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February 26, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-02-26

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PAGE

T R P M I r P T ('- -A: ' ,.T t-I A t f V

a a Iv I'. L- 1 I J/A I L4 1 TITJRS

DAY, FEBRUARY 26,.1931

b

aw

Veenker

Resigns

From

Oi%9 0
Verille

Cacig S a

VeenkerTakesPost
n at Iowa Institution
FOOTBALL ENTOR

Purple Natators .
to Face Varsity
Outstand ng Dual Meet of
Year to be Staged Tomorrow.,

TO ONCHIchg
General Strength of Michigan

IMIANs'
LEFT

PILOT SEEKS TOIMPROVE
SIDE OFCLEVELA]I T'S INFIELD

Will Take Charge of Gridiro
Sport at Iowa State
Next September.
Coach George F. Veenker, hea(
basketball coach and assistan
football coach at Michigan, has re-
signed from the Michigan athletic
staff to accept a position as hea
fotball mentor at Iowa State Co
lege, at Ames, Iowa, according t
an announcement made public b
the coach himself yesterday.
Coach Veenker will remain wit
the University of Michigan coach-
ing staff for the remainder of the
present season , and will continu
to act in the capacity of instructoi
in the Michigan summer school oi
coaches until next September, when
he will assume his new duties at
Iowa State.
Loss to Mhigan.
The resignation of Coach Veen-
ker will be a great loss to -he Mih-
igan coaching staf. For the past
five years he has been a valuable
aid to the head football coach, and
for the past three seasons has
guided the destinies of the Maize
and Blue quintet.
Veenker has made many friends
throughout the Western Conference
as well as at Michigan, and was
well satisfied with his position
here, but he has alwoys desired to
be a head football coach, and the
opportunity came when T. N. Met--
calf, Director of Athletics at Iowa
State College, offered him the posi-
tion of head gridiron mentor.
Veenker stated yesterday that he
greatly regretted leaving Michigan
because of the large number of
friends and acquaintances he had
made during his five year stay here.
He also expressed himself as re-
luctant to give up his work with
the present basketball team, most
of the members of which will be
returning to play again next year.
To Coach Football.
The resigning mentor is recog-
nized as an excellent football coach
with a thorough knowledge of the
game. He is conceded to be one of
the most able gridiron scouts in the
game today. His ability to analyze
opponents' plays and formations
has been of great assistance to the
Michigan gridders Many of the
Wolverine elevens own formations
and plans of attack that have been
the result of Veenker's efforts.
In. his first year as head basket-
ball coach, Veenker sent his quintet
of cagers through the Conference
season with but two losses to finish
in a tie with Wisconsin for the
Conference championship. The fol-
lowing year the Wolverine lost but
four games, but this was not good
enough to win the title, and the
Michigan five had to be content
with a fifth place in the standing.
Again this year the Wolverines
have lost several games, but the
squad is composed almost exclusive-
ly of sophomores, and still has a
good chance of ending up near
the top of the ratings.
Jack Malloy, from North Adams,
Mass., is called the best all-around
athlete at West Point. He has col-
lected two letters each in football
basketball, baseball and track.

By I-' i
By Cullen Kennedy IDcdnFaor
y ! I rcken Should Prove
A n n u a 11 y, Northwestern and DecidingFactor.
Michigan meet in a swimming con-
test which is universally recognized Some real action will be seen
as the outstanding inter-collegiate next Saturday night in the field
dual meet of the year. With both house when Coach C> Hoyt
schools having had national and stacks his track stars - ┬žainst
world record holders almost every 'the Chicago aggregation t: thin-
year, the encounter draws interest clads, who are bringing several of
from every section of the country. the ranking luminaries of the Con-
Keen rivalry has existed between ference to show the Michigan boys
the two schools for many years, es- some real speed in some of the
n illz hx~n t.ha ai l n

VEENA1EF - COACH
Varsity basketball and assistant
gridiron mentor, who has resigned
his post at Michigan to become
head football coach at Iowa State
College. He will stay at Michigan
until the end of the summer ses-
sion.

Cpeciaiy wnen Leir tank Leams
face each other, as the champion-
ship usually goes to one of the two.
The always powerful Wolver-
ine swimrming aggregation has
lost but one dual meet in six
years and that was when the
Wildcats scored a 3'7-32 tri-
umph in 1929 in the new In-
tramural pool. The meet was
a fierce one, but the Michigan
tankmen later redeemed them-
selves and avenged their defeat
at the hands of the Purple by
swamping their opponents in
the all-Conference to walk off
with the Big Ten champion-
ship.

