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October 17, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SAGFr TWO

THE MICHIGAN

IbATLLI

FRIDAY, OCTOB7 1,10 0

N DES ADDRESSES,
0 PfLAHEXPLIOITS
Speaks on 'The Value of Present
Day Exploration to
Civilization.'
ITSCUSSES ; POLAR TRIP
States That Michigan Has Done
Mach Toward Sponsoring
'Geclogical Trips.
,Stating that the :University of
Michigan had been the mother to
a large number of valuable expedi-
tiuns, Prof. William H. Hobbs, of
the geology department, spoke be-
fore the first All-Campus forum of
the year yesterday afternoon in
efioeiaia'hall, upon the subj ect,
"The value of Present Day Explor-
ation 'to Civilization.""
Praises Michigan.
Michigan, Professer Hobbs stated,
has sent the late Professor Kelsey,
and now Waterman, to the near
east to discover remnants of an
artient ci lization in the valley of
the Tigtis and Euphrates in Meso-
potamia. It has sent Professor
Hobbs himself to Greenland to
study the air currents over the
great Greenland ice cap. Several
decades ago it sent Professor
Sohoolcraft to the northern penin-
sula, which was then an unbroken;
wilderness.

VICTIMS OF R-101 DISASTER SHOWNI
LAST RESPECTS BY FRENCH PEOPLE

T FL T1
BALL T~i S SL

1.

ANN ARBOR

DAKOTA CURATOR
WSBRIEFSVISITS
Russell Reed Seaksl Infornmaioh
m ere on had:! :7 Life.
~V~n ccd~~.tll SotInterest in the Indians_: . of the

'r

r

Ath!etics and Cardinals Given Will Display Prints I
Share of Gate Receipts An exhibit of fine art prints will
by judge Landis. 10 di payed next Thursday and
Friday at the Jones Elementary and
OTHER CLUBS ALSO PAID Junior High school, it was5 announc-
od ycs Lerd~e,,. More than 150 prints,
(1v ;sociatd Press> reproductiuvs of old and modern
CHICAGO, Oct. 16. - Baseb;3,1masters, will be on display. Stude nts
Commissioner Kenesaw M. Ldis and teachers will discuss belore vi-
today sliced up the $953,772 World sitors the history of the prints and.
Series melon for 1930. Manager the artists. Among the artists who
Connie Mack, coaches Eddie Col- will be re )resontecd in the exhibit
fins and Kid Gleason and 21 Phila- are such famous names as de Vinci,
delphia Athletic regulars receivedVan Dyck, Gainsborough, Titian.'
checks for $5;033.07 each, while Raphael, and Murillo.
Manager Gabby Street, Coach Clyde -
Wares and 22 St. Louis Cardinal Repubicans te Meet
regulars received $3,536.57 each.
Frank Higgins, of the A's. re- Republicans of Washtenaw eoun-
ceived $3,778.55, while Charles Per- ty will open a pre-election cam-
kins, Homer Summa, Roger Cramer paign series Tuesday with a dance
and R. V. Ohl received 82,51ti.03in the community hall at Webster.
each. Jimmy Moore, rookie Athletic Candidates for county offices will
outfielder, received but $1,259.51. be introduced to Webster township'
Clarence Lloyd, Kirby Samuel, residents, a departure from the reg-
and George Puccineili, who had iuar political program of campaignj
limited service with the Cardinals, speech-making. A meeting is also
received $1,768.33 each, while Wil- nlanned for next week in Freedom>
liam Stocksick, who played a short township.
time with the Red Birds, received - ----
$500.
The rest of the melon was divided Tilley, M zm to a
up among second, third and fourth at Episcopal Banquet
place clubs and their players in the
National and American Leagues, the Marking the formal opening of
two contending World Series clubsis
and the commissioner's office, which this years program for the arris
received $95,257.50. Hall Episcopal student group, a
Commissioner Landis also sliced dinner will be served by that body
up the Chicago city series melon, in honor of the new students Sun-
one worth $117,110 gross. Each club
regular, former Manager Joe Mc- a night, Oct 21, at Harris hall.
Carthy and Coaches Ray Schalk Speakers at the dinner will in-
and Jimmy Burke received $1,235.71; elude Prof. Morris P. Tilley of the
each White Sox regular and Man- English department, Rev. Duncan
ager Donie :Bush and Coach Ber- E. Mann, new assistant rector of St.
nard Kelly received $796.35. With Andrew's church, who has recently
their second place money from the come to Ann Arbor to head student
World Series, each club regular re- work, and Albertina Mashin, presi-
ceived a total check for $2,073.32. dent of the student cabinet, who

