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May 29, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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GOLF STAR AIMS
AT BRITISH TIT LE

PEGASUS SELECTS
EXHIBITION RIDERS

2tor

as

wO-
Jun-

,ring~

Show to Review Society's Work
for Year; Many Features
to Be Included.
Sixteen members of Pegasus, rid-
ing society, yesterday were select-
ed to participate in the exhibit of
the organization scheduled for 3:30
o'clock this afternoon, in the va-
cant lot adjacent to the League
building.
Those who will take part are
Helen Clark, '34, Elizabeth Cooper,1
'34, Dorothy Dye, '32, Charlotte
I ughson, '.32, Margaret Hayes, '32,
Alie Keegstra, '32Ed, C o r r i n e
Krentler, '32, Cile Miller, '32, Jean
Perrin, '32, Marianna Paddock, '32,
Janet Michael, '32, Irene Thomas,
'33,i Josephine Rulison, '31, Eleanor
Rairdon, '33, Phyllis Swift, '34, and
Ruth Babbitt, '31.
The riding show, which will give
a review of the- work done in the
society this year, will be made up
of many features. There will be a
"musical chair" feature, and a dis-
play of hurdling. The show horse
Ahmod will be one of the features.
Besides other races there will be an
egg relay which will be of great
interest, and two sets of form rid-
ing. Those taking part in the first
part, which will be done with pac-
ing horses are: Irene Thomas, Cile
Miller, Eleanor Rairdon, and Ruth
Babbitt.
The next form exhibit will be
with horses walking, trotting and
cantering. Those in the form will
be Dorothy Dye, Eleanor Rairdon,
Cile Miller, Charlotte Hughson,
Elizabeth Cooper, Corrine Krentler,
Jean Perrin, Marianna Paddock,
and Josephine Rulison.

E RNEST COSSARAT HC
TRAINING VALUAB
Dramatic Festival ArtistgGives
Views on Value of Stage.
Apprenticeship.
Bly M.:0. 'II, '33
Mr. Ernest Cossart looked very
ill at case in one of the most un-
comfortable chairs in the League
lobby, but his friendly greeting in-
dicated that his is not a resentful
spirit. RHe seated himself cautious-
ly on the edge of another chair and
delivered himself of sundry state-
ments on the value of a college edu-'
cation as a preparation for the;
stage.
i "Well, if a person is an actor, it
iborn in him, and not acquired,"
he said, after due deliberation.
"College is an invaluable asset in
that it 'gives a man or woman 'stage
presence,' but the years spent inr
college are most important in dra-'
matic work, and might well be
spent in acting."~
Mr. Cossart picked imaginary+
specks off of his subdued black and
white checked suit, and adjusted a,
WORKING CAPACITY OF AGES
DOES NOT VARY MATERIALLY
WISCONSIN-A comparison be-
tween the working capacities of
young and old persons which was1
recently conducted at two of the
leading Pacific coast colleges re-
vealed that both groups scored just
about equally in the tests. They
were given to college professors who'
ranged in age in two groups, from
25 years to 40 years of ag~ and from
60 to 80. The young pers~ns worked
a little more rapidly but age did not
impair accuracy. The elderly men '
made more self-disparaging re-
marks than the young ones.

OLDS COLLEGE Modern Students
LE, NOT ESSENTIAL Differ Radically
brig~ blue tie. He spoke of the inMn"Rset
Thea e Guild's policy of sending in Many Respects
special. companies to tour college
towns, and agreed that a college "To know modern students with
audience is more appreciative of any degree of thoroughness is tol
genuine worth in plays and acting. discover that they are almost total-
"One of my favorite roles is thelI
one I enacted in Bernard Shaw's ly alien to their predecessors of two
'Arms and the Man,' " he stated, dis- decades ago," says Elizabeth Wins-
regarding a discreet reportorial low, in an article published in The
cough and extinguishing his cigar- North American Review.
ette on the windowsill. 'I am very "The student of today is sur-
fond of any of Shaw's plays, for lpiigywl nomdaotmn
his manner of looking at things i prisingly well informed about many
unusually searching, and they have things not contained in books. He
a depth that is significant.'" has a more practical knowledge and
is in many ways more at home in
WOMEN SUCCEED the world helives in than many of
AS SALESPEOPLE I those who teach him. He is sur-
prisingly resourceful. Put him into
Gift of Persuasion Important a social situation baffing enough to
in New School of Selling, a diplomat and watch him turn it
into a triumph.
"Men are becoming favorably in- "His ability to handle practical
clined to the woman salesman, even problems naturally reduces the stu-
dine tothewomn saesmn, vendent's awe of his teachers. He meets
when it comes to disposing of mer- them respectfully, but is not im-
chandise supposed to be decidedly pressed. His elders are often appal-
cut of her ken," states Miss Cath- .led by his ignorance of the Bible
erine Oglesby in an article in the and of the Classics.
June Ladies' Home Journal on "The "Therefore," she concludes, "it is
no wonder that students seem
Woman Salesm'an." changed. The contemplative life
"The gift of persuasion is the vi- has gone out of fashion. Youth, liv-
tal requisite of this new school of ing at high speed and with Eliza-
selling that is in vogue ┬░today. To bethan intensity, is in no mood to
this type of selling women are To sit at the feet of its elders and say,
ye par-'Tell us all.'"

