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May 19, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-19

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'THE MICHICAN DAILY

{)I([ RUTH NICHOLS WILL ATTEMPT SOLO
17LIILLHOP ACROSS ATLANTIC OCEAN SOON
IC 4HnIT(~k
TD091

AT GENEVA TODAYjjV

FACULTY MEN SEE YALE ABOLITION
OF LATIN REQUIREMENT AS LOGICAL

i

litary Ships to
8 o'Clock
e Hop.
APS OCCUR
on Expected to
Foulis Asks

IFEELD, Dayton, 0., May 18-]
he army's flying forces today
winning their fight against
ght of time and the laws of
tages.
one. day remains before the
Iitary phaes of the United
army air corps are to trek,
ies c'oss-country to Chicago
ow their wingmarship, but
ly. two days of practice at,
ion flying they were ready
ke a creditable showing.
despite the fact that such
gaherin gs of airmen usually
e accilnts. ev<.ry plane was
ed to mnake the trip. Only
ninor mishaps were chalked
nidy, causing the ships to be
0e4 for repairs.
task of assembling hundreds
ps from every section of the
y and teaching them the in-
es of battle and parade for-
as neared completion without
e fatality to mar the maneu-
Motors Prepared.
ety first," the principal .of
aen. Benjam-in D. Foulis, as-
chief of the air corps, was
>st in the minds of his men
as they tuned and inspected
planes for another practice
such as thrilled Ohio and
a residents Sunday. Mechan-
rked into the night to have
notor ready. This afternoon
as given over to maintenance
The Ohicago take-off is set

Financiers Unite on Anniversary
of International Bank to
Discuss Its Work.
M'GARRAH HAS REPORT
Duties of Organization Increase
as Handling of Reparations
Falls in Importance.
BASEL, May 18. - (A, - Some of
the world's most noted flnanciers
were gathered here today for the
first annu1a. general meeting of the
Bank of International Settlements,
inaugurated May 20, 1930, under
the terms of the Young Plan.
They included the governors of
the central banks of most of the
former belligerent states, all of
whom hold stock in the institution.
The American president, Gates W.
McGarrah, had ready his first year's
report for the meeting.
The Bank of the International
Settlements was conceived as a
reparations conduit, a means of
transferring some of the most irri-
tating European post-war problems
from political to commercial obli-
gations.

Give Approval of Action, Saying
I Was Delayed; Vision New
Vitality as Result.
In response to the editorial,
"Dead Languages Die," in The I
Daily Saturday, three professors of
the Greek and Latin departments
yesterday voiced their approval of.
the exclusion of the subjects as re-
quirements at Yale.
Prof. John G. Winter, head of
the Latin department, said that the
action was noteworthy, chiefly be-
cause it has been so long delayed.
"Few colleges now make these
studies compulsory for a degree.
Michigan dropped the Greek re-j
quirement nearly half a century
ago and Latin about 1900. This has
not led to the extinction of Latin-
rather to a new vitality. Students
who take our courses, now do so,'
because they are interested in
them, and no member of the de-
partment would wish a return to
I the old requirements. Latin will
continue to hold a place in the
high schools and universities for a
number of reasons: many people
still believe it is not only an excel-
lent disciplinary subject, proved by
centuries of experience, but also an
essential background to the study
of Romance languages, ancient his-
tory, medicine, dentistry, and law.
It embodies a great literature; it
still remains the official.language
of the Catholic church, and inter-
est in it will continue so long as
many of our own ideas and insti-
tutions remain objects of serious
study. We at Michigan do not be-
lieve that it needs a "protective
tariff" in the educational scheme
[ HK F

of things, but we do maintain that,
both in the higli schools and col-
leges, an opportunity for studying
it should be given to any student
who wishes to do so."
Prof. Warren E. Biake, of the
Greek department, held the view
that, because of the countless ben-

m

efit~s occured from their study most
persons should take the subjects.
"The dropping of Latin and
Greek as entrance requirements for
any university is a loss to the stu-
dents, not to the classics. Yale's
decision won't affect thousands-of -
years old Latin and Greek ...They
had no trouble surviving another
such decline, called the 'Dark
Ages.'"
"This is only the natural thing.
We are in an industrial age. The1
greatest loss that these 'non-clas-
sicists' are suffering is that which
comes from cutting loose from
fundamentals. They would try to
drive the machine, without know-
ing its workings. Colleges are more'
and more becoming trade school's.
Specialists they turn out-special-
ists who will make money. If you
ask them what their object is m
ammassing wealth, they will 'tell
you, to be able to buy the pleasures
of life. But, poor people, they have
never learned what the pleasures
are. People become narrow to earn
money to become broadened; aren't
there a couple of unnecessary steps
in there?
"It is true the classics are no
longer the sources for our science.
But philosophy-do you know that
even in this age, there is not a
man living who is neither an Aris-
totlean or a Platoist?
"Have the classics outlived their
usefulness? Perhaps, but still the'
University of Michigan English de-
partment wants its graduate stu-
dents to study Latin and Greek-,
and Dean Bates advice to his po-
tential lawyers is to know Latin."
Prof. Arthur Dunham, of the
Latin department, does not think.
that the study of Latin and Greek
ought to be obligatory.
"No stereotyped mold should be
made for humanity.sThe privilege
of literary pursuit should' be ex-
tended only to him who wants it.
The literary art imbedded in Latin
and Greek bears the same relation
to thinking as music to sound, as
sculpture to form. Latin inevitab-
ly aids in the artistic expression of
one's thoughts.

