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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

!TRE MICHICAN DATEV

FRIDAY,

" i 1 1 M1 C A 4T AAN.RY 1 LwYa+'.R w u

Colve Problem
Coalition
eans.

UNITED STATES PLANES SHOWN IN BATTLE ORDER
FLYING OVER DAYTON IN NATIONAL AIR MANEUVERS

EDLO.GY STUDENTS

FORD PLANTATION TO HELP BRA
IN REGAINING WORLD RUBBE,

D

j.C.
CC./. C. '9"-.> xC. .,oaks. C..
.?Jr::: ~.'" '. ' . rod

t'.

Field Trip
Relics

Section
on Farm
Dexter.

Discovers
Near

to Meet'
ion.;

21.-(P)--,Ameri-
-time air force
ay to "protect"
advance east-
a hypothetical
it out with the
n of E.uropean
on skyscrapers
the police were
s to handle the
ago gazed sky-
ivers of the ar-
r planes. The

Bones of an Indian woman were
found recently by members of a
geology field tripiv ig i
near Dexter, Dr. W. T3. Hirudale,
custodian of Michigan archeology
at the University museums, revealed
yesterday.
The incomplete bones were found:
on a farm belonging to Frederick
Ewald and were dug up by Albert
Crisman, who had been removing
gravel in order to fix a road. Un-
aware of their educational value,
Crisman made a clumsy operation
of the removal and they have been
badly damaged.
Dr. Hinsdale brought the skeleton
into Ann Arbor, where it is now
kept at the University museums.
According to Dr. Hinsdale, the
careless handling of the remains
removed all possibilities of identify-
ing the skeleton with any period.
Nothing was found with the body
to help identify it, such as pottery,
bead work, iron, or steel.
With the exception of a diseased
jaw, the body was in good condition.
It had an unusual skull, in that it
contained four wormian bones.
Wormian bones, Dr. Hinsdale ex-
plained, were those surrounded by
sutures. Four is the maximum num-
ber for human skulls, and this was
an unusual occurence.
The stature of the woman could
not have been high, Dr. Hinsdale
claimed. In comparison with skel-
etal remains of other bodies, the
Indian was at least six inches
smaller than average.,She was
described as middle aged, as fore-
told by the worn condition of her
teeth.
'Idaho Supreme Court

Must Clear 1,000 Acres Yearlyt
According to Termsf
of Grant.
By David J. Wilkie
DETROIT, May 2l.-(/P)-Back in
the early '70s a young Englishman,
Henry Wickham, came out of the
Brazilian interior at Para carrying[
a glass case which he said contain-
ed seeds for the garden of her ma-
jesty, Queen Victoria.,
As the queen's messenger, he was
permitted to hasten aboard his
ship without inspection. Wickham
told the truth when he said he had
seeds for her majesty's gardens. He
did not say, however, that they
were Tubber seeds and that some
of her majesty's gardens were in
British tropical possessions.
It was a smuggling Teat without'
p,, rallel in history. From it grew'
the great British monopoly in rub-
ber. It cost Brazil her sole control
o'j ie world's rubber output. It
won for Wickham a knighthood.
It is in an effort to win back for
Brazil the lost dominance of the
world's rubber market that Henry
Ford has begun, in almost the iden-
I tical region where Wickham gath-
ered the seeds that sprouted into'
the British monopoly, intensive cul-
tivation of a huge rubber planta-
Ition.

cultivation. Under the terms of the
grant at least 1,000 acres must be
cleared and cultivated each year.
Mort of the land was dense Jun-
gle, sometimes called the "Inferno
Verde," or Geen Hell, of the Ama-
zon valley.
Prior to the clearing work expe-
ditions were sent into the jungle
to gather seeds of the heavy-bear-
ing rubber trees. These were brought
back and placed in nurseries.
Since the work began in 1928,
140,000 seed-lings have- been actually
set out, and upwards of 200,000
;ecdlings have been developed in
readiness for planting as additional
acreage becomes ready.

