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May 29, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

RS TO HOLD ANNUAL.CONFERENCE
LICK SPRINGS, INDIANA, NEXT MONTH

HABR WINTER SEEN
BY LABOR LEftDER

.. .
i
i
.=

Today's Radio Pr
(Eatern Standard Time)

V~

Class
a in

-EIVED

yester-

President of A.F. of L. Advises
Dividing Available Work
Among Laborers.,
WASHINGTON, May 28.-(1P)-
President William Green of the
American Federation of Labor sees
indications of a hard winter ahead.
He believes its effects could be min- I
imized by adoption of a four-point
remedial program.
Asserting that a less than nor-
mal increase in spring employ-
ment this year forecasts a worse
winter than last, unless immediate
steps are taken, he proposed Wed-
nesday night that employers guar-
antee continued work to as many
men as possible.
"A guarantee of employment to'
even a portion of the country's
work forces would help business
revival enormously and bring relief
from anxiety to thousands of work-
ers' families," Green said.
Compared with spring improve-
ment in properous years, he said,
"this year's employment gains have
been small indeed." He estimated
that of 6,300,000 out of jobs in Jan-
uary less than 1,500,000 had found
work.

th,J
ies

Ruth Lyon, soprano; L il l ian
Knowles,Lcontralto; William Miller,
Chauncey Parsons, tenors; Arch
Bailey, baritone; Leslie Arnold,
basso; and an orchestra under the
directiln of Josef Koestner will be
heard over the National Broadcast-
ing chain at 8:30 o'clock.
In the premiere of a new series
of Pond's dance programs Leo Reis-
man and his orchestra will present
some of their best harmony over
Stations WGY, WRC, and WENR at'
8:30 o'clock. "You Said It," "Sweet
and Hot," "Mama Inez," "Egyptian
Ella," "Bolero," and "Out of No-
where" will be a few of the num-
beis which will be played.

The popular "Zwei Herzen in I tions WABC, WOKO, and W
Takt," "Listen to the Mocking 5:30 o'clock. "The Desert Sor
Bird," "Sweet Marie," and "Aloha be sung by the tenor, while;1
Oe" will be the numbers on the' Rich's orchestra will play
Boscul Moments program featuring, Don't Know What You're
Mme. Alda, soprano, and Frank La-I "Say a Little Prayer for M
Forge, pianist, coming over Sta- "You Bet Your Life It's Love
tions WLW and WBAL at 6:15 ry von Zell will act as the :
o'clock tonight. announcer.

Tonight's list of dane
supersedes that of any
this week with Paul
and Fletcher Henderso
tras heading the list c
good bands. Harry Res
tra, Nat Brusiloff, Euge
dy, Vincent Lopez, Ge
Felix Ferdinando and
are some of the othe
which may be heard.
are Larry Funks', He
and Dave Abrams' orcl2

s mainly be-'
applications
om students
z school, ac-
L. A supple-
ing required
vc freshman
work of his

Columbia Broad
tonight is inaugur
late dance progi
WelchdandeDave A
honors in the pr
orchestra comes of
night and Dave A
play at 12:30 o'clo
station.

day, in-
resident
itains a
nVr aid l

r
G'

Associated Press Photo

Some of the governor s who will take leading parts in the annual governors' conference
Lick, Ind., June 1, 2, and 3, are shown here. Above, left to right: Harry G. Leslie, of Indiana;
Brucker, of Michigan; Gifford Pinchot,,of Pennsylvania. Below: Franklin D. Roosevelt (left), of
Harry H. Woodring, of Kansas.

at French
Wilbur M.
New York;

r.
am pro-
eriod on
Monday,
years, in
ents may'
nd rooms
fore they
visors. A

AS TRAIN
Score Hurt as E
Leaves Track
Whirlw

mpire Builder'1
in Freak
ind.

New Texas Strikes
Make Eastern Pa rt
of State 'Oi1 Poor'

na-i
h A. FARGO, N. D., May 28. - (AP) -
room Dashing along at a 50-mile-an-hour
ative .
be in clip, the crack Great Northern Em-
)nday pire Builder, coast train de luxe,
ation eastbound from Seattle to Chicago,
a re- was picked up like a toy from its'
buses. tracks and wrecked by a tornadoa
eight miles southeast of here late
Wge ednesday. One life was lost, more
rthe than a score injured, one probably
ts fatally, and scores of passengers.
tsshaken up by the freak accident.
The death resulted when Andrew
Anderson of Monlesano, Wash., was,
hurled from the train through a
and window and ground to death be-
neath the wheels of the following
coach. Mrs. Emily Hannan, Seattle,
received a broken 'back and was
said by physicians today to have
a slight chance for recovery.
SMrs. N. Troll, Minot, N. D., also
was said to be in a serious condi-
tion at a Fargo hospital where
many of the injured were taken.,
An infant daughter of Mrs. Hilda
mbly Qualley, Winchester, Wash., who
also was injured, received a serious-
ly bruised head.
The train had crossed the North
-The Dakota-Minnesota line and was
yter- nearing Sabin, Minn., with Engi-
vegan neer B. E. McKee of St. Paul at
f the1 the throttle. Without warning, as
oving if handled in a cradle, the entire
eport 12-coach train was lifted from the
tance tracks, moved east from the road-
er of bed, and deposited with a thud on
the prairie, leaving only the engine
from and tender on the tracks.
ounfl

i;

