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October 15, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNEDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1930

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WOMAN OFFICiAL LEAG VEPRESENTS

BOHMITORY OPENS'
DOBOS TO OUTSIDE
GROUP THIS WEEK
A.A.U.W. Will Meet Saturday
in Drawing Room of Mosher-
Jordan Hall.

ASSUMES OFFICEE AGUER ES
_; AIED AIo gLiTIES

DR. VINCENT TO

SPEAK

Regent Cram and State President
of Association Will be
Present at Meeting.
For the .first time since the open-
ing of Mosher-Jordan Hall this fall
it will open it's doors to an outside
group when the Ann Arbor branch
of the American Association of
University Women has it's first re-
ception and meeting of the year at
3 o'clock, Saturday afternoon, in
the drawing room of Jordan Hall,
which is the south unit of the
building.I
Miss Inez V. Bozorth and the
executive board of the A. A. U. W.
will receive the members of the as-
sociation and any new members
who are eligible and wish to join
the organization.
Any woman who is a graduate
of the following Michigan educa-
tional institutions will be admitted
to national membership: the Uni-
versity of Michigan, Hillsdale Col-
lege, and Albion College. Kalama-
zoo, Michigan State, and Olivet
College admit graduates to associ-
ate membership in the organiza-
tion. Mrs. Clifford Woodey, chair-
man of the membership commit-
tee, is following the national slogan
of "Fifty thousand members by the
50th. Anniversary of A. A. U. W."
in work this year.
Dr. E. Lee Vincent, of the Mer-
rill-Palmer school of Detroit, will
give the opening talk of the year
which will be of particular interest
to the educational groups of the
Association. The topic of her ad-
dress will be "Mental Hygiene of
Childhood" a subject which she is
qualified to discuss as a child psy-
chologist.
Mrs. J. W. Hornbeck, of Kalama-
zoo, who was elected state presi-
dent of the national association at
a convention held in Detroit last
spring, will also be present at the
reception of new members and'bus-
iness meeting, Saturday. Regent
Esther Marsh Cram, '98, honorary
member of the Ann Arbor branch,
will also attend the meeting.
Recent college graduates from
institutions through out the coun-
try are invited to join the Junior
Group of the A. A. U. W. which is
now a committee of the Branch.
HOCKEY SEASON
TO OPEN TODAY
Twenty-six hockey teams have
entered intramural hockey compe-
tition up to the present. With the
exception of five, all sororities were
represented at the intramural
hockey managers meeting Monday
afternoon at Barbour Gymnasium,
and plans were discussed for the
season.
Any sorority which did not send
its athletic manager to the meet-
ing, but intends to enter the tour-
nament is requested to send in the
names of the players on its team
to Miss Ruth Hassinger, instructor
of physical education, or to Eliza-
beth Whitney, '31ED., hockey man-
ager, immediately.
If the names of the players on all
the teams are registered at Bar-
bour Gyihnasium today the first
game of the season will be played
this afternoon, otherwise the sea-
son will open next Monday after-
noon.
You will get more out
of your University ca-
reer if you are able to
type your own notes,
themes and theses. Your

notes will be much full-
er' if you take them in
;horthand. Hundreds of
Michigan students have
learned typewriting and
shorthand at Hamilton
Business College. Many
have used it to earn
money on the side or
during vacation. You
will also fined it very
valuable in your career
after graduation.
Typewriting
Shorthand
Accounting
Secretarial
Training
FNMTFD AT ANV TTMLF