slye
Navy Will Prepare 20
to Fly New Dirigibles
WASHINGTON, May 21.-(,P)-'
Building up trained personnel for
two new dirigibles, the -navy has
ordered 20 officers to the July 1
class in lighter-than-air schooling
at the naval air station, Lakehurst,
N. J..
Five of the officers were added
to the school list after congress ap-
propriated funds to carry on con-
struction of the second new rigid,
ZRS-5. The ZRS-4, or Akron, will
be completed in midsummer.
The navy has also issued a call
for applications by warrant officers,
because of the ZRS-5 appropria-
tion, to take a modified lighter-
than-air course to fit them for duty
on board airships.
This additional 'detail will be
made up of one boatswain, one
gunner, and a machinist.

'orce.
European
d by planes,
orth Acmeri-

I

d in tne
g exer-,
ar" was

A group of army planes is shown here flying in battle formation over Dayton, Ohio, during maneuv-
ers in which the nation's concentiated air forces, compedeti of more than 650 planes, participated. Below
a plane is shown laying a smoke screen over the flying field.

Clear 1,000: Acres Yearly.
On the Tapajos river, deep in the
Amazon valley, this plantation is'
well under way. Out of a 4,500,000-
acre grant obtained from the Bra-
zilian government, the Ford inter-
ests in three years have cleared
some 3,50J acres and have it under;

rig siuatin, brig.
lois, comnmander of
first air division,
for the ulanes to
hicago to Dayton,l
i to New York "in;
combat operations

Work in Ultra Short
Waves Reveals New,
Transmission Fields

r for'the start was 9:0
formation over the weE
west suburbs, followed b
down the shore line e
iigan, past a reviewin
downtown Chicago, con
r toward -Gary, Ind., an
ter holding combat man
r the navy pier.
ieuvers Successfidl-
g. Gen. Foulois and Ma.
s E. Fechet, chief of ti
corps, were happy ov
s of the first large move
ie huge fleet Wednesda
eland and from DaytOi
hem came in formatio
was not a single serioi
mar their flights.
n. Foulois, speaking ove
described the mobiliza
1 experinent to test th
of the air units undE
approximating thosec

5

st LONDON, May 21.-(IP)-_' ltra-
y short wave transmission, developed
'f by .engineers of the International
Lg Telephone and Telegraph company
- and Le Materiel Telephonique of
d Fairis, seems to open up a whole
- new field for radio exploration and
use.
' The laboratories are perfecting
transmitters and receivers operat-
Sing on a wave length of 18 centi-
er meters and recently have demon-
- stiated its practicibility for tele-
y phony, telegraphy and white fac-
n. simile transmission.
n,
as Where their experience may lead!
the company can't foretell,.
or "Frankly, there is a: lot about it
a- that we don't know yet," says G. H.
7e Nash, I. T. and T. executive vice-
er president in charge of the work.
of Can )hold Conversations.
Or It is now possible, however, to
Ld carry on normal conversations, just
h as by telephone, over a 50-mile
d. span in a straight line. By means
n of what may be called mirrors the
d rays 'can be diverted at angles,
n making it possible to "talk around'
5- a corner." The earth's curvature
puts a limit of 50 miles on single
- transmitters, although a way may-
be found to overcome -this difficul-
- t .