In the following year, 1930, the
Wolves and Wildcats reversed the
whole procedure, Northwestern
carrying off the honors in the all-
Conference affair, after the Michi-
gan tankers had beaten them in
the previous dual meet, 40-35. Com-
ing back in the championship con-
Yearling Thinclads Will Hold test, the Purple secured 45 markers
to Michigan's 31, a quintet of stars.
Telegraphic Contest With Captain Schwartz, Hinch, Peterson,
Illinois Trackmen. Howlett, and Wilson, accounting
--- for all but four of the 45 points.
Yearling track men are preparing However, this year's encoun-
for their first outside competition ter which will be held at 7
of the year, a telegraphic meet with o'clock tomorrow night will be
Io s, thehyear, asegraphic edletdwi principally a battle of sopho-
^linois, which has been scheduled more stars, both teams having
to start next Wednesday and con- lost heavily through graduation
tinue through Friday. last June. Untried as they are
Comparison of the first year men ( in stiff competition, tomorrow's
with those of other Big Ten schools contest should uncover several
new men of exceptional ability
is impossible at present, but several in nearly all events.
of the yearlings have hung up some Covode and Wilson, of North-
ieal records in the inter-squad western, and Ladd, Smith, Raike,
meets which have been held under and Valentine of Michigan are the
the direction of Coach Ken Doher- only veterans who placed in last,
ty. The high jump and the 35- year's meet, Valentine, captain ofI
pound weight records have been the Wolverines this season, swam
broken by this year's squad. The in the medley relay which took
dashmen, too, have shown some first as well as taking second hon-
real speed. ors in the 150 yard back stroke.
The Illini were sort of washed off Ladd finished third in the quarter
the track by the Notre Dame fresh- mile swim, Smith placed second in

events.
The Maroon mile relay team,
composed of Letts, Cameron. Iay-
don, and Bibbs, is rated as their
biggest threat. Last week in a meet
with the Iowa tracksters, the Chi-
cago quartet ran away with the
event. They are rated as one of the
best baton passers in the Big Ten
competition.
Letts Wins Mile.
Letts also took a first in the mile
run, tying with his own teammate,
Brainard. They turned in a ,time
of 4:30.8, which looks well for
Wolfe of the Maize and Blue squad,
who chalked up a time of 4:26.7 in
the opening meet last Saturday.
Wolfe, however, will have to be at
his best, for Letts is one of tne best
runners in the college ranks and
can lower his time to around 4:20
when the opposition demands it.
Eddie Tolan. who has been add-
ing new laurels to his already
I famous name, will also find some
real competition in Captain East
of the visiting Maroons. East ran
the 60 in :6.3 in the Iowa meet
while the best Tolan could do was
:6.4 last week.
Austin Favored.
Austin seems to have the two
mile event cinched if he can repeat
his record breaking performance of
last week, for Kelley of Chicago
has not been able to do the grindI
in the Michigan man's lace. Cam-
eron and Brainard also star for the
Maroons in the half and quarter
mile runs respectively. Turner of
Michigan can be depended upon to
take the 880 event, for the best
time that Chicago has turned in
yet is 2:5, .
The quarter mile will probably
go to Chicago unless Russell can
improve his time. Eknovich, Glad-
ding, and DeBaker will also be
pushing the pace setter in this
event. Michigan is going to be woe-
fully weak in the high jump and
shot put events, but as the situa-
tion stacks up now, the Maize and
Blue should muster enough team
points to run off with the meet.

I

By Sheldon C. Fullerton.
(Editor's Note: This is the fourth
of a series of articles dealing with
the chan~ces of the major league
clubs in 1931).
Two weak positions, both on the
left side of the infield, loom up be-
fore Manager Roger Peckinpaugh
as he starts his Cleveland Indians
Ithrough their training paces at
New Orleans. With capable men
filling the shortstop and third basej
assignments, this team,.the young-
est in the big leagues, would make
a deterinned bid for the pennant;
as mttvye stancl now it will prob-
>.ly have to be content with a
rt2 diviSion berth.
Eddie Morgan, the Tribe's regular
iirst baseman in 1930, has an-
nouinced his intention of quitting
the national game for a business
career, but this may be all a part
of a holdout stunt on his part. He
broke all records last year for home
runs by a Cleveland player, and his
loss will be keenly felt if he really
does decide to close his baseball
career now. In the event that he
carries through his threat Lew
Fonseca, American League batting
champion in 1929, will play first
base for Cleveland.
Johnny Hodapp, who made the
most hits of any player in the
BIG TEN BOWLING
MEET ON TONIGHT
Michigan Teams to Use Union
Alleys for Competition.
The annual Big Ten telegraphic
bowling meet will be held tonight$
at 7:30, the Michigan contingent
bowling at the Union alleys.
All schools in the Western Con-

I
C
I
,;

.- - - - _ _ .

