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October 18, 1930 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-18

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IDa- FOUR
Published every morning except Monday
luring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
inthie paper and the local news published
herein.-
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Ofices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 212r4.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editork..............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director-,.........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor--------------..Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor--........-Mary L. Behymer
Music and Drama ....... WilliamJ. Gornan
Assistant News Editor....Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor George A. Stauter
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol HarolddO. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Wilbur J. Myers
Irving 3. Blumberg Robert L. Pierce
Donald O .Boudeman Sher M. Quraishi
George T. Callison C. Richard Racine
rhomas M. Cooley Jerry E. Rosenthai
George Fisk George Rubenstein
!Aernard W. Freund Charles A. Sanford
Morton Frank Karl Seiffert
Saul Friedberg Robert F. Shaw
Frank B Gilbreth Edwin M. Smith
Jack Goldsmith George A. Stauter
Roland Goodman Alfred R. Tapert
William H. Harris Tohn S. Townsend
James H. Inglis Robert D. Townsend
Denton C. Kunze Max Ii. Weinberg
Powers Moulton Joseph F. Zias

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY'

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1930

Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Nmily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoffmeye
jean Levy
Dorothy Magee
Mary McCall

Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosenthal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
r Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
i BUSINESSnMANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising ................Charles T. Kline
Advertisir.?------.- -----homas M. Davis
Advertising............'William W. Warboys
Service...-................Norris J. Johnson
Publication------------R[obert W. Williamson
Circulation.............RMarvin S. Kobacker
Accounts-.....--....-......Thomas S. Aluir
Business Secretary...........Mary J. enan
Assistants
Thomas E. Hastings Byron V. Vedder
Harry R. Begley Erle Kightlinger
William Brown Richard Stratmeier
Richard H. Hiller Abe Kirshenbaum
Vernon Bishop Noel D. Turner
William W. Davis Aubrey L. Swinton
EL Fred Schaefer Wesley C. Geisler
Joseph Gardner Alfred S. Remsen
Ann Verner Laura Codling
Dorthea Waterman Ethel Constas
Alice McCully Anna Goldberg.
Dorothy Bloomgarden Virginia McComb
Dorothy Laylin Joan Wiese
Josephine Convisser Mary Watts
Bernice Glaser Marian Atran
Hortense Gooding Sylvia Miller
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1930
Night Editor-BEACH CONGER, Jr.
SUPPORT FOR THE LAWLESS
The recent scandals which have
been coming to light in the investi-
gation of magistrates' courts in
New York City are a fitting com-
mentary on the state of law en-
forcement throughout the country
It is common knowledge that the
upholding of law is in the hands,
to a disconcerting degree, of men
who are open to every sort of a
bribe, whether of money or of pow-
er. It is also well known that law
enforcement-is in the hands of po-
lice and judges who fail at almost
every point to observe the laws
they are placed in office to uphold.
The report of a committee ap-
pointed to look into the lawless en-
forcement of the law has just sub-
mittedaitsreport to the American
B a r association. This statement
scathingly indicts the methods now
in. use for the arrest and detention
of prisoners before trial. It contends
first that the "third degree" in the
sense of rigid and severe examina-
tion of men under arrest by police
officers or prosecuting attorneys or
both is in use almost everywhere in
the United States. Chicago's meth-
od of wholesale arrest on suspicion
is prevalent enough in other parts
of the country, and is without justi-
fication in law. Entry and search of
dWellings without warrant is equal-
ly common, as is holding of prison-
ers without charge and without
permission to see counsel or friends
-usually while some form of the
third degree is practiced. By law,
the prisoner is to be brought before
a court without unnecessary delay;
while he is held,the accused is pre-
sumed. innocent and entitled to'
counsel and to humane and decent
treatment. But this is not the prac-
tice.
Toleration in police circles of the
third degree and of holding prison-'
ers incomunicado is attributable to;
the difficulties of enforcing lawI
among a people of extreme hetero-
geneity, with no fixed abode, witht
no system of registration or identi-
fication, in an enormous geographi-
cal area. The spirit of the frontier,
with its lvnch iw and hysteria. still

