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February 25, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-02-25

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4,

"rW9L1 N A1' ( W I rANK

r)AITT

PAGF, TnIVA

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WL;DNE3i.DAY, 1 EtUARY 25, 1931I 1 iC.iVi l,1; 1 %a Piv uLh LL. a

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DUDY TO DISCUSS
P' NS OUO

Univej
In
A vigor
biological
ma thatt
empire in
remainsN
sity biol
sailed frc
district o
of the ex
selyn Va
of birdsc
Dr. Adol

F New York Financier
Gve Review of Financial
Prospects for 1931.

to

I -A LARGE COMPANY tr of i
Bartlett,
ment ofk
I Leids Presidency of Statistical The in
Organization Serving All ancientr
Important Cities. actun in
Guatema
Tohn Moody, president of Moody's stitution
Investors service, who is regarded carrying
as one of the most prominent men
in the financial world, will speak
at. 4:15 o'clock Friday afternoon in
room 1025, Angell ball on 'The Fl-
nancial and Business Galook for
1931." He will lectrew under the
auspices of the School of B3usinaes
Administration.
Mr. Moody exercises daily super- Candida
vision of his large statistical organ-
ization in New York city. His of I
branch offices are found in all the
other important cities of the coun-
try, and lie maintains an independ- Call fo
ent unit, Moody's Investors service, and busi
Ltd., in London, which serves in-
vestors abroad. ganensia
Through his control of this or-G
ganization, Mr. Moody has probably ing edito
as great a responsibility as any' '31, busi
other man on Wall street, since the men and
invsinmnt of millions of dollars is on the y
governed by the advice of the requested
Knowxs Financiers. the staffs
having been in financial work noon in t
since 188, Mr. Moody has been a Work c
familiar of some of the greatest senbury,
financiers of the past 30 years. He interestin
has enjoyed the confidence-or the "Thev
enmitdy- --of such men as the Goulds, for expre
Morgan, Frick, and Harriman. His routine j
understanding of business has been ative tale
increased during his long experi- he said.
ence and still keeps pace with the Ample
present trends. three ap
Mr. Moody took his first position the sever
in the financial world in 1896 with book is
the investment banking house of classes,a
Spencer Trask & Co. By 1900 he ties, frat
was manager of the bond depart- coing o
ment of this firm. He decided that will be
yr to pubish ,is first manual. both edit
ye~nr "t~oment. I
His decision to sponsor this publi-tryouts a
cation rose, in part, from his in- lower sta
ability to secure a reliable source more res
of financial information. the seco
Manual Popular. for appo
The first manual, a volume of and man
about 1,100 pages, received instant Women
approval. This was the progenitor freshman
of the present Moody's Manual of ly the sa
Investments, comprising more than arate wo
16,000 pages. Soon after the publi- editor a
cation of the first manual, Mr. charge o
Moody conceived the idea of a rat- section o
ing system on securities similar to In add
that employed by credit agencies. tor ther
After several years of experiment, who obt
he was able to announce Moody's much th
Rating. men's se
To these, Mr. Moody ascribes a the men
great measure of his subsequent Recent
success. They were instantly re- doned th
ceived by the investing public and dominat
have become a standard yardstick has ado]
by which the worth of securities layouts
is measured. ranks it
in the c
PLANS FOR BOOK
EXCHANGE GIVEN
Following a report on the success
of the venture, the Round Table
club announced yesterday that the
Used Book exchange, which the
club founded this year, will be con-
tinued, but has decided to keep the
exchange open only at the begin-
ning and end of semesters and
summer school. It will be open from
2 to 5 o'clock daily for the remain-
der of the week, so students may
call for the money on books sold.
The exchange proved a great sue-
cess, it was reported by Leonard
Kimball, president of the Round
Table club, and warrants being car- C
redod o.
"However, it should be regarded
only as a minimum expedient "
shaled Kimball.
Carator to Conduct i

