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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 23, 1931 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I C H I C A N

L/ A .L L Y

ICHIGAN DAILY

JIAL BULLETIN
constructive notice to all members
red at the office of the Assistant to
'inf S dr~v. 1130 n r fitreo

Y.M.C.A. 'Enriches'
Personality, State
Conference Decides

ALUMNI POINT OUT
VLUE OFr COLLEGE

A NEW YORKER
I atLarg

)1i1%CjVL1g 0U1 3.11:. LJ.U ..IAll. I.)0.urUCy. Discussion at the state officers
training conference held recently
UDAY, MAY 23, 1931 NO. 168 at Patterson lake disclosed the fact
that there is much confusion as to
NOTICES what is the real mission and pur-
pose of the Y. M. C. A.
S AND GRADUATE STUDENTS! Student leaders finally agreed
nain for the payment of diploma feed. There that the main purpose of the Y. M
4 p. in., Wdnesday, May 27. The Treasur- C. A. was to enrich student person-
afternoon. Shirley IV. Smit4, alities and to resist those influences
Vicc-President and Secretary. on the campus which are destruc-
tive.

of Engineering and Architecture: There will be 3a
ty of these Colleges on Monday, May 25, at 4:15
t Engineering building. The purpose of this meet-
representatives to the University Council.
Louis A. Hopkins, secretary.
f Literature, Science and the Arts: A meeting is
ay 25, at 4 p. m., for the purpose of electing the
newly organized University Council. The meeting
225 Angell hall. John R. Effinger.
rs and Student Assistants for Orientation Period,
a meeting of the entire staff on Monday, May 25,
tomance Lang. Philip. E. Bursley, director,
Orientation Period.
cers Graduating in June: Pleasecall at 141 West
for drawing 1, 2, and 3 plates.
ips: Attention is called to the notices 'posted. Can-
to consult Professor Cross, 1011 Angell hall, Tues-
10 a. m., Friday 9,a. m., or Monday at 2 p. m.
Hopwood Plays: On Saturday evening, May 23,'
present in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre the,
>r presentation in connection with the Avery Hop-
na. Tickets, for those desiring to attend, may be
by calling at the Box Office of the Mendelssohn
not be reserved by telephone.
ring the full-length play will be produced: "The
ard Humphreys, '31.
n: You may call for your twenty copies of the
Perry's office in Barbour Gymnasium. Please sign

EXHIBITIONS

paintings by members of the Royal Society of British
r gallery of the Architectural building under the aus-
Arbor Art Association. Open, daily from 9 to 5, Sunday
ntings, West Gallery, Alumni Memorial hall; week days
d Sundays from 1:30 to 5 through Sunday, May 31.
MEETINGS TODAY
(Pleistocene Glaciation): Field trip Saturday morning
entrance of N. S. bldg. Fee $1. Bring Detroit folio.
squad will meet at the League at 1:15 p. m., Saturday.
e accepted as there are only two more drills.
geant Women: Dress rehearsal this afternoon, 2-4:30,
If it rains, the rehearsal will be held in Barbour gym.
Room" Bible Class will meet in the "Upper Room" in
'ening at 7 o'clock. There will be two more meetings
1 University men are cordially invited.
COMING EVENTS
sical Education Major'Students: Instead of the regular
day, May 25, there will be an interclass track meet on
he events are the 50-yd. dash, basketball throw, high
ssive broad jump. Interclass averages will be taken.
uested to be on the field, dressed in gym clothes at