Police yesterday reported the
first hunting casualty of the season,
which opened Wednesday. Ray Sim-
mons, 35, R. D. 6, was accidentally
shot in the left leg while climbing a
fence nca his home IHe was taken
to St. Joseph's hospi1. Simmons'
condition is not censiered serious.1
To Sell New Stamps
Vo1 Steuben two-cent stamps,
commemorating the two-hundredth
anniversary of the birth of General
Von Steuben, were placed on sale
yesterday at the main postoffice by
Postmaster A. C. Pack. The stamps
were received by Pack from the
federal postal department.
Will HeldLuncheon
Activities of the Southeastern
Michigan Tourist and Publicity as-
asociation will be outlined by Ward
I-I. Marsh, chairman of the advertis-
ing committee of the association, at
the Chamber of Commerce lunch-
eon today. Motion pictures of the
resort districts of the Thumb will
be shown and explained by Ray
Herrick, field secretary.

Michigan region prompted Russell
Reed, curator-of the State Historical
society at Bismarck, N. D., to visit
the University museums here yes-
terday.
Mr. Reed, who assisted Dr. M. R.
Gilmore of the University museum
of anthropology i his research
work among the Indians of North
Dakota, is making a trip througi
the Great Lakes region i search
of information on his chief line of
interest. While on his trip he is
visiting several museums, with hope
of securing some aid in his project
of constructing an earth lodge on
the grounds of the state capital at
Bismarck.
Boak Will Represent
Michigan at Kingston
Prof. Arthur E. R. Boak, of the
history department, will represent
the University at the installation
of William Hamilton Fyfe as presi-
dent of Queens college, at Kings-
ton, Ont., on Oct. 24.
Professor Boak, who has been a
member of the faculty here since
1914, holds a master of arts degree
from lQueens college-

An elaborate funeral ceremony in which high French and British
dignitaries participated was held in the town hail of Beauvais, France,
for victims of the recent R-101 disaster. The above picture shows the
procession leaving the town hall for the railway station where the coffins
were placed on a train to be returned to England. The dead were given
military honors by the soldiers of France before leaving.

i

e

I

NOW
SHOWING

k
x t
. ;, t :.

In discussing exploration in gen-
eral, 'Professor Hobbs said that the
greatest period of trial and worry
was during the weeks before the
expedition left civilization. The
financial troubles coupled with the
absolute necessity of making the
most detailed preparations were
far mnore unpleasant than the
hardships of thetrip itself. But on
the other hand during the =eXpedi-
tion itself such as the one he car-
ried on in Greenland the partici-
pants ate heartily, gained weight,
and came back greatly strenthened
physically, he added.
(Discusses Byrd Flight.
In discussing the Byrd south
polar trip he stated, while the
flight to the pole was planned to
give the whole expedition a popular
appeal,-Byrdi had himself told, him
that the scientific achievements
were >far the most satisfying result
of the expedition. Professor Hobbs
further added that a discovery of
Prof. L. M. Gould of the geology
department here, who -was second
in command on the expedition,'
might prove the existence of a
water channel between the Ross
and Weedel Seas which would
divide Antarctica into two halves.
'In regard: to the proposed Wilk-
in expedition to sound the Arctic
sea 'by means of a submarine, Pro-
fessor Hobbs said that he con-
sidered the .idea somewhat risky
but that 'he had implicit faith in
the ability and knowledge of Wilk-
ins.
FLIER LOSES LIFE
IN SEVERE STORM
Army Lieutenant Crashes While
Escorting Other Plane.
(By Associated Press)
HEYENNE, Wyo., Oct. 16.-Lieut.
William W. Caldwell, Army flier,
met death in a mountain blizzard
when his fast pursuit plane crashed
near Lookout, Wyo., as he sped east-
ward on a mission to rush to Newj
York documents attesting Japan's
ratification of the London Naval
Treaty.
The Boeing Radio Station here
stated Caldwell was flying in "zero-
zero" weather, meaning there was
neither ceiling nor visibility and'
that 'he could not see the ground
when :he crashed.
Lieut. Caldwell lost his life after
becoming separated Wednesday
from Lieut. Irvin A. Woodring, not-
ed pilot, who battled through the
storm to Cheyenne and today was
winging east with the precious doc-
uments 'picked up from a steamer
early Wednesday at Victoria, B.C.,
to rbe hurried to London, via New
Yok.
Woodring's plane carried the pa-
pers and Caldwell was flying an-
other plane as an escort.

