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May 22, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

'S

a . . s. a a..U.. . ,.

i- I

Asso-
led to

entrance examinations for the Uni-
versity. This would make small
communities realize that their edu-
cation facilities must be improved
and it would also prevent students
from entering until they were pre-
pared for college work. This would
certainly be more advantageous
than to have them struggle throughn
their first two years obtaining less
than a C average, and at the end
of that time return home, blaming
themselves instead of their pre-
college training.

Music and Drama

ar
ter

Complete Line of Everything Musical

4.50.

AMERICAN ARTISTS
A Review by Cile Miller
Representative of many of the
current tendencies in American
art, the Exhibition of American.
paintings sponsored by the College
Art association, is interesting be-
causeof the directly opposing types
of work which it presents. Although
the current show exhibits many of
the works of the same artists that
were shown in the National exhibit
which recently closed in Detroit,
and although much of the work of
these same artists is of inferior
grade to that which was shown in
the Detroit show, this present ex-
hibtion gives a broader cross sec-
tion of the country's artistic en-
deavors.

THE "ELECTRA" CAST
The supporting cast of "Electra"
which is to open here Monday night
in the Mendelssohn Theatre after
its one-night s t o p s in Boston,
Princeton, Toledo, and Detroit in-
cludes several prominent actors,

1

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- SIDS PLACE -
Opposite Schlenker's Hardware
220 West Liberty
Lawn Mower
Repair Service =
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Unexcelled Baldwin Pianos
Victor Micro-Synchronous Radio
Victor and Brunswick Records
Music Teacher's Supplies
Popular Music

-

UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music

I

iurney Williams
Jalter W. Wilds
arold 0. Warren
seph A. Russell
ary L Behmyer
NVin. J.1.Gormnan
tram J. Askwith
arles R. Sprowl
;orge A. Stauter
. W m. E. Pyper

Campus Op inion
Contributors are 'asked to be brief,
confining themsel estoeless tha.b 30
words if possible. Anonymous com-
mnunications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.

F
R
P
p
in
ti

*Sprowl
ATobin
Warren

s Assistants
J. Cullen Kennedy

eet

E. Rosenthal
[; A. Staunter
W.Thomas
S. Towwwrlnd

MICHIGANENSIAN
THE WHITE ELEPHANT
Lo and behold, the Michiganen-
sian staff comes forth with a white
elephant!
Don't worry. frosh, the printer
just forgot to put on all the cover.
That will be taken care of next
year, however. All you have to do
'is wrap your book in tissue paper,
save it until next year and then
take it back to the 'Ensian office
to have it finished. It will -be done
absolutely free, which means a lot
if you are Scotch. You -are going
to get something for nothing. Of
course no one would dare intimate
that you got nothing for something
this time. Oh no! Because you really
didn't. Just look at what you got.
There is all of that beautiful can-
vas, white as a lily, and with the
green leaves, too. But who wants a
lily? That comes soon enough any-
Iway.

FF
4
isirleas Manager
ssistant Manager

les T. Kline
as MT. Davis
W. Warboys
J. Johnson
Williamson
S. 1obacker
nas S. Muir
ry .. Knan

eier

it Wiese

DAY, MAY 22, 1931
tor -FRANK GILBRETHt
MARY PREPARATIOII
he adoption of the new
plan to divide classes in
rsity into two groups or
arently a certainty, it be-
essary for University offi-
educators throughout the
consider once more the
of more stringent re-
s for. entrance into the
w plan will provide for a
ducation in the freshman
omore years. After com-
1 of the necessary courses
oup, a student can then
more advanced and spe-
udy during his junior and
ars, providing that he has
an average of C or better
s first two years. If he has
low this average he will
lowed to start upon the
.rt of his education.
an is a decided step for-
the University in that it
out, after two years, many
uidents who have not the
the ambition to do college
ifortunately, however, it
weed out many who have
these qualifications, but
not had adequate high
.d grammar school train-
plan that the University
ide can, without entrance
nts, eleminate this prob-]