Zoological Seminar,
J. Speed Rogers, assistant curator
Cif diptera in the division of insects
of the department of zoology, will p
SOIndlct :i ZOJOgy seminar at 7:30
o'clock Thursday in room 2116, Na-
tural Sin<ce auditorium.-
Heov. ir i di s 1 -abit t Distribu-
lion ot the Cran Flies of Northern
Floridaz ely Okkleberg, associ-
atie urofessor of zoology announced
yesteday. A

rsity Biological Expedition to Conduct
vestigation of Ancient Mayan Civilization
rous attempt to solve the seasons. From the standpoint of
I and archaeological enig- fauna and flora the region is prac-
the region of the old Maya tically unknown. Lack of roads, its
Northern Guatemala still
will be made by a Univer- uninhabi , d condition, and its men-
logical expedition which aces to health have combined to
om New Orleans for that leave it little explored. Though the
n Jan. 23. The personnel district has been seen from above
pedition includes Dr. Jos- by a few intrepid aviators, notablyl
n Tyne, assistant curator Col. Charles Lindbergh, who flew
of the University museum, over the land a year ago with two
ph Murie, assistant cura- archaeologists, the soil remains al-
ammals, and Prof. H. H. most virgin to the footsteps of ex-
chairman of the depart- plorers and investigators.I
botany. The museum party will collect in-
nmediate objective is the tensively the birds, mammals, and
ruined Maya city of Uax- plants of this district. Detailed ob-
the wilds of northern servations will be made on the
la, where the Carnegie in- habits and modes of life of the spe-
of Washington has been cies making up these groups, their
on excavations for five local distribution, their associations
and relationships in this enormous
I biological complex. Species new to
E;,[w5science will be undoubtedly found,
ei and the composition of the fauna
and flora of the region, with the
T II'S elationships to that of other parts
FO ri ofthe world, will be ascertained,
with its significant historical imoli-
cations. The collections will makd
tes for Work on Staffs large and important additions to
Michiganensian Will those in the University museums,
and the data accumulated, with the
Report Today. specimens, will furnish the basis
for detailed publications on this
r tryouts for the editorial little known country.
ness staffs of the Michi-I

4,. JTDiTOISCUSS'Is
LUIRTO ,ANN ARBOF
4irJERN " D f' NCry Ii

NEWS-BRIEFS

P T F T Pq, Y

JR LLUiU L UL iI
Recognized Authority to SpeakI
at 4:15 in Architectural
Auditorium.
WILL ILLUSTRATE TALK
Director of Buffalo Art Gallery
to Speak March 3; Editor
to Lecture March 5.
Architecture t h r o u g h o u t the
world will be discussed by Richard
J. Neutra, of Lcos Angeles, interna-
tionally recognized authority on
the subject, in a University lectureI
at 4:15o'clock this afternoon in the
auditorium of the Architectural
building.
The discourse will be based upon,
studies made by the speaker dur-
ing a recently completedtour of
the world. The title of the lecture
will be "New Architecture Through-
(out the World."
Writes Two Books.

