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May 26, 1931 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-26

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EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 26, 1931

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1 1 1

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IYCIL P

urka Thoroughly Enjoys Doing
Greek Drama; Likes Ibsen Plays

I

to

By Margaret O'Brien
Expansive though regal, the Yur-
ka swepst away all the 'usual for-
malities of an interview, and spokel
from the heights of the charms of
a college town with a disarming
quality which almost convinced one.
that she meant what she said.
"I thoroughly enjoy doing Greek
drama,", she stated, "not so much
for the drama itself as for the
pleasure one gets in appearing in
any great masterpiece. As long as
there are any, truly worthy plays,
it seems a- crime to waste time in
the ordinary ones which abound."
A flip of her voluminous brown
handbag sufficed for utter con-
demnation of Ordinary Plays.
Miss Yurka's eyes widened per-
ceptibly when the topic of Isben
was introduced, and her enthus-
iasm bordered on the unqueenly.
"I not only feel that he has writ-
ORIENTATIOM WORK'

ten nore plays with women's roles
which offer great opportunity for
an actress, but he has evolved the
greatest women's role of the thea-
tre, that of Hialmar Ekdhal in
'The Wild Duck,' ," she said.
"These tried and true great plays
must be approached from a differ-

S
i
1
',

SCORES OF BILLS
AWAIT BRUKEI
APPROL TDAY
Budgete Forecasts Property Tax..

MEDI 1CAL SOCIETY'
"URGES HOSPITALS
TO. FIGIHT CANER
Institutes and Clinics Asked to
Co-operate in Efforts
to Curb Disease.
GROUP ISSUES REPORT
Recommend Special Service by
All Public, Private
Agencies.

OF NEW COUNCIL

Have

'

PRESIDE
SPECIAL
VOTE UN

ilty Advisors to Be Assisted
in Instructing Members
of Freshman Class.
ganization of a staff of stu-
s to assist faculty freshmen

ent 'angle in order to get a fuller1
meaning out of them," Miss Yurka
went on. "Of course, one cannot,
read things , into them, for then
ideas that the author never in-
tended will creep in, and a certain
amount must be left 'to the imag-
ination of the audience."
Her gesture of dismissal was a
more or less obvious glance at the
clock, and the Queen Yurka disap-
peared into the democratic con-
fine of the League lobby.

New Judiciary Body
Will Meet Tonight

cary committee of the Interfra-
ternity council will be held at
8:30 tonight in Dean Joseph A.
Bursley's office, Howard Worden,
'32, president of the council, an-
nounced last night.'
( Professor Irving D. Scott, of
.the geology department, was ap-
pointed by President, Alexander
SG. Ruthven to be a faculty rep-.
f resentative to the judiciary com-{
mittee, Howard Gould, '32, secre-
tary-treasurer, said yesterday. N