And canvas, you know the poten-
tialities of canvas. In one city it
may be used for sailor's leggings,
or in another, made into oat bags
for horses. Or a Raphael may trans-
form its whole texture until it al-
most lives and breathes. How about
a couple of Raphaels stationedbout
on the diagonal to touch up the
covers a bit for the disppointed
students? Won't the money saved
on the cover pay for that, too? Or
just how much was saved in that
manner? If none, then methinks
the staff had a pretty fast one
pulled on it.BiBut then there is all
the work attadhed to the cover.
Canvas as a material would be
rather hard to work and the addi-
tion of a separate piece along the
back wouldn't simplify things. Be-
sides, the velvety just inside the
cover would try to creep and fold
up like an accordion even before it
was put on the books.
The printer can't receive all the
blame, however. It is the fault of
one of those 'Ensian tryouts who
always had a hankering for white
canvas, white canvas sails like his
grandpappy used to tell him about.
Some one is going to ride out the
stormy gale before the menory of
those grimy, dirty 'Ensians, though
once white, grows shady. like the
'Ensians themselves are growing
with a little handling.
You were lucky if yours wasn't
already soiled when the wrapper
was removed. There might be one
good use for all of that white, how-
ever; possibly in detective agencies
for recording finger prints. When a
record is made some clear lacquer
could be poured over it to preserve
the delicate lines.
That lacquer idea is really great.
Why can't each student march
down town and swap a couple of
dimes for a can of it, along with a
new brush, paint it carefully over
the sailor's leggings part of his
book and when it is dry carry it
home satisfied that he can wash it
off when it needs it. No fooling, that
would be great. Even so-called clea
lacquer would leave it tinged a
little, about the shade of an oil-
soaked cloth, no fear from oil here
of course. A little skill with colors
might result in something really
distinctive, not that it isn't already
distinctive you know, just like you
home telephone directory.
When you go home and set you
'Ensian up by the side of those yo
already have it is going to stand
out among the others all right
stand out about like a butcher's
supply catalog on -the shelf witl
Tolstoy's War and Peace, or A Mid-
summer Night's Dreaih. That drean
part is significant. It's a dream a
over the outside----a bad dream. No
let's make it a nightmare.
Once inside, the cenery is quite
changed. There are some things
about it for which the editors ar

An .almost academic savour ofc
the older schools stands in con-t
trast to a bold exposition of mere
mass molding, numerous innova-(
tions in original technique standa
out in opposition to the usual con- N
ventions of, expression. But in spitev
of this wide variance in the type1
of work represented, there is an
impressive and peculiar unity with-n
in the show brought about by ai
boldness of conception which isk
characteristic of all the artists rep-1
resented. Even the pieces whicha
are most completely saturated witht
imaginative interpretation, are ex-
ecuted with the same daringly con-
fident attack. Pictures which rep-
resent pure fantasy are delineated
with the same clear, cold realismr
as those which represent the actu-
ality of a still life subject.
Luigi Lgcioni's Anachronisms is
one of the most vivid expositions1
of form which has appeared in any,
of the exhibits held here this year.
It stands out as an exquisite crea-
tion of interwoven planes and vary-
ing surfaces. The artist's mastery
of texture distinction is remarka-
ble. A' modernistic stepped book
shelf with its highly veneered sur-
face, a vase, a bottle, and glass all
modelled to a perfect sense of
roundness, a small studio model
perched at a saucy angle before a
nude sketch -all of these things
are arranged in a completely uni-
fied composition. And not only
does the artist manage to repre-
sent the varying surface textures
with an unerring accuracy, but he
also developes these distinctions in
a very high pitch of color tone.
George Inness contributes Land-
scape, a canvass which reproduces
a rather vague and uncertain land-
scape into a vividly 'certain and
unified creation. .The peculia in-
terest of this canvass lies in the
clever focus of attention which the
artist fixes in the center of the pic-
ture, by a crescendo of color and
line emphasis. And he manages to
do this through a combination of
almost somber colors varying in
shade through all o the grey
greens to an accent of watery yel-
low. The .canvass is in harmony
with the man's tradition of the
romantic tendency.
Under the Cocoanut Tree by
Winslow Homer is an excellent ex-
ample of the artist's freedom of
brush work in the use of water
color medium. As usual he is de-
pendent for much of his appeal on
the choice of his subject matter,
in that much of the meaning of his
contribution is centered in the in-
terpretation of the scene repre-
sented rather than through any
pure abstraction of line and form
harmony. The wide brush strokes
with which he slashes out his pic-
tures creates a roundness which is
surprising in an artit who uses
color for modelling distinctions
rather than highlight contrast.