LIOUOR VENDORS Miller, 502 North State street, in Student Group Expects to Soldv
front of his home, but the screams Rlgous l
BEGIN JAIL LIFE of Mrs. Miller frightened them Religious obems o
away, he reported to police.VrosScs
Convicted in circuit court last
Saturday for possessing liquor for Plans for weekly University all-
sale, Orrie E. Brown, 25, of Detroit, HEAD OF HARVARD denomination chapel services were
former law school freshman, and IA Y RESIGN POST formulated at the first meeting of
Joseph Looney, Ann Arbor, yester-MAY R SG Fthemstdntei stcmeeno
day began serving sentences of the student religious committee, a
from six months to two years in Lowell Plans to Retire in 1932, new advisory group, sponsored by
Jackson prison. Boston Post States. the Student Christian association,
Brown was arrested Jan. 28 in which has for its purpose the solu-
connection with an alleged campus (By A "ited Pr'ss) tion of religious problems of the
liquor ring, while Looney was ar- BOSTON, Feb. 24. - The Boston various sects at the University.
rested Feb. 11 after he had confess- Post says that Abbott Lawrence
ed to delivering liquor to five fra- Lowell, president of Harvard uni- The first regular Sunday services
ternities. versity since 1909, plans to retire be held at 4:30 o'clock March
The sentence of Brown carried at the close of the academic year1n'eand ap rm
reomnato fayeradaending in June, 1932. t he Women's League building. Wil-
r and- aa ni Kearns, '32, chairman of the
half. Looney was sentenced to He reaches his seventy - fifth coi mittee, stated that activity of
serve the full two-year term. birthday anniversary in December, the organization will ultimately
Deputies James Wanzeck and and is expected to submit his resig- center about efforts to build a Uni-
David Gartman acconipanied the nation shortly with a view to giving versity chapel building, which will
prisoners to the prison shortly af- the university ample time to choose house the religious work of all
ter noon yesterday, his successor, the Post reports. faiths represented in the student
June of 1932 will find the newly body.
Mrs. Roland Held instituted "house plan," Dr. Lowell's Sponsorship of a series of bi-
.fondest dream, in full operation at weekly seminars on comparative re-
A coroner's jur terd Harvard. He feels, according to the ligions was also decided upon by
turned a verdict of death cau dy Post, that he should remain in the advisory committee. The pro-
the impact of an automobile, the charge only until the plan is off grams of the seminars will be choS-
driver of which was undetermined, to a good start, then resign to give en and arranged by a faculty inem-
at an inquest into the fatal injury hissuccessor an opportunity to de- ber, as yet not selected, who will
last Wednesday of Charles H- velop his own ideas, serve as permanent director of the
Klager, of Ann Arbor. The "house plan" is the inclusion discussion group.
Klager died early last Thursday of most of the upper classmen in Students will have opportunity to
morning from injuries received seven "houses," or common cen- attend pre-Easter services at will,
when he was struck bact tralized dormitories, where they during a program that will be held
Washington street and Fourth av live together and study' together, at 12:05 daily in the Congregational
nue. regardless of intellectual inclina- church during the week preceding
Mrs. Belle M.Bolandtion or social background. Easter. The subjects of the serv-
s. Btele, M. Bon, od 1309 Two of the houses are now com- ices will center around the unlimit-
State street, is being held on a pleted and the remaining five will ed choice of the speaker, and will
charge of negligent homicide in be opened and in operation next be delivered in a half-hour discus-
connection with the accident. She fall. so nig t1:5ocok
will be given a hearing today. snedgt23 'ck
Police Search Futile FRATERNITY JEWELRY PARTY FAVORS

_ _ g

ALL DENOMINATE
SERVICES PLANNED

:.

I

,n was issued yesterday by
N Dusenbury, '31, manag-
r, and George Hofmeister,
ness manager. Freshman
women wishing to work
ear book this semester are
to attend a meeting of
at 4:15 o'clock this after-
he Press building.
on the 'Ensian, stated Du-
will be found to be both
ng and valuable.
work offers opportunities
ession of executive ability,
jurnalistic ability and cre-
ent of an artistic nature,"
room for the use of the
titudes is to be found in
al sections into which the
divided: administration,
athletics, features, activi-
ernities, and satire. Men
ut in their freshman year
assigned general work in
orial and business depart-
n their sophomore year the
dvance to positions on the
affs, where they are given
ponsibility. At the end of
nd year they are eligible
intment as junior editors
agers.
n coming out in their
n year follow approximate-
me course as men. A sep-
men's staff with a women's
t the head has complete
f the publication of that
f the book.
ition to the women's edi-
e are four Ojunior editors
ain their positions after
Le same work in the wo-
ection as is performed byl
in their section.
ly the 'Ensian has aban-
ie old Victorian style which
Rd it for some time, and
pted a modern scheme of
and photography which
among the best yearbooks
ountry.

TO REPORT TODAY,
Freshmen to Compete for Places
in Business Department
of Publication.*
"Work on the business staff of7
the Gargoyle is valuable in bring-
ing the tryouts in contact with
campus leaders, as well as in fur-
nishing business training which
may be of great value to the stu-
dent after he leaves the Univer-
sity," stated Bruce Palmer, '31, bus-
iness manager of the Gargoyle, yes-
terday, in discussing the freshmen
who will report at the Press build-
ing at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon
to tryout for the business depart-
ment of the Gargoyle.
"Experience is not necessary to
tryout for the business staff," he
said, "but activity on such publica-
tions will prove of value."'
During the second semester of
the freshman year and the first se-
mester of the sophomore year, the
tryouts do office work and assist in
the monthly campus sales of the
magazine. The purpose of the try-
out period is to familiarize the stu-
dent with the general working of
the publication, and also to gig
the business manager an oppor-
tunity to select the most promising
tryouts for lower staff positions.
At the beginning of the second
semester of the sophomore year,
if his work has shown merit the
tryout is promoted to the lower
staff. As a lower staffman he spe-
cializes in the work of one of the
departments of the Gargoyle under
the manager of that department.
The various departments are cir-
culation, accounts, local advertis-
ing, national advertising, and pub-
lications.