of X30,200,000; Finance
Acts May Be Cut.
GOVERNOR PLANS TRIP
Election Code, If Approved, to
Eliminate Presidential
Primary Next Year.
LANSING, May 25. --(')- Scores
of bills adopted by the legislature
awaited Governor Brucker's ap-
proval or rejection today.
He has asked for opinions from
the attorney general on a number
of the measures. Because the gov-
ernor plans to leave the last of the
week for French Lick to attend the
governor's conference and immedi-
ately afterwards will go on a tour
of the upper peninsula to last until
June 15, he is afxious to dispose.
of as many as.possible this Week.
Budget Heads List.
=.Alfhough the budget heads the
lies in importance, as, it forecast a
proprty tax of about $30,200,000,
as" compared with the governor's
hopes for a levy of about $27,000,000
mny other important piees of
legislation have been submitted. If
he signs an election code approved
by the legislature there will be no
presidential preference primary in
Michigan next spring.
The governor has the' mangled
Teagan bills, which started out' as
a rod license and emerged provid-
ing increased fees to be paid by
conservation director, said today
his department plans to alter pres-
ent trout fishing licenses to $1.75
may be charged instead of the
present $1 as soon as the governor
.igns the measure. It is presumed,
he will approve the bill because he
fayors increased revenues for con-
servation activities.
Whether the governor can cut
(the items in the financial bills ma-
terially was a question.
Oppose Revenue Measures.
While the prospective tax on
property is about what the goer-
nor would like, the legislature left
no doubt that it was opposed to
special revenue measures. The size
of the state tax will be determined
dially by the state administrative
board later in the year, but it will
have to be based upon the amount1
the 'budget calls for after the gov-
ernor has exercised hi, veto power.
SBy the time the board fixes the tax
there may be more definite infor-
matipn as to whether the malt tax
is to be attacked in the courts.
Funeral.Services Held
for Dr. A. S. Warthin
Funeral services for Ir. Aldred
Scott' Warthin, director of the
pathological laboratories, who died
suddenly last Saturday morning,
were held yesterday at the resi-
dence on Ferdon road. -I
Rev.Henry; Lewis, pastor of St.
Andrew's Episcopal church, con-
ducted the services. The funeral was1
private, attended only by members
of the family and friends close to
Dr. Warthin.

I

NEW YORK, May 25.-(A)-Or-
ganization of special cancer insti-
tutes, service and clinics through-
out the United States is advocated
in a report made public tonight by
the directors of the American So-
ciety for the Control of Cancer
General hospitals and universities
are asked to co-operate.
Claimed 100,000 Lives.
The reports says that cancer took
more than 100,000 lives in this
country in 1929, being exceeded on-
ly by heart disease as a principal
cause of death.
"The directors of the American
Society for the Control of Cancer
advocate the organization of spe-
cial cancer institutes and cancer
hospitals, where funds sufficient
for their maintenance can be ob-
tained from private or public sour-
ces," said the report. Where separ-
ate institutions of his nature are
not obtainable,' they recommend
the organization of special cancer
services and cancer clinics in ex-
isting general hospitals for the fol-
lowing reasons:
Outline Reasons.
temethods
now available for the early diag-
nosis and successful treatment of
cancer in its many situations con-
sist in trusting this responsibility
to a group of interested members
of the hospital staffs.
j 2. Such a service can be organ-
ized in almost every large gener-
al hospital at a minimum expense.
3. The group method of study of
cancer, as in so many other fields,
has already contributed materially
to the advance of knowledge and
has improved the results of treat-
ment of the disease.
4. Such a service for clinics has
also great educational value.
5. It. does not seem too much to
hope that the future development
of s u c h clinics throughout the
country may raise the standards of
treatment.
Van Tyne Improved,
Cablegram Reports
Dr. Van Tyne, leader of the
museum of zoology's expedition
to Guatemala, who was stricken
with throat hemorrhages last
Friday, sent the following cable
from Belize to Dr. Frederick M.
Gaige, of the University Muse-
um:
"Arrived all right rapidly re1ov-
ering sailing today (signed) Van
Tyne."/
Dr. Van Tyne has been trans-
ported by carriers from Uasac-
tum, Guatemala and can now
receive the best medical atten-
tion and care.

Board C
of Mea

Believes

T

Alexander G.'Ruthven,
President of the University, who
will be chairman of the new Uni-
versity . council, plans for which
have been already approved by the
Board of Regents. The council will
take over legislative duties of the
University Senate.
RUTH VEN APPROVES
MILLTAX DECISION

Committing himself on' the sub- was i
ject of the Mill tax issue for the.
fiest time since the beginning of the Th
legislature's deliberations regarding actioi
a pronosed cut in the annual ap-e

BODY WII
SENAT
Faculty to
Represent
Admini
Plans adopted
University Sena
sity council wh
sede the Senate
ceived approval
mail and await
nowledgement a
the Regents F
Alexander G. R
terday.
The special ac'
the President a:
facilitating organ
body.
Immediately a

take care of
nd principal
wn payment

at tr.

