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October 10, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I
FRTP Y, OC T (-?DPM 10, 19301

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

rR!DAY. OCTQ~ER 10. 1!3fl Tl-1F~ MICHIGAN DAILY

_ ..

1'

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lffMVA EWE
J ._.- 5- uZJZS 5

1

Pan-Hellenic

Elects

Chairman

of

'31

Ball

and

MARGARET HELY,
KATHERINE WILCOX
RECE IEPOSITIONS
Paf--Hellenic Banquet to Take
Place in League Building
on October 27.
BALL TO BE NEXT MONTH
Scholarship Cup Will Go to Pi
Beta Phi for Second Year
in Succession.
Margaret Healy, '32Ed., was elec-
ted chairman of the 1931 Pan-Hel-
lenic Ball, at the meeting of the
Pan-Hellenic association which was
held yesterday in the Cave at the
League building. At the same time
Katherine Wilcox, '31P., was chosen
chairman of the annual Pan-Hel-
lenic banquet.
Members of all the sororities in
the association attend the banquet
with their pledges. At this time
the scholarship award is present-
ed, and the speakers discuss some
angle of sorority life which pre-
sents a sufficient problem. This
year the affair, which is informal,
will take place Monday, October
27, in the ballroom at the League
building.
The scholarship cup, which goes
annually to the sorority maintain-
ing the highest average for the
preceeding year, will be presented
to Pi Beta Phi. This is the second
successive year that this group has
received the award. Any house
receiving the cup three years in
succession will gain permanent
possession of it.
The Pan-Hellenic ball, which
takes place each year on the Fri-
day following Thanksgiving day, is
the one affair sponsored by the wo-
nen on campus to which independ-
ent and sorority women alike in-
vite the men. The affair is for-
mal and also takes place in the
ballroom at the League building.
At the meeting yesterday, a per-
manent time of meeting was de-
cided upon. The association will
meet at 4 o'clock on the first Tues-
day of every month. Helen Chee-
ver, '31, is president of the Pan-
Hellenic association for the present
school year.
W.A.A. COMMENCES
WORK FOR SEASON
Vacancies op Executive Board
to be Filled at Meeting.
Activities will begin for the Wo-
men's Athletic Association when
the first meeting of .the executive
board is held at 10 o'clock tomor-
row morning in the Women's Ath-
letic building, according to an an-
nouncement by Helen Domine, '31,
president of the organization.
Beside t h e regular business,
names will be considered to fill the
present vacancies on the execu-
tive board, and it is important that
every member of the board be
present at the meeting unless ex-
cused by the president. A second
meeting will be held next Thurs-
day, October 16.
BUTLER UNIVERSITY - The
student council recently began a
campaign to secure the continu-
ance of an omnibus line which is
convenient to the students.

CHOSEN TO HEAD
ANNUAL BANQUET

MANUSCRIPTS ARE
GIVEN TOJUDGES
Emily Bates Announces Receipt
of Five Plays for Junior
Girls' Show.

TIME OF MEETING

SET

Receipt of five manuscripts for
the Junior Girls' Play was announ-
ced by Emily Bates, general chair-
man, at the meeting of the central
committee held yesterday in the
undergraduate office at the Wo-
men's League building. Plans were
made to read these plays Tuesday
and Wednesday nights, October 14
and 15. The judges will be Dean
Alice Lloyd, the members of the
central committee, and the direc-
tor of the play.
A time was set for regular meet-
ings of the committee, which will
be held at 3 o'clock on Thursday
of each week. The names of sub-
committee members which were
passed upon yesterday will be an-
nounced as soon as the eligibility
of the women.has been determin-
ed.

ROYAL BETROTHALI
REPORTED ABROAD I
_X X
{ k
. Associated Press 'h/otM
Princess Eudoxia
of Bulgaria who is reported en-
gaged to Duke Charles of Spoleto,
son of Prince Aosta of Italy.

I

Women Have Proven Their Proficiency in
Study of Organ, Believes Palmer Christian
T~nr~ "( irin i~n nchnn fra i-nl n thn Hrma ( fPIlI