Associated Press Photo
Alice Jean LeGrosjean.
Recently appointed Secretary of
State of Louisiana, who was Gov.
Huey P. Long's private secretary
until her appointment at the death
of her predecessor, the late James
J. Bailey.
'ENSIAN PROVIDES
WOMEN'S SECTION
Method of Grouping Activities
of Women to be Improved.
In line with the attempt to ra-
tionalize the organization of the
1931 Michiganensian, representa-
tion of the women within the book
will be consolidated in an indepen-
dent Women's section as an im-
provement over the previous illo-
gical distribution of women's activ-
ities about the book. Although the
direction of the section will nom-
inally be under the supervision of
George A. Dusenbury, '31, managing
editor, practical execution of the
section will be at the discretion of
the women's staff.
Yesterday afternoon Margaret
Morin, '31, women's editor held a
meeting of the women's upper staff
at which general plans for the 1931
section were discussed. Ways and
means of working in new material
from the standpoint of the women,
such as the Mosher-Jordan dormi-
tory were considered together with
the general problem of making the
staff work more interesting.
Next Monday a meeting of the
entire Michiganensian editorial
staff will be held at which details
of staff and book organization will
be brought up.
FRATERNITY JEWELRY

Eleanor Cooke, '31, President of
League, Lists Departments
for Use of Campus.
MANY ROOMS NOT USED
"The campus does not appear to
be familiar with the various facili-
ties the Women's League building
offers its members," said Eleanor
Cooke, '31, president of the League.
"Though some persons use these
departments religiously, others are
not aware of their existence."
Following is a list of the depart-
merts of the League building, with
the exception of those of very com-
mon use such as the theatre,
lounges, and ballroom.
A launary is provided in the base-
ment of the building, where any
woman may wash clothes or sham-
poo her hair. Soft 'water, irons, and
electric dryers are available. There
are also showers in an adjoining
room; towels are furnished and
soap may be procured at the desk.
A beauty parlor and barber shop
are located on the main floor.
The chapel is also on this floor.
It is used for weddings, meetings of
a serious nature, and is the scene
of various religious services. Jewish
students hold services there Sun-
day evenings, and the Theosophists
and other groups meet in the
chapel.
The gardens on the east side of
the building are open to women
at any time. Many find it pleasant
to study there, and often serve tea
in the garden. The library on the
third floor is available at any time
for studying or reading. The
Alumni room opposite may be used
for bridge parties, or as a study
room when it is not reserved for
any other purpose.
A rest room on the third floor
has individual compartments con-
taining cots where women may rest
and smoke at any time. There are
two kitchenettes, onthis floor pro-
vided with dishes, cooking utensils,
and electric stoves.
The "cave" on the fourth floor is
used for meetings when it has been
specially reserved, and otherwise is
a gathering place for League mem-
bers. It contains a radio and vic-
trola, has an excellent dance floor,
and an adjoining kitchenette. This
room has-been a popular rendez-
vous and recreation room for
women.
Most women are familiar with
the lounges on the second floor,
the north, one for women exclu-
sively, and the south one for women
and men. Meals and refreshments
are served in the cafeteria, the
main dining room on the second
floor, and tea in the Russian tea
room. The food shop next to the
tea room sells pastries and breads.
PARTY FAVORS

WOMEN TO ENTER
IN GOLFTOURNEY
Six Highest Scores to Comprise
Team; Match Is Today at
University Course.
TO MEET AT 3 O'CLOCK

In an effort to find suitable ma-
terial for a women's golf team, a
golf tournament opens this after-
noon under the auspices of the
Women's Athletic Association. All
women are eligible to enter as it is
an all university tournament, not
merely interclass or intramural.
The competitors are to meet at
3 o'clock at Barbour gymnasium
and go from there to the new uni-
versity golf course where the
matches are to be played. There
have been no qualifying rounds so
that it is possible for any one who
is interested in entering to sign up
at this late date.
A medal score is to be played.
Freshmen may enter the competi-
tion as weX as entering upperclass
women if they have checked their
eligibility at the Dean of Women's
office and have had a heart and
lung examination.
The six highest scores will com-
prise the golf team while a second
team and substitutes for the first
team will be chosen from among
the remaining scores. Katherine
McMurray, '32Ed., is intramural
golf manager and has charge of the
tournament.
Zeta Phi Eta to Hold
First Meeting Tonight
Portia Lambda chapter of Zeta
Phi Eta, national literary and de-
bating society, will hold its first
meeting at 7:30 tonight in the Por-
tia room on the fourth floor of
Angell Hall. It is very important
that all members of the society
should be present.
Mary Kent-Miller Tennant, '27,
'28, Hannah Lennon, '31, and
Francis Johnson, '33, rushing
chairman, will outline the policies
of the organization for the coming
year. All those wishing to present
rushing lists must bring them at
this time.
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-
More than 500 freshmen have been
pledged by fraternities and sorori-
ties on this campus.