me,

the fact that the number of fresi-.
men enrolled by Oct. 4 last' year
was nearly 200 smaller' than the
corresponding total for 1929. The
decrease, it was revealed, was dis-
tributed proportionately among all
schools on the 'campus': The pro-
portion of women in the total
freshmen enrollment has increased
steadily in the past'ythree years..
Because -the revised system of
registration instituted for the first
time this year by the registrar, by
which high school students may'
register in the University at the
end of the first semester of their,
high school senior year, it is ex-
pected that early registration will
be encouraged.

pointed out
mnnecessary
Aping these
lance com-

ion was taken onI
ewkirk's proposall
work for the un-{
pposition' to the'
n that workers be
per hour, it was'
ey be, allowed to
e and work with-
of turning the
city. A committee
y engineer, , ark
and mayor was

State Bulletins
(By Associated Press)
Monday, May 25, 1931
SAULTE STE. MARIE-Searchers
abandoned hopes today for Mil-,
lard C. Hootman, Charles A. Fergu-!
son and John R. Ferguson, all of
Lansing, who have b'een missing
since May 17 w hen they set out
by boat for a fishing trip in White-
fish bay.
BATTLE CREEK-Masons from
all over Michigan will convene here
Tuesday for the eighty-seventh an-
nual grand lodge session. They
will continue through Wednesday.
MT. CLEMENS-Eugene G. Don-
ohoe, of Detroit, was elected state
di-nutu of the Knimhts of Colum-

ALPHA EPSILON M'U
INiIA1TESNEIW MEN'
'Sixteen Admitted to National
Honorary Musical Group;
Officers Elected.
Sixteen m~n were initiated .into
Alpha Epsilon Mu, national honor-
ary musical fraternity at the semi-
annual initiation and banquet held
last night at theUnion. The off
cers for next year. were 'also elect-
ed.
Those who were formerly induc-
ed into membership are Alexander
S. McGaughan, '33A, Clarence A.
Schoen, '32A, Gordon W. Baleat,
'32, Rex L. Allbright, '32E, Robert
A. May, '33, Jerry E. Rosenthal, '33,
Hugh P. Gaston, '33, Frank 0. Riley,
'33E, Ralph, F. Fulghum, '33SM,
Keith R. Stein, '32SM, Carl H. Baus-
chke, '33SM, Elmer C. Oestrike,
'34M, Truman I. Steinko, '33, Phil-
lip T. Lincoln, '32,' Paul V. Thebaud,
'33, and Clarence W. Moore, '32:
Winchester Richard, '32SM, was
elected president while Louis Sco-
vill, '32, John Martindale, '32A, and
R o m i n e Hamilton, '32SM, were

CONKLIN APPOINTS
UNION, COMMITTEESI
Baldwin to Head Dance Group,
Townsend, Skinta Named
to Positions.
Union committee chairmen and
their .assitarnts for the coming year
were announced last night by Hugh
R. Conklin. '32E, newly appointed
president.
Eugene Baldwin, '33, was named
chairman of the dance committee.}
His assistants are William S. Han-
del, '33,' and John M. Landon,.
Joseph F.. Zias, 133 is to be .thle
house committee chairman. Under
himt will serve Melvin H. Rabe, '32,
and Sydney Edelman, '32.
John S. Townsend, '33, was picked
to head the publicity committee.
Assistant chairmen are Albin S.
Telford, '33, and'Frank B. Gilbreth,
'33E. John W. Lederle, '33, will serve
as chairman of the reception com-
mittee with John Huss, '33, acting
as assistant chairman.
George B. Skinta, '33, was ap-
pointed chairman of the underclass
committee. His assistants will be
Kenneth Yourd, '33, and Howard
Gould, '32.
These men will also compose the
executive council of the Union next.
year.
Speakers Considered,
for Oratorical Series
Tentative selection of speakers
for the 1931-'32 lecture series of
the Oratorical association was an-
nounced yesterday by Lawrence