Foremost among them is Doris'
Rich, actress of many New York
>roductions, who is to play the
part of Clytaemnestra, Electra's
nother. Miss Rich's dramatic ex-
perience has ranged from an ap-
pearance in the first production of
"Broadway" to membership in the
Shakesperean repertory of E. H.
Sothern and Julia Marlowe. Re-
cently she has appeared with -Wal-
ter Hampden in his "Caponsacchi."
In the chorus of Theban women
led by the dancer Martha Graham
are such players as Dorothy Scott,
Vivienne Giesen and Anne Iin-
wood. Miss Scott has been the
leader of the chorus in the several
productions of "Electra" w h i ch
Margaret Anglin has done in Cal-
ifornia. Vivienne Giesen is best
known throughout the country for
her work as the Nun in "The Mir-
acle. Doris Dalton is a young ac-
tress who created great interest this
spring with her \performance of
Alethea in the recent revival of
Wycherley's "The Country Wife."

BROWN-CRESS
a C o m p a n y , tI n .V S M N
I N V E ST MEN T
SECURtIIES
Orders executed on al ox.
changes. Accounts rried
em sonservative margin.

Teephone 23271

A-- -ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
1st FLOOR
-~

A BOWL of Kellogg's Corn
Flakes an'd milk makes a
wonderful late snack. Deli-
cious.Refreshing. And so easy
to digest, it promotes health-
ful sleep. Order it at the
campus restaurant tonight!
CORN FLAKES

bedtime

:!!.

BIRD- BATHS

l
H. M. S. PINAFORE: or The Lass
That Loved A Sailor: a nautical
comic opera in two acts by W. S.
Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan: the
Rupert D'Oyly Carte Opera Com-
pany under the direction of Mal-
colm Sargent: the Victor Master-
piece Series.
Victor continues its issues of the
masterpieces of Light Opera ,,this
month vith H. M. S. Pinafore. This
particular operetta needs no com-
ment. The silliness of that marvel-
lous refrain "and so do his sisters
and his cousins and his aunts" all
agree is heaven-sent. There is no
more typical line in all Victorian
literature than when Buttercup,
tenderly solicitous for the Cap-
tain's woe says in cadenced recita-
tive: "Confide in me-fear not-
I am a mother!" Then there is a
typical Gilbertian stroke in the en-
gaging frankness with which Sir'
Joseph Porter tells the way to the
Admiralty. And so on. Sullivan, of
course, matched Gilbert at every
point with buoyant tunes,. gayly
catching the conversational inflec-
tions of the buoyant c escendoes of
rhymes and metrical funning. The
nautical operetta is joyously liber-
ating. The D'Oyly Carte perfor-
mance, as previously, is just about
flawless.

A garden isn't complete
without one.
We have a new and
complete line.
Michigan, Flower
Growers

suggestion

The most popular
cereals served in the
dining-rooms of Ameri-
can colleges, eating
clubs and fraternities
are made by Kellogg in
Battle Creek. They in-
clude ALL-BRAN, PEP
Bran Flakes, Rice Kris-
pies, Wheat Krumbles,
and Kellogg's WHOLE
WHEAT Biscuit. Also
Kaffee Hag Coffee--the
coffee that Iets, you
sleep. to

4
as
CORN
FLAKES
KE

1026 Maiden Lane
Phone 21715

LEZ

0

601 East William

i. f

Vacation
Positions!

IthatEXTRA someth ng

. 0 0

Phone 7515

A large, nationally known sport-
ing equipment concern is seeking
a number of ,college men and
women to fill well-paying vacation
positions. You will be able to earn
big money this summer. Your
hours are your own, you may se-
lect your own territory, no ex-
perience necessary. Your friends
in your city, at your golf club,
in your own set will help you earn
large salaries. For information
simply drop a line to
National Golf Ball Co.
1513-15 Milwaukee Avenue
Chicago, Illinois

I"

* i ..,.