CAMP DIRECTORS
WILLHOLD TEA.
Charlevoix Dramatics Group to
Give Reception.
Menbers of the staff of the Lake
Charlevoix Dramatics camp, to be
directed by Prof. Earl E. Fleisch-
man, of the speech department, will
hold a reception and tea from 5 to
6 o'clock Sunday afternoon in the
Grand Rapids room of the League.
The reception, which is mainly for
those interested in the camp, will
be open, to the public.
After the reception a program
will be given consisting of music by
the Dramatics camp's orchestra, a
skit by members of the camp staff,l
and an exhibition of choral reading
by advanced students in Professor
Fleischman's interpretation classes.
A presentation and explanation of
the plans for the club building at
the cainp will be made by Lewis
Stevens, '33A, the designer of the
building.
Poor Children to Use ;
State Park Facilities
LANSING, May 21.-(PA)- Every]
possible facility of Michigan's state'
parks system will be placed at the
disposal of under-privileged chil-
dren of the state, the conservation
commission authorized at its May
meeting.
The parks division of the state
department of conservation has
ben instructed to communicate
with city boards of education or
other child organizations wishing
recreational facilities for the under-

ER AnTS7' C DUP
Ibiut :Il~ i;;.,

TODAY-"CAPTAIN THUNDER"

Home Defense League Votes
Confidence in Proponent
of Sales Tax Bill.

,- - .- ,~ .. , v .. , .

Its

I

t was also a test
tn e if thev co

fo

LANSING, May 21.-(/P)-C. V.
Fenner, whose activities on behalf
of a retail sales tax attracted wide
attention when he wrote Gov. Wil-
ber M. Brucker offering to contrib-
ute $10,000 to his campaign fund
if he would support the measure,
was elevated to the presidency of
the Home Defense league at a meet-
ing here Wednesday. The league
sponsored the sale tax, which was
designed to hit chain stores. Fenner
previously was secretary.
The delegates to the league meet-
ing, composed principally of retail
merchants, adopted a resolution ex-
pressing confidence in Fenner. It
declared that the letter written by'
Fenner to the governor, save the
paragraph referring to the contri-
bution, expressed the "sentiment
and thought of the league.
"We enthusiastically support
Fenner, and unreservedly condemn
the efforts made through this in-
cident to discredit Fenner and
through adverse publicity to defeat
the retail sales tax," the resolution
said. 1
After the meeting Fenner an-'
nounced the league will carry its
fight to the people. He said $10,000
has been voted for a campaign of,
advertising and education to bring
about the adoption of a sales tax'
through initiation. He added that
the league will work for old age
pensions, unemployment insurance
and a state "fair trade" commis-
sionA
WUERTH

UpholdsSterilization
BOISE, Idaho, May 21.-(IP)-The
state supreme court today had held
the Idaho sterilization law consti-
tutional.'
The decision was handed down in
the case of the state against Al-
bert Troutman, an inmate of the
Nampa School and colony for the
insane. Officials said the law would
be brought into operation on sev-
eral score inmates of the peniten-
tiary.

..T

SATURDAY)

NEW STAR!

I

You

The

THROUGH SAVAGE
AFRICA
To the rescue of Nina, White
Goddess of the Blacks. Wild ani-
mals impede their progress. Leop-
ard and hyena in death grapple.

Liked

-J

Screen's
Newest

I

,caitEWITH ':PfRFC1' .

DAILY
AT
2:00
3:40
7:00
9:00

Him in
"Strange:

and

ble to them i
clal airplane bus

May
Kiss"
Now

Most

I

Popular
Star

I

a's Going on

See
His

I

THEATRES
chigan-Duncan Reanaldo and
aa Booth in "Trader Horn."
tjesflc-Fay Wray and Victor
Mi in Captain thunder'."
irrth-Harry LangdonandBen
. in "A Soldier's Plaything."
CENERAL
cture-."The University Thea-
4k, Natural Sciencekauditorum.
rNUtT PLANNED
R AIDOF CAMP"
ms have b1On completed for
annual Camp Birke t prospect
er which will be given at 6-:30
ck Friday nigbt at the Y.M.C.A.
ing.
yor H. Wit Newkirk will be,
;rincipal speaher, and Horatio
tt wi-l be the toa Lmaster. Sev-
Ann Arbor business nien will
addresses at the banquet, fol-
rig which an exhibition of
ining will be given.
ovisiohs for the dinner are do-
d by local und national mer-
ts and iambers of the Wo-
s autxilia y will do all the work.
ipts from the. dinner will be
to enable boys to attend Camp
ett who otherwise would not be
to because of financial cohdi-
i.Reservation,) for the din r
:h is open to -;he public should
honed in to the Y.M.C.A. desk
re 9 o'clock Friday morning.
CYPEWRITER