Katherine Wilcox, '31P.,
Who was elected chairman of the
annual Pan-Hellenic banquet to be
given October 27, in the ballroom
at the League building.
HONOR RDAE
AT LEAG UE AFFAIR
Reception in Ballroom is First
Function Ever Given for
School as a Unit.
Graduate students will be enter-
tained for the first time in the an-
nals of the university as a separ-
ate school, at a reception tonight'
in the ballroom of the League
building.
The reception will be similar in
aim to those given each summer
for all summer school students to,
create. a feeling of friendliness andE
informality among the group. Dr.
Carl G. Huber, dean of the gradu-
ate school, and Mrs. Huber, will re-
ceive the guests tonight.
Edna Thomas Will
Be Honored Guest
at Tea on Monday
Edna Thomas, who is called "The
Ambassador of Song to the World,"
will be the guest of honor at a tea
given by Chi Omega oh Monday,
October 13. The president and
chaperone of each sorority house
and dormitory on. campus, the glee
club advisers, and the patronesses
of the sorority have been invited
to meet Miss Thomas.
Not only is Miss Thomas a sing-
er but she is also an actress. She
has charmed her audiences the
world over by both her singing and
speaking voice. The London Times,
Le Figaro, Paris, Lokalanzeiger,
Berlin, the Sydney Herald, the
Egyptian Gazette, Cairo, and El
Sol, Madrid, all join in singing her
praises as an artist. With such a
reputation preceding her arrival
tickets are selling rapidly at the
box-office in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn theatre for the performance
on Tuesday night, October 14.
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS-The
student hospital here is paying $10
a pint' for blood to be used in pre-
paring infantile paralysis serum.
Two students have made the sale
already.
- - -_

Palmer cristian, wno has been i
giving the Wednesday Twilight Re-t
citals in Hill Auditorium for thej
past six years, believes that women
students have equal chances with
men in the study of organ.
"Women are very eager to learn
and work very hard," he said.
"Some are taking the course with-
out credit and accomplishing re-t
markable success. The men are
usually intent on pushing forwardj
to Concert work, whereas few wo-
men actually plan to do this. The
latter desire to play in the home,
in some of our large churches, or
teach theory.
"Some of the largest churches
object to women organists because
the direction of the choir requires
such strict discipline and they be-
lieve that men are better able to
maintain this. However there are,
critics that prefer women, believ-
ing that they have a lightness and
delicacy of touch that a man does
not possess," said Mr. Christian.
Women Attain Distinction
"Until recent years it has been
the custom to go abroad to study,
but now it seems to be an accepted
fact that due to the latest im-
provements in the building of or-
gans in this country and the a-
mount of interest cultivated by
teaching, there is a greater oppor-
tunity right here. We have fresh-
e- thought and newer methods de-
void of tradition." Mr. Christian
states that there are some very
prominent women who have been
obtaining distinction as organists.
He heard Mrs. Charlotte Lockwood,
New York, N. Y., play at a conven-
tion at Toronto Canada and be-
lieves her to be one of the most
successful organists of the day. He
attended a convention of the Na-
tional Association of Organists at
Los Angeles this summer where
Miss Lillian Carpenter, another
leading woman organist played.
Audiences Are Appreciative
The audiences for Mr. Christ-
ian's Recitals are made up of an
equal number of men and women
usually. Both seem to be appre-
ciative just as far as they are in-

Lerested ei program.ne ee s
that each individual has his own
favorities and he tries to make his
selections as representative as pos-
sible.
Mr. Christian states that he is
just as interested in women stu-
dents as he is in men, and remarks
that they work as faithfully and
are as appreciative as the others.
"It is the training and perseverence
of t h e individual that really
counts," he said.
There will be no dance at" the
League tonight in order to avoid
any conflict with sorority rush-
ing formals. A dance will be
held as usual, however, tomor-
row night in the League ball-
room.
~- ~-

I

Organized Nursing Is Answering Needs
Of Middle Class, Believes Director

"Organized nursing is reaching
out to answer the needs of the
modestly salaried group just as
more than 15 years ago it organiz-
ed public health to meet the needs
of poverty," so stated Janet M.
Geister, headquarters director of
the American Nurses' association.
"Waste is the result of the pres-
ent system," according to Miss
Geister. "Unemployment in the
private duty field has reached a
peak this year.
When we need a doctor, he comes
to us for 15 minutes, half an hour
or an hour, according to our need,
and is able to do more for us in
that short space of time than could
the practitioner of a score of years
ago in a much longer time.
"But when we need a nurse, we
engage her on the basis of the en-
tire day, whether the patient needs
24 hours of continuous nursing or
only an hour or two each day."
The result of this maladjust-
ment is that there are large num-
bers of persons not now receiving

the skilled nursing they need be-
cause they cannot afford to pay for'
it. The wealthy class can buy the
services of a nurse; the poverty
group has nursing care given to it,
but the moderately circumstanced
group often goes unnursed.
To meet this need, many official
registered have been formed. The
nurse works on a full-time basis
through the registry, ministering
to the needs of several persons
each day.
It is to ascertain the place of the
registry in relation tu community
health programs that the Ameri-
can Nurses' association is under
taking its survey.

Your New Hat-

modeled
head-
Our trained
in every way

to your

cutters are
capable of

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