of all, the average police officer is
convinced that if he does not bring
his prisoner in with a complete con-
fession, the prisoner will s l i p
through the wide open meshes of
the courts. Court procedure is slow
and careless; judges are not incor-
ruptible; court clerks are notorious-
ly susceptible to influence'."
The committee's findings reach
the heart of the matter when it is
pointed out that public opinion is
indifferent to laxity and corruption
in the courts and actually approves
of police violence, provided culprits
are found for the more spectacular
crimes. This lack of a public spirit-
ed body of opinion and unholy
wrath on the part of private citi-
zens silently condones the corrupt
actions now in vogue. In fact, the
committee points out cases in which
the citizenry protests against refor-
mation. "A few months ago," states
the report, "policemen in a certain
city made two egregious blunders in
breaking into houses without war-
rants.... .Then the police commis-
sioners made an order that the offi-
cers obtain search warrants before
breaking into dwellings. Whereupon
a large and potent factor of the
public at once urges the revocation
of the order."
There is little ground for optim-
ism in the current forecast. When
the ordinary citizen refuses illumi-
nation or, more generally, calls for
wholesale disregard for the law on
the part of those detailed to uphold
it, only the more optimistically-
minded can hope for an incorrupti-
ble police and judiciary.
"FIGHTING BAND"
A vague feeling of inappropriate-
ness comes over us when we hear
that well known phrase, "Michigan's
fighting band." Those scrupulously
pressed uniforms, those w h i t e
starched shoulder straps and espe-
cially those stiff, precisely drawn
ranks that strut down the field in
well ordered columns seem to sug-
gest the parade ground of a military
school rather than a battle field. Is
the true fighting spirit1'of Michigan
represented by that spectacle of
haughty militarism? We also call
attention to the two heralds one of
whom marches at each end of the
front rank. Do not these medieval
figures. with their gay yellow M
banners attached to the bottoms of
their trumpets suggest the spirit of
a comic opera or perhaps a Holly-
wood version of the court life in
Luxemburg?
We admit that the music pro-
duced is excellent, the drills exe-
cuted are perfection, but somehow
the whole tone of the performance
is theatrical, suggests the profes-
sional musician rather than the en-
thusiastic, spontaneous college by.
Comments on our band usually
are comparisons, favorable or un-
favorable, with other bands of mid-
western colleges.
In fairness to the industrious ef-
fort of the band, which after all
shows a great deal of college loyalty,
it must be said that the drills and
formations of the band stack up
very favorably with other similar
organizations in other colleges. The
initiative and effort expended in
obtaining the new uniforms that
have made their first appearance
this year, must also be commended
for its own sake, if not for the end
achieved. The point we want to
make is that the stiff, parade ground
attitude vith all the theatrical
props that the manager can muster
defeats the real purpose of the band
which is to represent down on the
field the spirit and feeling of the

undergraduate body.
For a spontaneous, lively, rough
and ready appearing outfit take the
Harvard band we saw here last fall.
White duck trousers and red sweat-
ers, a lively and untutored step and
lots of noise. That should express
the Michigan spirit of rough and
ready fearlessness better than our
own Gawdy Pageantry.
Campus Opinion
Contributors aie asked to be brief,
;oifining themnselx (s to Less than 300
SordIs if possible .ionymous eom
munications xil lbe disregarded. The
names of coimni icart s xwill, however,
he regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters publisied should not ibe
constriued as expressing tlie editorial
opinion of The Daily.
To the Editor:
Michigan students should note
with approval the views of Bill
Roper which were expressed in a
recent Associated Press dispatch
and elucidated in yesterday's Daily.
The strong tendency of men on the
campus to engage in intramural
sports or in athletic competition as
members of the minor sports teams
is a healthy indication that civil-
ized and normal persons have sensi-
ble views toward the place of ath-
letics in the college.
The encouragament which this
tendency receives through the pro-

1/
APOLOGIZE

'fiMUSICA R

WE RENT
WE SERVICE Radios
WE SELL
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP

I

Tel. 2.2812

MUSICAL CRITICISM.