LONGVIEW, Tex., May 28.-( P)-
Texas has had 36 years of oil field
experiences, but the east Texas,
strike has. taken its place as unique'
among them all.
East Texas is oil poor.
The Spindletop in 1901 and
other rich discoveries came with no
such overproduction as now exists
to weigh down the market. The
new strike was made in the midst
of precarious days for the oil in-
dustry, with prices at rock bottom.
Naturally there was a great in-
flux of unemployed, bringing the
permanent residents' serious prob-
lems of caring for down-and-outers.
After six months of drilling the
production area had not been defi-
nitely determined, and the Texas
railroad commission was forced to
do considerable guessing in an
effort to fix the potential.
In the days of the Spindletop ac-
tivity near Beaumont in 1901, the
Ranger find in west Texas in 1917
and Burkburnett and Desdemona in
1919 and 1920, oil was worth much
more, there was no necessity for
proration and its attendant slack-
ening of activities.I

EDWARDOS TO LEAD
MEMOHRILPRD
Newkirk to Give Principal Talk
at Court House to All
Military Units.
Major Basil D. Edwards, com-
manding officer of the University
R.O.T.C. will act as grand marshall
of the Decoration Day parade.
The parade will form at 10 o'clock
Saturday morning at the Engineer-
ing Arch. Major Edwards and a
staff consisting of Captains Arthur
B. Custis and Robert H. Lord, Lieu-
tenant Richard H. Coursey, Russel
J. Darling, '31, and Oscar T. Perkin-
son, '31E, and a representative of
the American Legion and Veterans
of Foreign Wars, will head the pro-
cession on horseback.
Directly behind Major Edwards
will march the first division, com-
manded by Captain C. A. Powell.
This group will be composed of the
R.O.T.C. arid band, and-the Nation-
al Guard. The second division led
by Leo Burns, commander of the
Ann Arbor American Legion, and
general chairman, will follow the
first. It will consist of the G.A.R.,
Spanish-American war veterans,
Veterans of Foreign Wars, Ameri-
can Legion, and Ladies Auxiliaries,
and the high school band.
The parade is to march to the
court house where Mayor H. Wirt,
Newkirk will be the p:incipal speak-
er.
Two Men Fined
Finding them guilty of disorderly
conduct, Judge Bert E. Fry fined
Lela McClinton and Steve Arnole,
both of 308 Detroit avenue, $15 andi
costs apiece.

As a further remedy he reiter-
ated a request that "some thought-
less employers" discontinue "snip-
ing at wage standards." A pay-
cutting policy, he contended, en-
genders a fear for the future that
leads men to buy mly necessities.
All available work, he said,
should be divided pro rata among
employes since each man has a
"moral claim" to at. least a share.
He also suggested that as the relief
question "next winter bids fair to
be worse than last," immediate
plans should be made by the proper
agencies.
"Unless industry, labor and our
governments face this problem
now," Green said, "next winter's,
suffering may be worse than last."
Youth Gives up Navy
Caeer to Go to Sea
KANSAS CITY, Kan., May 2.-
( P)-Edward F. Railsback, 23, is
quitting the Navy so he will have
a chance to go to sea.
A longing for the life of a sailor
sent the young man to the navall
academy at Annapolis where he
found he would graduate into a
land job.
Naval reduction, he wrote his
father here, makes it possible for
some 35 members of this year's
graduating class to resign. Rails-
back said he would resign and ac-
cept a sea going job with a com-
mercial shipping company.
Edwin Turner Initiated
Into Honorary Society
Edwin T. Turner, '33, was initiat-
ed into Sphinx at their initiation
last Tuesday instead of Noel D.
Turner as announced in Wednes-
day's Daily. Turner made the re-
sponse for the initiates at the -ban-
quet Tuesday night.
DRIVEWAY
PEBBLES
KILLINS
GRAVEL COMPANY
Telephone 7112

Annette Hanshaw, featured star1
on the Van Huesen program will
sing three songs
n t o the micro-
:..' shone in the broad-
past tonight over
* Stations W XY Z,
WEAN, and WABC
at 9 o'clock. Her
numbers will be
"Underneath Your
Window ''onight,"
Say a Little Pray-
er for Me,' and
...,.. ~ I've Got a Sweet
A. Hanshaw Somebody to Love
Me." The orchestra under the baton
of Eugene Ormandy will play a pro-
gram of current popular tunes,
treated in special symphonic man-
ner. Larry Murphy, tenor, will sing
the vocal choruses.
Theo Karle will appear in the
afternoon program of Roy Atwell's
Tide Water Inn coming over sta-

igenette, Cavaliers -
quartet - WXYZ,

The track and field events of the
fifty - fifth annual- Intercollegiate
A.A.A.A championships at Franklin
field, Philadelphia, will be described
by Ted Husing from there over a
nalion-wide network of stations in-
cluding WABC, WXYZ, and WOR.
The broadcast will last from 2 to 4
o'clock in the afternoon.