COl tZTlDUE
Noted Physicist Will Speak This
Afternoon in Room 1041,
Physics Building.
Dr. Alexander Goetz, professor of
physics at the California Institute1
of Technology, will speak on the
production and characteristics of
single crystals of metals and in par-
ticular the crystalization of metal-
lic crystals in strong transverse
fields, at the physics colloquium to
be held at 4:15 o'clock this after-
noon in room 1041, East Physics
building.
Professor Goetz has built elabor-
ate apparatus with which he has,
obtained important results in the
field of crystal structure. After
studying at the University of Goet-
tingen for his doctor's. degree, he
Went to the California Institute of
Technology as an international fel-
low, where he remained as an in-
structor. He spent one summer lec-
turing at universities in Mexico, and
another summer at the University
of Guatemala. A year ago, he left
California for a trip to the Orient
Where he lectured at the universi-
ties in China, Japan, and Bangkok.
After travelling through the Indian
and Mediterranean countries, he re-
turned to Goettingen and lectured
for a year in the Institute of Ap-
plied Electricity of the university.
He is now on his way back to
IPasadena where he recently accept-
ed the associate professorship at
the California Institute of Technol-
ogy.
FO
HOME MADE
CANDY
AND
GOOD LUNCHES
TRY
9UGAR BOWL
109 South Main

CONSIDER BUYING
NEW "IRON LUNG'9
University Hospital Director to
inspect Respirators.
Dr. Harley A. Haynes, director of
the University hospital, stated in
an interview yesterday that the
hospital is seriously considering the
purchase of an "iron lung" such as,
the one that has been the center
of so much interest in the Detroit
papers the past few days.
When Dr. Haynes goes to New
Orleans next week to deliver an ad-
dress before a meeting of the Amer-
ican Hospital association he will
also inspect the me hanical artifi-
cial respirators which will be on ex-
hibition there. Although the "iron
lungs" have not been phenomenally
successful yet the University hospi-
tal feels justified in buying one in
order to keep the hospital equip-
ment absolutely up-to-date and to
fulfill its function of saving lives.

NEW PRICES
Matinees
Adults
Balcony ..........25c
Main Floor ......35c
Nights
Adults
Balconys........35c
Main Floor ...... 50c
Children....... 10c
Anytime

IN
They're off! With Al Jolson n "Big Boy"
flashing under the wire an easy winner in the
comedy classic of the year!
Nothing ,but frolicsome fun-new songs,
new gags, new jokes-with the King of En.
ie taines at his inimitable best.

CHANGE TO ROUTE
In the automobile route from Ann
Arbor to Columbus, published in
yesterday morning's Daily, it was
stated that the motorist should
"turn left at Dundee." It should
have read "straight through Dun-I
dee for about four miles and then
turn left at schoolhouse on this
corner."

will nresent the student program
for the year. The group will meet
every Sunday night for discussions
to be led by prominent men.
LONDON, Ont.-Only seven mem-
bers of last year's London Panthers,
International League semi-finalists,
have been asked to report to Man-
ager Roy Brothers for pre-season
training.

t . 'ro"'

I I -.

Ii

FRATERNITY JEWELRY PARTY FA
ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY

VORS

I

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

All foFn

'Sunday
1:30 oc
11:00 P. M.M

~

Daily at
2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

Be yourself! Laugh,
love and make whoo-
pee! A mad, merry
mix-up of tropical de-
lights. Songs, sirens,
and frivolous fun. A
joy to see! A delight
to hear! So

START-ING
S ATU R DAY

LAST TIMES TODAY
,johnBarry oDeC K"

AS A
WITH

n1
~STAL UN
J c ,,O KI
JEAN ETTE MACDON-LD
~caramount
4 icur'

Badges

:

Guards

Pu
L U
No safe could baffle his nimble fingers-
No heart could withstand his fascination.
"Raffles," the Amatcur Cracksman, daring, auda-
cicus. beguiling. He knew the combination to zreas-
ur chests-and women's hearts.
Ronald Colman as the cntleman genius of crime
-screendom's great adventurer in his most romantic
role.

DARING!
No task was too
dangerous f o r
this modern
Robin H o od
who loved to
steal and stole
to love! A thrill
for all lovers,
for all adven-
tures!

"OUR OWN PEP BENNY RUBIN.
MEETING" IN
by Bob Howland "PIRA TES"
COMING SUNDAY

MEN were fascinated by
WOMEN hated her!

Burr, Patterson . Auld Co.
603 Church Street
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