Factors which disorganize stu-
dent life were pointed out and pos-
sible remedies suggested. Essential
needs were listed as adjustment of
religious beliefs. Vocational choice,
social poise and recreation, oppor-
tunities for self expressions in dis-
cussion groups, and normal atti
tude toward sex and financial help
and employment.
ien prominent in vocational
guidance associations outlined fea-
sible student guidance programs.
The fact was' stressed that most
students could be equally successful
in many occupations and that the
main endeavor was to get them
pointed right.
A setting forward of Student
Christian association aims was en-
couraged and the need of sympa-
thetic freshman guidance outlined.
'FIFTEEN INITIATEDO
INTOLASOIT
Banquet Held by Coif to Honor
New Members; Dean Bates
Is Toastmaster.
(Continued from Page 1)
Need for lawyer leadership in the
various civic and social movements.
of the nation is immediate, he con-
tinued, adding that "every lawyer
should take an active part in such
movement ...
Unemployment, he said, is a
problem that challenges not only
social workers but the best brains
of the bar in endeavoring to formu-
late laws and work out organiza-
tions which will handle the situa-
tion intelligently, alleviate the dis-
tress, and do something to prevent
a repetition." Social legislation also
offers leadership, he added.
In concluding his address, Gen-
eral MacChesney said that the con-
fidence of the public in the bar
and its members is "a sacred trust,
to be preserved by all of us in the
public interest. The people of this
country can look nowhere else for
the necessary leadership."
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the law
school, was toastmaster. Other talks
were given by Prof. John B. Waite,
of the law school, and John S.
Tennant, who spoke for the new-
comers.
The new members of Coif, all in
this year's senior class, who were
initiated before the banquet, are
William Warner Bishop, jr., William
Marshall Emery, Robert Edmund
Finch, Florence KoenigsbEitg Frank-
el, Hugh Alfred Fulton Samuel Eu-
gene Gawne, Mark Henry Harring-
ton, Virgil Davis Parish, Benjamin
L. Pierce, William Charles Pusch,
Maxwell Leon Rubin, James Har-
land Spencer, John Selden Tennant,
Jacques Loeb Weiner, and Lewis
Desmont Wilson.
Dental School Treats
3,300; Sets New Mark
Patients treated at the University
School of Dentistry have numbered
about 3,300 since the beginning of
the school year, a new record for
that institution, Vera Wallington,
secretary to the dean, said yester-
day.
The clinic is opened to anyone,
the only charges made are those
covering the costs of materials
used. This fall the school took over
the dental section of the Health
Service, and University students
may obtain service free of charge.

Speakers Approve University's
System of Teaching
at Triennial.
(Continued from Page 1)
of practica wor is made for stu-
dents in professional schools, why
should it not be made for faculty?
..Contact with men who have
felt the severity of the economic
struggle would suggest- more em-
phasis on practical as well as theo-
retical training."
Referring to the narrowness of
a technical education of which
Kniskern spoke, Trout said, "Eco-
nomics would have been recreation
compared with certain courses sucn
as hydraulics and thermodynamics.
Yet, later there were times when
years of technical training had to
be completely discarded for lack
of economic approach and fail'ure
to find economic opportunity."
Trout pointed out that the Alum-
ni University plan is a great for-
ward step in overcoming this de-
ficiency for those who have already
graduated.
Bonistee Answers Criticisms.
Roscoe 0. Bonisteel, Ann Arbor
Lawyer and graduate of the Law
school, in his address to the meet-
ing answered some of the criticisms
which have been directed against
the Law school. He met the' criti-
cismn that graduates of other
schools are better prepared to be-
gin routine work directly upon
their graduation, with the answer
that Michigan graduates are better
founded in the fundamentals of
the profession and they can quickly
pick up the routine details.
As for the criticism that many
courses are taught by the case
book method instead of the lecture
and text book system, Bonisteel re-
plied that, "...the majority of law-
yers and teachers of law believe
that the case book methd coupled
with a free discussion of the ques-
tion involved is better."
Letters Read.
Those who were unable to at-
tend the meeting were asked to
send letters which were read at the
meeting. H. Earl Hoover, '12E, vice-
president of the Hoover Suction
Sweeper company, named under
the benefits which he had received,
the contact with the large group
of people which go to make up the
University, the demands of the
University for continous and per-
sistent work requiring the forma-"
tion of habits which persist for all
time, and the advantage derived
from the extra or social activities.
In answer to the question as to
what he failed to acquire, Hoover
named the ability to stand on his
feet before a large audience with-
out inward quaking, and his failure
to build up his health as he should
have done.
Sociologist In Capital
for Dry Law Meeting
Prof. R. D. McKenzie, of the soci-
ology department, has been called
to Washington to attend the' first
meeting of the Bureau of Prohibi-
tion Advisory Research council,
Tuesday, May 26.
The council is composed of grad-
uate students and p r o f e s s o r s
throughout the country who have
been appointed by Amos W. Wood-
cock of the department of interior
to carry out research work for the
prohibition bureau.
HURRY
or this $300 credit of New Essex.
Will sell for $200. I

