makes Facts Fascinating
.Truth Sound Like a Lie"

and the

THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1931
Grand Duchess Marie
OF RUSSIA

"Second Cousin to King George of England"
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1931
CO UNT

. .,7- 1

Felix

Von Luckner

Longmans, Green and Co. have
announced for publication Jacqlus
Maritain's first book "An Introduc-
tion to Philosophy." This is Mari-
tin's third book to be translated:
the other three being Three Re-
formers, Prayer and Intelligence,
Art and Scholasticism.
T. S. Eliot has called Maritainj
"the most conspicuous figure and
probably the most powerful force in
contemporary French philosophy."
Maritain's has been the leader of
the Neo-Thomist movement in
France. The novelty of his position
has been his refusal to think of
Thomism as an escape from the
modern worlds and its problems.
He does not think of himself as

i

"The Famous Sea-Devil and Germany's Outstanding
Hero"
TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 1931
Gilbnadsert K ChLestertr GonnLs
"England's Supreme literary Genius"

I;

DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED

Y }r '

Elmer:
Saw a fellow come out of the
main library when it was raining.
He deliberately took off the slicker
he had on and put it around the

RESERVED SEATS FOR ENTIRE SERIES

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