S $ <hockey race. The final results rest
in the two-game series that the
Wolverines play Friday and Satur-
day nights with the pucksters of
Minnesota. The games will be play-
ed on the Coliseum ice, each being
scheduled to start at 8:30 P.M. and
the admission will be 50 cents as
f ; , Q i ryusual.
Michigan decidedly has the upper
hand in this series, as it needs only
one victory to cinch first place in
the Conference. With that win
tucked under the Wolverines' belt,
a they can afford to tie the remain-
ing tilt or even drop it to the Go-
phers. Only in the event oflosing
Roger Feyki ughboth games will the Maize and Blue
,enpug ice team be removed from the top,
league in last year's U)c ampaign. will but in that case it will be pushed
have no competition for the sec- clear to the basement of the three-
ond base job. At shortstop there team league.
will be a battle between Johnny Crowd Expected.
Goldman, a good fielder but a light Coach Eddie Lowry predicts a
hitter, and Bill Hunnelield, who will fast moving and hard-fought series
be trying for a comeback in the and he expects the Coliseum to be
majors after being cast aside by filled each night. After the spec-
Chicago. Two youngsters, George tacular -exhibition of hockey given
Detore and Johnny Burnett, will here last Saturday night against
fight it out for the hot corner Wisconsin before the record crowd
assignnent, with the former being of the year, it seems most probable
slightly favored because of his hit- that the local rink will be packed
ting ability. Lind, Winegarner, and again for this series. The fans have
hooks are other infielders with the already seen what hockey offers in
club, the way of real entertainment, and
(Continued on Page 7) they are expected to come back for
more.
c SWordsmenPrepare Exactly the same style of playing
exhibited Saturday will hardly be
or Big Ten Rivals in order this week for obviqu .rea-
sons, but the Gophers have im-
proved much since the Wolves took
The Wolverine fencers, confident them down twice earlier in the sea-
despite their overwhelming defeat son and they should give Michigan
at the hands of Illinois, are sched- a real run for its money this time.
uled for some intensive drills in Lineup Intact.
preparation for their meets this There wil be no changes in the
F'iday and Saturday against Chi- Michigan lineup of Tompkins,.goal-
cago and Wisconsin at Chicago. - ie; Prouse and Williams, defense
Little is known of the strength men; Crossman, center; and Reid
of the two week-end opponents, ex- and Schlanderer, wings; and there
cept what is deduced from their seems to be no reason to expect one
showing in the race last year. Chi- after the showing they made last
cago lost to the Wolves 10-7, where- week. Joey Frumkes is the only
as Wisconsin was not met. The spare now.
Badgers, however, finished at the Minnesota's lineup will include
bottom of the heap, failing to (Continued on Page 7)
glean a single point against Con-_ --- -___
ference opponents, and are rated HOCKEY NOTICE
little higher this year.CE
Vanderhoff, the only veteran on Freshman hockey practice will
the Midway squad this year, lost be held at 6:30 o'clock tonight at
both of his matches in the meet the Coliseum,
last year.

PcKs TEAM NEDS
1,, IN TO GAIN TITLE
Single Victory Will Give Varsity
Undisputed Possession
of Big Ten Toga.
This week end will see the deci-
sion of whois going toake first

{ ference will take part except Iowa.
Last year the meet was won byI
Chicago with a score of 2970, while
Michigan bowled 2543 for sixth
place. The results of the different
tee ms will be telegraphed to Ohio
Stat University, which is in charge
of the affair. The winning team
will receive a trophy which is of-
fered by the Ohio institution.
Joe Arsulowicz, a former Intra-
nmural manager who has charge
of the Union alleys, will pick the'
five men to compose the Wolverine
tCam from the following bowlers:
Maloney, Murphy, Schwenker, Fon-
tana, Gustine, Bauss, and Kallock.
New pins will be used for the
match.
A match between the winning
team in the Inter-fraternity tourn-
ament and a picked team of In-
dependents will be sponsored by the
Union at the close of the Inter-1
fraternity matches. Prizes for this1
match will be offered by the Union.1

men last week, the Champaign boys
winning first places in only the shot
and the broad jump. The winners
of these events, however, Kamm
and Henning, chalked up better
marks than Coach Doherty's men
have been able to make.
Younger sprung a surprise the
other day when he turned in a new
record for the six-lap distance, a
3-4 mile jaunt, IIe was timed at
3:23.G, the old record made by Haley
last year being 3:25.3.

the century free style, and Raike
took a third in the fancy diving.
The free style relay which
was set at 160 yards in the
short Northwestern pool, has
been lengthened to a 400 yard
event this season. This race be-
tween the two opposing quar-
tets was the outstanding feat-
ure of the 1930 battle, Michigan
setting a new worlds record of
1:13 2-5 seconds to lower the
(Continued on Page 7)

\1

x(1

lilt

SU ITS

liI1

I

Where will the two slanting
lines meet if the shorter one
is continued? Good eyes
are needed for this one.

t,. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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