ALICE LYNCH
Pi Lambda Theta Gi
to Outstanding Sc
Education Cla
In accordance with a
tablished last year, Pi La
ta, woman's national ho
cational sorority presen
nual award to the most
woman in the Senior
class at a social meeting
day night in the Leag'
The award, a prize of $
primarily, upon profess
ity and scholarship.
This year Alice Lync
Herminie, Pennsylvania
woman chosen to be th
of this distinction by t
tee of the faculty of th
Education. Miss Alice I
of Women, presented th
Miss Lynch. Louise Gar
was chairman of the
which arranged the af
Esther Belcher, Grac
elected by the society
president during the cc
Carol Wheeler, '31Ed, w
president and Helen Dc
is the new secretary.

I

Associated Press Photo-
MAUREEN ORCUTT, well-known
>lf star of Englewood, New Jersey,
ho is shown as she sailed from
ew York for Europe in quest of the
ritish women's championship.,

setting was the most
the play calls for a
it from those which
I in the past, it will
Professor Jones add-
tAreBetr HEALTH EDUCATION:
.o Professor Jones'
sier to put on a two- University High School Tests'
one with three, acts, Junior High Students in.
of! the manuscripts;
idea as the length Developing Courses.
e play may be writ-
ynopsis form, or in In developing a curricula of
i'ner. health education, it is necessary to
;ts for the play will go through a testing stage in or-
y, October 5. Those der to know. just what must be in-
ubmit a manuscript 'cluded in the course. The health
een to the meetings department of the University high
Lch with Jean Bots- school is just at this ,stage now.
er information and They are planning to give a
r a summer address' health knowledge test to the stu-
ion before next fall. dents in the junior high school be-
fore the end of the present semes-
INCREASE tei which will be an adaptation of
the Gates-Strang health knowl-
ENDENCIES edge tests.
It is also planned to give these
r Believes Cinema same students a health practice
Mental E f f ort. test to get some indication of the
students knowledge of common
s ur ehealth practices such as diet, sleep,
adsea oupowes-ofcleanliness and the like.
ands leadusctoChmen- Elizabeth Cadle, grad, who is a
article in La Revue student in public health, is making
azine, published in a study to deermine the attitude
of junior high pupils towards var-
ious types of behavior of which they
fsuggestion in ort approve and in these tests, she is
intellectual efforti involving the question of recrea-
yi-made thoughts on tional interests and their curiosi-
sine smpe flkties about themselves. It is hoped
rly in images, the that some leads may be gained
estined to replace from this work which can be used
es of ordinary lazy in determining the health educa-
gues. tion program.
e thought at first Dr. Mabel Rugen, health corre-
this art paralyzes lator, in discussing this work said,
perhaps it stimu "I realize the \inadequacy in these
nation. But -on the tests and the need for a more ade-
s it. A well-writtenIquate technique but this is one at-'
;, a setting furnish- titude for determining our health
fer to the imagin- program and it is hoped that we
, of departure for may gain much from it."
y grow and expand
bile. On the screen, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY--As a
The rapid succes- result of two months' canvass,
leaves no place for $136,900 has been subscribed by the
Lations on the part senior class for their class insur-
The spiritual dy- ance payable to the 1931 Class
ach one of them is Memorial committee in May, 1951,
yed by that of the for any use which the present b dy
Monsieur Chape- decides upon at their twentieth .e-
xplain. union. -s

COST OF AVERAGE NEW YORK DEBUT
ESTIMATED AT $15,000 BY 'FORTUNE'