Aeca'use the equipment is com-
para tively simple its possibilities
for use as a link in land and wire-
less telephone systems seems obvi-
0US.
Not Affected by Climate.
The ray-called the "micro-ray"
is not affected by climatic condi-
tions, such as fog and rain. Be-
cause it travels only in a straight
line and does not "wander" secret
commnication between warship,
various battle units, such as air-
planes, is felt assurecd.
Furthe r, it is"xpected to be u"se-
ful ins 1landing ai.rplan~es insfog or
darknc s and i. locaig fog-bound
sea vessels .
In the fi ld of television the com-
pany expects the micro-ray to per-
mit development not possible in the
lon'ger wave lengths.
Since the major problem in radio
today is overcrowding of the ether,
this growing congestion gave im-
^tus to the research and explora-
tion of the short wave ranges, engi-
neers explained.
1MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY - A
skunk has become the mascot of
the university. By way of initiation
the animal submitted to a minor
operation.

Give

i
+/+n

First

Him

Starring
Picture

A Big
Hand

privileged child.

I

m

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11.30 to 1,30
SALMON CROQUETIS
VFAL LOAF
CREA D POTATOES
PEAS AND CARROTS
RICE PUDDING
COFFEE OR MILK

30c
5:30 to 7:30
SOUP
ASPARAGUS OMELETTE
BAKED STUFFED WHITE FISH
ROAST BEEF, HORSERADISH
SAUCE
STUFFED PORK CHOPS
SAUERKRAUT WITH ROAST
PORK
MASHED OR FRENCH FRIED
POTATOES
PEAS, SAUERKRAUT OR
LETTUCE SALAD
35c
PARTY FAVORS {

THE WILL) "JUJL"
Drums of "Juju" wvitchcraft seit
tribe in Blood-luist frenzy, The
escape. Boat almost upset when
woiundedl allig ator attacks it.
CRUELEST WOMAN IN
AFRICA
Baautiful white girl raised by can-
nibals. She rules black tribe with
bestial cruelty. Arrival of white
men. The escape with White God-
dess!

j nT

t

a

I

h-

THE BIG GUN OF
WAR COMEDIESI
-WA aN E fQ0R OS 6re3I

I

FRATERNITY JEWEERY

ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL r. BAY
JEWELBR AND OPTOMETRICST
Nickel Arcade
- - .1 . .w.. l _ ~« . w.w, -..w . a ~ . .. w.;A.: ...

Bombshells of laugh-
ter! Explosions of joy!
A sweeping barrage of
howls and screams !
with
Harry Langdon
and
BEN LYON

He's here now
in his first great
starring entertain-
ment!
And what a pic-
ture! A thrilling
sea drama made
with the co-opera-
tion of the U. S.
Navy. You must
see-

Hobart
Bosworth
Ernest
Torrence

A
HARRY POLLARD
production
witbr
'Dorothy
Jordan
Cliff
Edwards

JUNGLE WAR
Never before seen on any screen!
The battle of the lions! Man
against beast. The Ilungina lion
speared with pointed stick runs
amuck!

nakes of machines.
equipment and per-
n e I are considered
g the best in the State. The result
'enty years' careful building.
0. D. MORRILL

I

.

[

South State St. Phone 6615

to
Ass

FOR TONIGHT

WHTE MAN'S LOVE

11

11.

PATHE
REVIEW

{II!

x

immErXTRA ADDEDW---
COMEDY RIOT
HARRY GRIBBON
"EX-SWEETIES"

EA
NE3

'.I

abr aurn

I

R ;
'r a0. .da.'+ m ,. .'..dam YEFws
'r

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