CLICQUOT

ha sit !

EVEN a man who's being
penalized for holding can
summon a lotg, long cheer for
the mellower, smoother flavor
of this fine old ginger ale. It
blends with lively spirits . .
adds gaiety to the best of
parties.

tatistics show that a large ma-
ty of the failures in the Uni-
sity during the freshman and
homore years are received by
duates of the small high schools
the state. These institutions are
.ally maintained by small com-
nities who have not the money
supply adequate school or teach-
facilities. Often one teacher has
,rge of all classes in junior high
I high schools. Even a most cap-
e student, graduating from such
institution, woud have difficulty
competing with a graduate of
of the larger, modern high
ools that are located in the
es.
t has been suggested by noted'
ocators in the state that groups
these small communities 'pool
ir funds to have larger centrally
ated schools; but in almost every
e local pride has rebelled at the

3
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s
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s

Eugene Speicher appears too,
with a large canvass, Lydia at the
Table, which has the usual sense
of distinction between surfaces and
the suggestive understanding of the.
anatomy rf draped figures which is
characteristic of his work. But the
expression of the face veers over to
the caricaturistic interpretation of
a dreamy staring girl rather than
the usual sympathetic treatment.
Childe Hassam is represented by
a landscape oil of the sea which is
drenched in the characteristic Has-
sam sunlight effects, and has the
added interest of an unusual use of'
color variations. George Luks shows
another of his wistfully awkward
children in a large canvass, Danty.
Of those who are experimenting
with modes of expression is Edward
Bibermann who strikes out boldly
in single tones of only three pure
colors and build' in mass form a
nude figure that is significant more
for its abstraction of composition
than for its realistic interpretation.

Screen Reflections
CURRENTLY
Wuerth
Ben Lyon dons his doughboy cap
last seen in "Hell's Angel's" for a
less dramatic and assumedly more
comical film titled
"A Soldier's Play-
thing." Vina Del-
mar, "Kept Wom-
an" a n d "Bad
Girl" wrote the'
story, while Har-
ry Langdon, with
Jean Hersholt and
Noah Beery sup-
port Mr. Lyon.
The Wuerth will
also show chapter N LY ON
Indians Are Coming." To arms, to
arms!
Michigan
"Trader Horn" concludes its week
run at the Liberty Street cinema
palace tomorrow night. Despite a
none-too-convincing skeleton plot,
the picture should not be missed for
its authentic picturization of Afri-
can life. Direction and photography
are excellent, accompanied by ac-
tion that is as thrilling as any
melodrama. A-.
Majestic
"Captain Thunder" closes tonight
at the Majestic, followed tomorrow
by Montgomery, Edwards, Jordan
& Co., in "Shipmates." The current
feature stars Victor Varconi land
Fay Wray, with Eddie Buzzell, Glenn
Tryon, and our dear Rudolph Val-
ley on short subjects.
Due East
Johnny of the American Barry-

Mac's Taxi'
35c Anywhere in
City.
10c for each addi-
tional passenger.

Phone 4289

We Solicit Your
Patronage

For Your

Dancin Parties

and Social

Functions

Del Deibridg'e d Ray Gorrell

s ... -,,... . . ,*,'-,,,I*

UE OT CLUB
GINGER ALES
ale grg- codena - cc
lree iavorite lavor's on any Campus

Present;

_I

Detroit's Finest Organized Dance Orchestras

DEL DELBRIDGE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
RAY GORRELL AND HIS ORCHESTRA
BERT MILAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
DICK BOWEN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
HY STEED AND HIS COMMODORES
BENNY KYTE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
MYRON SCHULTZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA
ERNIE ZOOPER AND HIS ARABIAN KNIGHTS
FREDDIE ZIERER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
THE KEYSTONE SERENADERS "BERNIE CHALK" DIRECTOR
HENRY "HANK" FOMISH AND HIS ORCHESTRA
THE DETROITERS
THE RYTHM KINGS
BILLY MINOR AND HIS MELODIANS
%TTT'T9 T Th m ' r-T T1,-Avr. -a n .- u-1i 7n T

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