Cost

Per Year to Parents
New York Is About
$3,000,0000-

in

"It costs a girl $15,000 to make
her debut in New York society and
maintain her place there for the'
rest of the season," says an article
in a recent issue of "Fortune." Since
about 200 girls make their bow to
the social world every year, New
York parents spend over $3,000,000
per annum to announce to the
world. atlarge that their daughter
is now prepared to marry.
The article goes on to state that
the figure given above is but a con-
servative minimum. The average
ball at which she "comes out" is
above $10,000, but if her family is
very well known she can step into
the whirl with a small dinner or
tea dance which can be given for
about $2,000.
"Since there is now no Ward Mc-
Allister to tell her whom to enter-
tain, she has to turn to the well
organized bureau headed by Miss
Juliana Citting. She has a list of
all the eligible bachelors in the city,
besides a classification s t a t i n g
whom to invite, and to whom to
send regrets. She has been said to
have charged $500 for the privilege
of seeing her list, alone. For other
services, such as seeing that a de-
butante attends the proper number
of charity balls, contributes to the
proper charities, is seen at the
right places at the advantageous
time, etc., her fees run in the vi-
cinity of $1,500.
"Such then," concludes the arti-
cle, "is the complicated machinery
which operates to create a New

York debutante. It is the fear of
not being seen somewhere and the
great pain of going there. It is
engagement after engagement and
eventual and fearful boredom.
Would it not be an improvement if
the parents could substitute for
this lavish method, the simple an-
-nouncement that their daughter,
Miss So and So, was now prepared
to marry?"

ticularly well adapted. For women,
are inherently 'hors,t and consci-
entious--far more so than men.
They have an intuitive faculty of,
surmising the interest and reac-
tions of others-a talent for in-
stantlyreadjusting their plans to
the situation,'I! she affirms.
"The successful sales person must
be an actress. She must mirror the
interest, emotions and aims of her
prospect. She must play to her au-
dience because she likes that audi-
ence, enjoys the thrill of contact
and wishes to win approbation.
"There is also a host of other
virtues: A thorough knowledge of
one's product and i s rightful place
in the business sphle, quick judg-
ment, a healthy love of adventure,
a wealthy fund of spontaneous wit
and good Ehumor, and a zest for
combat-fo, every sale is a chall-
enge of wits. These are essential
factors which create the personal-
ity of the successful saleswoman,"
she says.
I SPEC IAL!I

A
FRTM

r

ITY JEWELRY PAR]
RCADE JEWELRY SH
CARL F. BAY
JEWELR AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickel6 Arcade

/fitL'Qm as11'

t fir very(
dlroucj/tt'ir co-
Pd. al"0f romv
_ "Jiz o/kzs Jqc
/ t P1oare
cw0 '.Ia create
for eyrcd 2te

/,

TH E PANAMA
HAT
It is extremely becoming
as well as smart-and
appropriate to wear with
this Summer's sport
clothes.

/

Corsages

for the

, ', L{,ICI iji.
'; ;
, . s ,,;y. ,

SENIOR BALL
University Flower
Shop, Inc.

.

$5.00 and up

Dana Richardson
In the Arcade

Phone 603 0

E. L IBE RTYAT MA
" exc/u s -thOl3

229 S. State

I

We Deliver

' ,
Alp'llimll milli,

M

Choice of The Hot

o
;E

e robbing the sil-
ential characteris-
ruining the pres-
reducing them to
he concludes.
AYER SAILS
cCune Harper, a
can tennis player
nd for the Wim-
to attempt to
it. of last year at
iss Betty Nuthall,
won the American
imer

0ne DolarSale

D1 SS

EVENT

Offering today's finest values, newest styles, and
greatest selections.

of
SUMMER

MILLINERY

$

415 FROCKS-EVERY ONE BRAND NEW
CHOICE OF THE HOUSE
For Every Summer Need
- FOR FOR
FORMAL SPORT
DANCING AFTERNOON
STREET TRAVEL
GRADUATION BUSINESS

}

FROM 9:00 UNTIL.1:00

a~l

Today is your lucky day . . . we are offering a group
of fine summer hats at a saving that you will find only
once in a lifetime. There are hats designed to comple.
ment every type of beauty . . . and all head sizes are
here. Be sure to take advantage of this special offer
S. come in early this morning.
$1.00 and $

IN ALL OF THE SEASON'S
GLORIOUS SHADES

IN THE NEWEST, FINEST
MATERIALS

a r r i v a1 s - Ideal
ier foundation gar.
Corselettes and
s are included in this
shipment of Sum-

MAIZE
NILE
WHITE
PASTELS

PEACH
PINK
NAVY
,HIGH SHADES,

CHUDDAHS
FLAT CREPES
BATISTE
EMBROIDERIES

SHANTUNGS
SILK NETS
ORGANDIES
EYELETS

ALL SALES FINAL

kiGB"

.~' ~

Pr-

AV-

r ;:; f

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