615 E. William)

It wasn't really my fault about
that column yesterday, fellows. I
was away at the time and someone
sneaked up and planted that one
on me. The worst of it all is that I
am away again now, and the
chances are that the same thing
will happen tomorrow. However, I
ought to be just overflowing with
witicisms after a visit to the Ohio
stronghold.
* * *
Last time I went down there
and watched Andy chasing the
fellows around on his bicycle
without having the slightestj
idea whether they were Ohio
or Michigan students (he was
in no condition to tell by the
licenses) and I came back feel-i
ing so funny that even the dis-
covery of the fact that Andy
really didrecognize me was not
sufficient to tone down my high
spirits.
* * *
Such times as these, however,
serve to prove the ingenuity of the
Michigan man. I am reminded of
the gent last year who went down
on the tender of the Special loco-
motive, went in as a manager, and
came home in the pants of one of
the bandsters on the Special again.
Bumming is one of the more
popular ways for the impecun-
ious to get there. I went to
Minnesota that way last year,
arriving in Chicago just in time
to see the crowds leaving the
stands at the end of the Notre
Dame-Army game. Needless to
state, I went no further and
fared no worse, but it was a
nice trip just the same. I got to
ride with a bootlegger in a
Packard and everything.
* * *
Speaking of bums, I wish to in-
form Grandma Whoofle that if she
wants to know what my idea of
privacy is, all she has to do is
come around and I'll show her, but
I'll tell her one thing first, and that
is that it isn't the telephone booth
in the Parrot. Neither is it the
Michigan Daily office, he said,
flicking off seven kibbitzers which
had settled on his left shoulder.
* * *
Right now, I wish to offer
one last prize, and if no one
applies for this, I'll just quit
offering p r i z e s, and then
where'll you be? The last prize
is a Rolls Diploma for One eyed-
connellyism, and will be award-
ed to the man, woman, or beast
who sends in the most original
and feasible not to mention
amusing method of getting to
out of town games. The method
must be tried and successful to
qualify.
* * *
I certainly hope all you men are
satisfied now that you have gotten
your university a reputation for
fostering a gang of tea-hounds,
I've been prophesying this for some
time, and nobody can say that I
haven't done my best to get you
out of your evil ways. Come on
now, how about listening to the
call of the He Men's Club? Join the
Coatless-Shirt League, the Cordu-
roy Pants league, the Shoving-the-
Coeds-off-of-Sidewalks-and-M a k-
i n g - them-Walk-in-the-Street-
League. Let us eschew ... get that?
. . eschew (boy, a few more of those
and I'm going out and write an
editorial) as I was saying,-let us
eschew this effeminacy that is
making us the laughingstock of the
conference and come once more

into our own among the men of
the world.
* * *
Does anyone know what the can-
vass was doing up in front of the
Union not long since? First they
pulled up a lot of old rope, and
then there was a long wait during
which, I suppose, the boys were
ravelling it and spinning the can-
vass up on the roof, and then they
lowered the sheet down over the
tower's face with a great deal of
shooshing and mystery. I want to
know all about this, and that right
soon.
Elmer wants to have me tell
you that it was all a big mis-
take. There isn't anything in
here to watch for. He meant to
have you watch Sunday's paper.
He thinks he is going to start a
crusade or something, and is
very anxious that you read all
about it. Elmer is, however,
such an untruthful lad that
you can't ever rely on his state-
ments. I remember distinctly

In the current issue of the Hound
and Horn, America's best critical
quarterly, there is an article Some
Problems of Musical Criticism by
Herbert S. Schwartz, '29. This
paper, which is the first of a series
of articles to appear in the Hound
and Horn and to be later published
in book form by Alfred A. Knopf,
was begun on the campus in the
rhetoric seminar in criticism form-
erly conducted by Peter M. Jack.
Mr. Schwartz was also connected
with this column for a year and
a half as a music reviewer.j
The present article, which has
already received New York notices
as "one of the most significant
contributions to musical aesthetics
in recent years," is concerned with
the clarification of the nature of
music's "meaning" and with indi-
cation of a program of principles to
guide one's critical approach to
music.
In his "Principles of Literary
Criticism," I. A. Richards, admit-
tedly feeble himself in his treat-
ment of musical problems, gave an
accurate description of the "im-
passe" in, musical criticism. Mr.
Schwartz seems capable of indicat-
ing the way out. The brilliance of
his first article suggests very
strongly that his book will be able
to do for musical criticism what
Mr. Richards has done for literary
criticism.
A MONTH IN THE COUNTRY.
The New York Theatre Guild
brings the second play in its De-
troit season to the Wilson Theatre
Monday night for a week's run. The
play is Turgeniev's "A Month In
The Country." It is a quiet, leisure-
ly drama by a novelist, a pastoral
discursion into the relaxed graces
of living in the country. Sensitive
provincials while the time away,
lolling in chairs and drinking tea
in a manner that was to become
a formula- in Chekhov.
Under this surface relaxation
there is a drama of the complexi-
ties in love, which Turgeniev treats
tragi-comically. The material some-
what pallidly suggests Strange In-
terlude. Natalie Petrovna distri-
butes her affections generously.
She has her husband. And is
granted chaste adulation from her
husband's friend, who reads to her.
She gets tangled slightly with the
young tutor in the household,
whom her ward loves. The two
women dissemble humorously until
some sort of a climax seems im-
minent. Then the two superflous
men wander away, their month in
the country over.
The Theatre Guild's production
of this famous Russian drama,
under the -direction of Rouben
Mammoulian, is said to be one of
the most competent in the history
of that organization. In the first
place, they were lucky enough to
secure the services of Alla Nazi-
mova, whose return .to the stage
created a sensation. Raymond
Sovey, young designer for the
Guild, was sent to Russia to copy
the original sets done by a famous
Russian painter-friend of Turgen-
iev's. Then the production contains
almost the cream of the Guild's
permanent group of actors: Dudley
Digges as a country doctor, Henry
Travers as a bumpkin suitor, Alex-
ander Kirkland as the young tutor,
and Eliot Cabot.
CLARE CLAIRBERT.
Clare Clairbert, celebrated Bel-
gian soprano, who is to appear as

the second artist in the Choral
Union series has announced the

NOTICE!
Quality tailoring in custom made
clothes. All the new Fall shades.
$35 to $40
CHAS. DOUKAS
1319 South University
-'P..-