Alexander G. Ruthven yesterday
expressed himself as,"pleased" with
the action taken on the proposal.
"I am pleased with the action of
the legislature in regard to thej ap-
propriations for Michigan State
college and the University of Mich-
igan," Dr. Ruthven' said.
"Strictly speaking, to place, a
limit on the Mill tax income is not
reflecting the spirit of the act; but
the University is glad to assist the
state in an emergency as far as
this can b' done economically and
without repudiation of fundament-
al principles.
"The two-year limitation of in-
come is not the important consider-
ation. The alternative'proposed, to
substitute an annual appropriation
(Continued on Page Two)
GAG OYLE WILL BE
ISSUED TOMORROW1
Final Copy of Campus Magazine
Will Include Cartoons,
Theatre Article.

F
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t

LANTERN NIGHT CEREMONY HONORING
SENIOR WOMEN TO BE HELD TONIGHT

be acted upon until
been approved by the
Faculties of' the v,
and colleges ofthe U:
requested by the Pre
special meetings for
representatives to the
tions in the literary
ing colleges were hE
Fourteen of the 34 fa(
of the council were
week.
Terms of Membe
Election of. the, dele
entirely in the hand
eral schools and col
said. They were ch(
specific or indefinite'
Twenty-three admit
cers, holding ex-offici(
form the remainder c
Under the new plan,
are particularly legisle
will be vested in ti
council. President Ri
when the measure wa,
this would mean "the
the large, unwieldy
powers to a Universit;
can deal more efficie
ministrative affairs."
By an alteration 'o.
draft, the faculty is
(Continued on P
Members of Busines.
Named by 'Ensiai
for Next Y
The upper staff of
department of the 11
ensian 'was named
Harry Benjamin, '32,'
ager of the publicati
Virginia M. Ladd,
pointed women's busi
George R. Squibb, '331
ed sales manager; G.
right, '33, organizatio
Duncan Shepard, '3
manager; and John
was chosen for accoi

Freshman Pageant and Picnic
f Will Precede Annual
Program.
By Elsie Feldmah
In honor ofsthe senior women,
Lantern Night, an annual ceremony
will be given tonight at Palmer1
field by the women of the Univer-
sity.
The event, sponsored by the Wo-
man's Athletic association and the
freshman class, will begin with a
picnic supper at 6 o'clock which
precedes the pageant. At 7:30 o'clock
the women will start to form at the
gate of Observatory Street.

en to the juniors who in turn will
carry garlanded hoops which are
to be passed to the sophomores and
raising them to junior standing.
The contribution of the freshmen
to the program is the freshman
pageant.
Albertina Maslen, '31, will lead
the procession this year. Each class
will be headed by four women who
have distinguished t;iemselves in
service and activities, and directed
by eight aides who have been chos-
en on the same basis. The leaders
and aides will be dressed in white,
the leaders wearing the colored
jackets which represent their re-
o'ra'4-'Ton d nicc

p Featured with an article by Tom
Powers, one of the members: of the'
cast for the Dramatic Festival, on1
the theatre, the June Gargoyle,
final issue of the year, will go on
sale Wednesday, Paul Showers, '31
managing editor of the publication,
announced yesterday.
Also included in the issue will be
be a full page of cartoons by Fon-
taine Fox, of Toonerville Trolley
fame, done especially for Gargoyle.
A full-page picture of Violet Hem-
ing will also be a feature.
Witfield Hillyer's "Persons to be
-Avoided -if Possible" is another
feature of the magazine, as is an-j
other full page of "Poetics" by Den-f
ton Kunze, '33.
Showers, to climax his career
with Gargoyle, has also written an
article which is a discoprse on mas-
ter's degrees. Some versification by
Thomas Cooley, '32, newly appoint-
ed managing editor of the publica-
tion, and an article by Gurney Wil-
liams, '31, are also featured.in the
issue.
Articles by other contributors and
cartonsA hu the r voih artaff or-

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