7:15-[

8:00-Billy Joneesand Ernie Hiar-WJR,
WREN, KDKA
Cliquot Club, Harry Reser's orhestra-
WWJ, WGY, WRC
8:30--LeoRneisman and his orclestra-WGY,
WENR, WPCO
R~uth Lyon, Joseph Koestner - WJR,
WLW, KYW
9:00-L-ois8ennett, Don Voorhees - WJR,
WREN,.KK RA
Annette Hanshaw, Eugene Ormandy-
wxYZ, WEAN, WABC
9:30-The March of Time-WXYfZ, WFOL
R.K.O. TheareoftheAir-WWJ, WGY,
WTAM
10:0-Fetcher Henderson and his orchestra-
WABC, WLBW, WBCM
10:30-Vincent topez and his orchestra -
WWJ, WTAM
George Olsen and his orchestra -
WLBW, WBCM
11:-Paul Whteman and his orchestra -
WGY, WR", WEAF

oan his orchestra -
his orchestra-WGAF
his orchestra-WEAI
and his orchestra -

5:30--Roy A-
WABC,
6 :00--Kat~e
WGR,
Mme.,
6':35-Final1
7 :00-L.ou t

Water Inn--WEAN,
Ter Swanee Music--

11:30-1

12:0--Re

12:30-
1:00-1

Da

State May Force Cut
in Conservatron Menj
L A N S I N G, May 28.-(/P)-The
state conservation department may
be forced to reduce substantially
its personnel because of a lack of
funds for the coming biennium,
according to George Hogarth, di-
rector.,
K^Vf BLit TRAVE L BUREAU
A 0 P-F
4IIimmuko -. NN~i~k~~imim

We Make Our
Last Day-

Dollar

Day

We close the doors
Friday night, 10

forever
P. M.

n General Aset
es Birth Control
-Its Program.

A.

Army Fliers Stationed
at Long Island Fields
NEW YORK, May 28.-(P)--More
than 1,400 army flyers, temporarily
stationed at five Long island flying
field" during the defense maneu-
vers, remained on the ground to-
day while 650 airplanes were be-
ing overhauled and inspected for
the flight to Washington via Phila-
delphia Friday
FII'

Ma s tic
2:00-3:40-7:00-9:00
LAST TIMES TODAY

III

A Pew of Our Many
Specials

as a

I-

I

I

vorce and remar-
day executive ses-
' with a decision to
.ts report that sec-
roval of birth con-
ced because of eco-
or because of ma-

The Player's League

Presents

controversy
the assembly
election of a
the selection
ur Mud:e of

"This and That"
A Brilliant Musical and Dance Revue
Everything new, novel and interesting-ably presented
by a huge cast.
WhitneyTh.

no otner candidates nave
ntioned. Dr. Mudge is now
lerk of the church and its
communicant members. He
is slated for re-election to
t, that of chief executive
f the church. A sermon by
ring moderator, Dr. Hugh
1Kerr of Pittsburgh, elec-
he new moderator, and or-
>n of assembly committees
e assembly docket for to-
RIGHT SPOT '
802 PACKARD ST.
~n rI .t? .-4 ' .fl t =

. l,. f.
T.
r.
".M
.
t
,d .,- - - , 5

2 pr. Ladies' Full Fashion Hose.
Up to $2.00 '10
values...........
C o r s e t s, Corselettes, Girdles,
values up to 01*0
$6.00 go at ......
Ladies' Scarfs, values up to
for .
Ladies' Wash Dresses -- $1.00
values ,go at
2 for " 1PL't
Crepe de Chine Underwear,
values up to
$4.00, go at......
Ladies' B 1 ou s e s up to $3.00
values,
$1.0
go at .... ..$ .
Velvet Ribbon, values up to $2.00
yard., go at
3 yards for....:. . .0
French Kid Gloves 1a
go at, pair...... 1.00
25 pieces of notions, values up
to 20c apiece, 1 00
go at 25 for.....
The Bankrupt Stock of the
Lyndon Shop - 606 East
Liberty Street o p p o sit e

June 2nd, 1 93 1

Another Hit for the Girl whose 'Sabra'
Won the Heart of the World-and

F Scale of Prices: $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00
Mail Orders received now. Address Box Office, Whitney Theatre.
- ~ - - ~ ~ - -- - - ~ - ~ ~ -

this Time

It's Laugh - Packed Farce.

(9

r

NOW

. °

2:00-3:40
7:00-9:00

SHOWING

SLIM SUMMERVILLE AND
HARRY LANGDON

Gay . . . Silken! . . . Hilarious! . .
Romance with a Walloping New Kick
IRENE DUNNE

with;
the ever popular
CHARLES FARRELL
and his new leading lady, the
gorgeous continental star
E L ISS5A L AN D I
- Directed by
Alfred Santel
ADDEDn
Johnny Burke in.

30c
to 7

A. UAlG ,

AI

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