By Mark Barron
NEW YORK, May 23.-Personal
notes off a New Yorker's cuff:
One of the town's major clubs is
practically bankrupt, due to inabil-
ity of members to pay back dues.
They do retain the tickers which
bring stock market and race track
information, and watching t h e
tickers in the main occupation of
many members.
In an effort to increase their slim
bankrolls a group of these club
members are playing the races.-
Each donates 50 cents until they
get $5, and this is wagered on a
pony.
RObert E. Sherwood is the town's'
tallest author, also one of literati's
best comics.
All humor writers are not so
funny in public. For instance, this
little bon mot staged by Donald
Ogden Stewart in a club the other3
night:
"I want all of, you ' o wish ,mef
good luck," Stewart said, "I'm cele-
brating my birthday."
"Oh, is today your birthday?" a
friend inquired.
"No, it's not until October 23,"
Stewart answered, "but I'm cele-
brating it tonight. Haw, haw, haw!"
,That gives you an idea of whale
we have to listen to, if you should
have gotten the idea that ours is a
soft job. We just die laughing at
witticisms like that all the time.
Next week: the padded cell.

prevent guests from taking the
paint off the walls. He never knows
whether they are trying to steal.
the beer or the valuable gold leaf.
This is still an honest city. The
other day we forgot our topcoat in
an obscure Bronx drugstore. By the
time we had reached our hotel the
manager was on the phone to say
he was sending it to us by his mes-
senger.
John McGraw is not only an ex-
pert baseball manager and picker
of race horses. He also is an ex-
cellent copy reader and often helps
edit the copy of a sports weekly in
which he has an interest.
Our surpressed desire is to attach.
a taxi meter to our car and keep
the meter running all the time.
Imagine running up a $500 taxi
fare and not having to pay the bill.
The Court House club, with only
seven members, is probably thel
most exclusive club around. Mar-
shall Field and six other squash,
and racquet fiends are its organiz-
ers.

PERSONAL
William 5eaorook has sailed for
Paris, but he'll find no voodoo there.
Maybe vo-do-de-o-do, but not voo-
doo.
Willard Mack and Peter B. Kyne
own large racing stables. Mack's is
the feature of Tia Juana.
Emil Jannings won't come back
to this country to appear in talking
pictures.
Great Neck commuters jam the
smoking car of the 9:07 every morn-
ing. Charles and Dennis King har-
monize for their entertainment all.
the way to Penn station.
Eugene Powers, actor, is an au-
thority on bridge, as is Claiborne
Foster.
PUZZLE
Mr. and Mrs. Coburn have a stu-
dio above the National Arts\ club.
The walls are painted with a mix-
ture of gold leaf ad beer. Mr. Co-
burn says he is much put to it to

SATURDAY
DOLLAR
BOX
One Dozen Long
Roses
$100
ANN ARBOR
FLORISTS, INC.
122 East Liberty
Phone 6215

IN
SE

a

wrderS executed en .3
s hanges. Accounts cat
Iem* enservatlvo morg

II

Tlrophone 23271

TRUST BLDG.
LnOO

Lydia MENDELSSOI
Gala Opening Monday
MAT. WED. AND SAT
ROBERT HENDERSON HAS THE HON
ANCH EIn
With MARTHA GRAHAM'FANE
MARTHA NE
Thurs. Mat., May 28, 3:15-Martha Graham
BOX OFFICE NOW C
SELL OUT PRICES: Nights 75c, $1.0'0, an
75c, and $1.00. Season Tickets, all six pla
Always 200 good seats at 75c' for at