BROWN-CRESS
& Company, Inc.
INVESTMENT
SECURITIES
Orders executed on all ex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.
Telephone 23271
ANN ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
1st FLOOR

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but if purity, wholesomeness and
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other Ann Arbor families and have
Ann Arbor Dairy Golden Jersey
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Ann Arbor Dairy Co.
The Home of Pure Milk
Dial 4101

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16,

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"WHAT JESUS MEANS TO
ME."
Dr. Fisher
(Broadcast over Station WWJ)
7:30 P.M.-Evening Worship.
"A MESSAGE TO A TROUBLED
WORLD."
Bishop Ernest V. Shayler of the
Episcopal Church, Nebraska.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.--The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship. Mr.
Chapman will speak on "THE
PASSION PLAY."
12:00 N.-University Students Class
at Guild House (503 F. Huron).
5:30 P. M.-Friendship and social
time for all students.
6:30 P. M.-Devotional period. J.
Perry Austin, '31 will speak on
"Science in Search for Truth."
Discussion invited.
The Guild House, 503 E. Huron,
is University Students social cen-
ter.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Ei.angelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
William
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Acquaintance with
God."
11:00 A. M.-German Service.

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEY GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 N.-"Comparative Religions."
Sunday school class led by Mrs.
Frederick Fisher.

11

6:00 P. M.-Devotional
led by Mr. Paul Russell,
Adjustments."
7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

Meeting
"Making

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Afraid of High Places."
12 to 12:45-Noon Student Classes.
Religious Values Prof. R. Hoekstra
Ethical Issues in Current Events
.............. ...L. 0. Andrews
Ancient Traditions in the Light of
New Knowledge G. P. Brewington
Introduction to the Bible...
... . .. . .Rev. A. L. Klaer
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P.M.-Young People's Meeting.
Leader: G. P. Brewington of the
Physics Department.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, October 19, 1930

i

BE CONSISTENT
IN YOUR
RELIGION
ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

10:45 A. M.-Morning
Sermon topic: "What Is
of Prayer?"

Worship.
the Good

11

9:30 A. M.-Church School.
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship,
6:30 P. M.-Mr. Philip. Bursley will
speaker on "The Mutual Obliga-
tions of the Student and the Uni-
versity."

KARL MARX AND JESUS
CHRIST
What is the relationship between the
church and the labor movement?
Ben F. Wilson of Erie, Penn. has
been both a preacher and a work-
er in the ranks of labor.
He will talk to the Liberal Students'
Union, Sunday evening at 7:30 on
the subject "Personal Observations
of the British Labor Movement."

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall).
9:30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin.
dergarten at II o'clock.)
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer; ser-
mon by Mr. Lewis.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall. Address by Profes-
sor Morris P. Tilley.

following program:
L'Enlevement au Serail
Mme. Clairbert

MozartI

Allegro Appassionato St. Saens
Mr. deBourguignon (pianist)
Serenade Brumagne
Chanson Triste DuParc
Mandoline deBourguignon
Mme. Clairbert

7:00 P.
League.

M' - Young People's

In the Library
Church, State

of the Unitarian
and Huron Sts.

Polonaise et Badinerie
Mr. Lion (flautist)
Caro Mio ben c
Russian Nightingale
Mme. Clairbert
Spanish Dance No. 5 G
Sequidillas
Mr. deBourguignon

Bach
Giordoni
Alabieff
xranatos
Albeniz
Verdi

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellihorn, Pastor
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning
Service. Sermon topic: "Spiritual
Wealth."
4:30 P. M--Student Bible Class.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.

t'

10:30 A.
Service.
TRINE

M.-R e g ular Morning
Sermon topic: "DOC-
OF ATONEMENT."

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
9:00 A. M,-German Service.
10:00 A. M.---Bible School.
11:00 A. M.-English Worship. Ser-
mon: "HOW FAITH IS PRO-
DUCED."
2:30 P. M.-Student Club Outing.
Leave from Church. There will be
no meeting at the church in the

5:30 P. M.-Student
Supper.

Fellowship nd

11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening
testimonial meeting.
The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building, is open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, except

La Traviata
Mmze. Clairbert

6:30 P. M.-Student Forum. Dis-
cussion on "An Evening with the

OLYMPIA.

III

HI 11

11 11

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