is

MISS EDNA THOMAS, STAR, TELLS
SECRET OF DRAWING AN AUDIENCE

I

"All singers should know people" I time and the opportunity to shake
is the star of success to which Miss hands with me. But to me it pre-
Edna Thomas, "the Lady from sents an opportunity to come into
Louisiana," who gave her perform- contact with them and to get to
ance in the Lydia Mendelssohn know more of their type."
Theatre last night, has hitched her In consenting to sing here last
wagon. And it has truly reached night Miss Thomas snowed her
the star, for she is one of the few interest in the Women's League in
artists who can be said to know which she has a rather personal
people as themselves and not as interest. Six years ago when money
a group of human beings gathered was being raised for the new build-
together in an audience to whom ing she gave a benefit concert in
she sing; and then disappears. Grand Rapids to help with the
Miss Thomas believes that when fund. Her coming here and singing
a cultu'.ed, well-bred woman ap- in the building which she helped
pears before the public, she will build is a salute to the women of
eventually draw an audience of the Michigan.
same type-people who can appre-
ciate the art she is able to place --
before them, who react emotionally
the way she wishes. "For after all," COLLEGE BE/
she declared, "it is those who are Wc
emotional who are truly apprecia- SI AMPO( AND FiNGER WAVE
tive of art."SHAMPOO ANDFMARW..E
She went on to say that an ap- SHAMPOO AND MARCEL.
preciative audience means much MANICURES
Imore to a singer than a great FACIAL S ..........
singer means to the audience. By Expert
"People will go to hear a singer Open all Evenings
simply because she is a celebrity,"
Miss Thomas stated. "They have
no personal interest in her. But the
artist has a great personal interest
in these people. They represent to CANDIES
her the object of her work, and
their appreciation can make or
break her."
"All these women have come here
today," she stated in speaking of
the tea given in her honor at the
Chi Omega house, "just to meet
me. It means little or nothing to
them except half an hour of their
New Theatrical Group

......... . ....... .. . .....$ 1.00
............$1.00
DR
..............:. . .50
.. . . .s$1.00
tOperators

to Give Matinee Plays
Miss Amy Loomis was hostess at
a tea Monday afternoon in the Gar-
den room of the League building
given for the 25 women recently se-
lected as members of the group to
further the use of the Lydia Men-
delssohn theatre. At its initial
business meeting held at the same
time plans were discussed for work
along three major theatrical lines
namely, acting, business, and stage-
craft.
Rehearsals will start on Monday
for a children's play to be given
three Saturdays in November at
matinee performances. The commit-
tee chosen to select the play will
make its final decision on the play
to be the first production at a meet-
ing at 4 o'clock tomorrow.

LIGHT LUNCHES

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We wish to
- Announce
the opening of
The Observatory
Custom Made Hat
}>:Shoppe and
Beauty Salon
-1402 Washington Heights
Opposite New Moser Jordan Dormitory
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FrI

ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

r

.a . A.A.A . A.. t a A .A ... A . AJ.4 A.a.

0 _

___ _ _.
R , .
_ _ --- __

Special Sale
of
Travel Prints
WEDNESDAY
9a. m. tolp. m.
ies4

DULL, KID,
In Brow,
to Cool
Smart Str
A classic one-strap
to wear with the dc
Autumn clothes.

,n or Black
reel Outfits
350

slipper in dull kid
lep colors of the new

Reg. $1.50

No Charges

n,

All Sales Final

MEZZANINE
SHOE SHOP

Reg. $1.25

[ Reg. $1.35 Sale Price X1.09 pr.

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