11

T UNG OIL BAN QU
WILL HEAR COOL
Dean Emeritus of Engince
School Will Attend Fete
Dr. Mortimer E. Cooley,
emeritus of the College of E
neering and Architecture wil
turn to Ann Arbor early next'
in order to be present for the Si
Rho Tau annual Tung Oil
quet which will be held at
union Wednesday evening. At f
ent Dr. Cooley is in Cananda:
New York.
In addition to Dr. Cooley at
banquet, there will be many fa
ty celebrities and student lea
present. Dean Herbert C. Sadl
the colleges of engineering
architecture, Assigtant Dean F
Lovell, Prof. HenryC. Andes
Prof. Henry H. Higbie, Prof.
W. Pawlowski, and Prof. Ferdir
N. Menefee. Prof. A. D. Moore
be toastmaster.
At the banquet the famous ci
of tung oil leaves will be awa
to the most loquacious speake
the evening.

D

DANCING

HE F

Illini Serenaders

ItI

MASONIC
TEMPLE

May 22 and
$1."00

23

A Beautiful Gift
A Lasting Gift
A Gift that will keep you in
lasting memory because
A MERRICK
HEIRLOOM
HANDMADE
CHINESE RUG

'!

R.,C. A.Vici
SU perette

The Annual Banquet will b'e postponed.
e 1. Full announcements will be mailed.

The date setI

Club will meet in Lane hall at 2:15 on Sunday; election
next fall will take place.
olunteer Group: Outdoor meeting in Arboretum; meeC at
ntrance at 8 a. m. on Sunday. In case of rainy or cold
at Harris hall at 8:30. You are cordially invited.
r Room" Forum will meet Sunday morning at 9:30.
11: There will be no supper at the Hall Sunday evening.
. be entertained at the home of Mr. T. R. Peirsol, 625 Ox-
d of South University), for a picnic supper. A group will
at six o'clock, and those for whom it is more convenient
ct.
udent's Union, Sunday evening, Neil Staebler will lead a
"The Depression." Unitarian Church.

is
A GIFT THAT BRINGS PRIDE
OF POSSESSION.
A GIFT WITHIN Y9UR
PURSE POSSIBILITIES.
You need feel no obligation in
coming to see MERRICK RUGS
at
928 Church Street

CHAS. DOUKAS
1319 South Uniiersity

I

ii

ILt

!II

0
=====

The Maynard

We have,
wonderful new.

received a sizeable shipment of these
R. C. A. Victor Radios.

e

y Returns ip
e 'rical Mee ' or *******"I

nin F. Bailey, of the
ineering department
rday from a trip to
irginia, where he at-
ting of the National
aufacturers Associa-?
he is a member.
is chairman of the
noise measurement.

Today
This coupon and 49c entitles the bearer to a package of 10 MAC
Blades for Gillette, Auto Strop, Everready or Gem Razors. Limit, 2 pack-
ages to a customer. Why pay 50c for 5 blades when you can buy 10
for 49c? Sold with a money back guarantee by

Spaghetti and
Sa ndwich Shop
308 MAYNARD STREET
Announces Its Formal Opening

A full tone, full powered Screen
Heterodyne with tone color control.

Grid, Super.

$69 50
Complete with Radiotrons

BACKED BY TWO FAMOUS TRADEMA

EDSILL DRUG STORE
208 South Main Street

SATURDAY, MAY 23

R C A.

VICTC

vial Sale 1-4 off
MICHIGAN BANNERS, BLANKETS,
PENNANTS and PILLOWS-

Specializing in Genuine Italian Spaghetti
Home Cooked 'Steaks, Chops
ALL KINDS OF KOSHER MEAT SANDWICHES
COLD MEAT PLATE DINNERS
-3 - . '

We cordially invite you to come in to our stor
and inspect this radio.
A FREE DEMONSTRATION WILL BE GIVEN

11.,... ... :a.. ..+ : 11

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