During his tour, Neutra has ad-
dressed university students, artists
societies, and associations of fel-
low architects and designers in a
large number of cities all over the
world. Other contributions include
two books concerning architecture
in America. He was the American
delegate to the international con-
gress of modern architecture which
met last November in Brussels,
where his report was regarded as
a highlight of the meet.
The lecture today will be illus-
trated by the projection of nu-
merous slides considered significant
in the new world movement which
he is to describe. They havebeen
made from photographs he has
taken personally. The lecture is
open to the public. Neutra is to
begin several building projects a-
broad and in America, he has an-
nounced.
Hekking to Speak.
William M. Hekking, director of
the Albright art gallery in Buffalo,
will lecture on "Modern Art Forms"
at 4:15 o'clock on Tuesday, March
3, in the Natural Science auditor-I
ium.
Students interested in creative
writing and in subsequent publica-
tion will have an opportunity to
hear an address by John Frederick,
editor of the Midland magazine, at
4:15 o'clock Thursday afternoon,
March 4 in the Natural Science au-
ditorium. The subject of the lec-
ture will be "Creative Writing in
College and Subsequent Publica-
tion."

1
i
la
I
,

No arrests have been made in the
two robberies which occurred in
Ann Arbor Monday night, police
said yesterday, although clues are
being constantly sifted.
Both hold-ups were staged at al-
most the same time-11 o'clock. A
lone bandit entered the Alway
drug store at the corner of Wash-
ington street and Fourth avenue
and, after rifling the cash register
of $117.50, fled.
Two bandits confronted John
I P E N S
A N D
P E N C I L S
Ali makes and all prices
A Red Arrow Place

ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

MICHIGAN BELL

r
;;
i

TELEPHONE

CO&

l

0. D. MORRILL
South State St. Phone 6615

314

m

I

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
"FEEMAN'S

i INNG

ROOM

Clean, Pleasant and With Excellent Service
)NLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

jIE

h

I

SCHOOL OF USIC CONCERTS
(No Admission Charge)
_AUL OKKEBERG
Pianist
Sun., arch 1, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
HORCHESTRA
DAVID MATTERN, Conductor
Sun., 'March 15, 4:15, Hill Auditorium
,.ANNS PICK
Violoncellist, and
ALICE ANDERBACH
Accompanist
Sun., March 22, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
WASS LY BESEKIRSKY
Violinist, and
U ABEL ROSS REA
Pianist, in Sonata Recital
un., March 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
JOSEPH BRINKMAN
Pianist
Sun., April 5, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
e T H1EL1A NEWELL
Violonist, and
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist in Sonata Recital
Sun., April 26, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
SCI OL OF MUSIC TRIO

I

IMake a

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f
j :Y
,
,
s
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{ ,
,

1 11

Weekly

ills

_____ _ ___ _ _ ___ _._ _____ ____ ._ _ _ v .
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1 1
4- I
I

Telephone Visit
Back Home

_ T _ _ _._., __ .w ___._
--

'II

I

BANKING
S 'IRENGTH

Mother and Dad would be happy to have you
call them once a week. Many students a'
range a definite time for telephoninig home
each week. Then the folks will be expecting
the call and will be sure to be there.
Long Distance rates are surprisingly low.
You can call the following points from Ann
Arbor and talk for three minutes for the rates
shown (Day Station-to-Station rates).

F
.9
1I

if

1^ 10

1''aiin'ical Illustrations

s 1,1I

11 c
- __,

GROWS WITH
THE YEARS

Sault Ste. Marie

-Y - - - $1.55

i)

I

11

1 1111

m V " I' " -_l-* I TV" -- - " I1

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