Fighting Strength of Ship Twice
Its Size Has Been Built
Into Deutschland.'
KIEL, May ) scenes
of past imperial days wifl be r-
called Tuesday when the German
navy's youngest and strongest post-
war cruiser "A" will be launched.
The octogenarian soldier-president,
awil Von Hindenburg, will be spon-
sor of :he cruiser and' smash the
traditional bottle' of champagne.
The entire German navy is as-
sembled in Kiel harbor especially
for this occasion. An elaborate pro-
gram has been worked out, crowned
by the attendance of President Von
Hidenburg. At the moment the
"grand old man" arrives at Kidl
main station the whole fleet will
fire a salute of 21 guns, while at the
same time the presidential colors
will be hoisted on the cruiser
Koenigsberg.
Will Re Flagship.
The cruiser will be chriatened
"Deutschland" and is to serve as
flagship, replacing the old "Schles-
wigholstein." It is a rule in the
German navy that the name of a
new ship shall not be revealed until
the launching, but this time the
news leaked out in advance.
Owing to the restrictions of the
Treaty of Versailles, the German
engineers had to construct into tho
vessel of 10,000 tons a fighting
strength of 20,000 tons. A further
novelty is the newly devised defen-
sive arrangement against mines
which, of course, is kept secret, en-
abling the wareiaft to pass any
mine barrier without the slightest
risk.
No Rivets Used.
The body of the vessel consists of
welded steelplates; absence of rivets
saves deadweight for the benefit of
a heavier armament. For the first
t'imn* in the historv J f w rxraf t

GERIMAN PRESI9DENv1T
TO CHRISTENNE
'POC'KET' WABt IP
Hindenburg Sponsors Cruiser
Constructed Under 'Terms .f
Treaty of Versailles.
WILL USE CHAMPAGNE

Activities Increase.
In the popular mind the bank's
activity concerns only the German I
debt payments. This was a prime
reason for its creation but within
one year's time this duty has be-
come the smaller side of its work.
The administration of monthly
payments made by Germany is a
routine operation which could be
handled by any trust company.
Consequently officials place their

Associated, Press Photo
Ruth Nichols of Rye, N. Y., hopes to be the first woman to complete
the hazardous Atlantic solo flight. Her proposed route and her plane,
are shown above.
Todays RadPrograms
(Eastern 'Standard Time)

eld up the maneu-
n early morning
llation of practice,
red by noon and
ew which 2;00000

sky
ed -a

A notable gathering was arrang-
l for tonight. Two assistant sec-
taries for the air, F. Trubee Davi-
rn of 'the war department and
avid S. Ingalls of the navy, are to
present, along with Senator
,meon D. Fess of Ohio, Republican
ational chairman; Maj. Gen.
,mes E. Fechet, chief of the air
rps; Federal Judge Benson W.
ough, who also is commander of
L Ohio National Guard, and Con-
essman Frank W. James of Mich-
an, chairman of the military af-
irs committee of the house.
Three Pilots f11.
An enemy attack-mumps-play-
ihavoc with the 94th squadron of
e F4rst Pursuit group, and as a
sult three pilots were in the Self-
dge Field, Mich., base hospital, to-
ty.
Lieut. Harry A. Johnson, com-
ander of the 94th, and two of his
ght leaders-Lieuts. N. B. Harbold
d Carl Feldman -were taken
wk to their home station Sunday
hen the commanding general de-
ded they would be better off at
'me inasmuch as they would be
able to accompany their units
. the remainder of the maneuvers
progress here.
,nquet Will Honor
Pharmacy Students
A banquet for the honor students
the pharmacy school is to be
Id at 6:30 o'clock tomorrow night
the Michigan League building.
Dr. W. B. Hinsdale is to be the
incipal speaker at the banquet at
rich three awards are to be given
otstanding pharmacy students.
an Edward H. Kraus, of the
Qege of Pharmacy, will present
eawards to the winners of the
hn and Fink award, the Rho Chi
) prize to a freshnan, and the
Larles R. Eckler prize.
rucannon to Discuss
Paover Administration
Dr. Paul M. Cuncannon, of the
litical science department, will
k at 4:15 o'clock Thursday, May
in room D, Alumni hall, on
erbert Hoover and His Adminis-
Ition.L"
He will discuss the possibility of.
rbert Hoover's receiving the Re-
blican nomination for President

Homelike songs will be sung by
Frank Crumit and Julia Sanderson
,in the Blackstone Plantation pro-
gram coming over Stations WWJ,
WTAM, WGY tonight at 7 o'clock.
The songs are "Molly and I and the
Baby," "Goodbye Rose," and "Mrs.
Murphy's Chowder." Other songs
are "When You're Smiling," "Some
Other Bird Whistled a Tune,"
"Foolish Facts," "In the Land of
Harmony," and "The One I Love.
Can't Be oBthered." The orchestra
under the direction of Jack Shil-
kret will feature "Rio Negro."
CONFERENCE TI TI[
WON BY DEBATERS

Michigan Speakers Take
Out of Six Contests,
to Win Laurels.

Four

Joining together to give radio lis-
teners a treat tonight at 9:30 o'clock
over the Columbia chain, Morton
Downey, JesseCrawford, and Dom-
enic Savinao and his orchestra will
offer a program of popular tunes.
Morttn Downey will sing two num-
bers into the microphone, "I Sur-
r'ender Dear" and "When the Shep-
herd Leaves His Sheep Back Home."
"Jazz Patrol," "Skippy," "Whistiing
in the Dark," and "Sweetheart of
Sigma Chi" will be played by the
orchestra.
3:40-Baseball scares-WJR
4:00--Pacific Vagabonds-WENR, WREN
4:30-1ERT LOWN and his orchestra-WXYZ,
WFBL, WLBW
5:00-Mary Phillips, Don Voorhees-WEAF,
WGY, WTIC
HARRY TUCKER and his Barclay or-
chestra-WXYZ, WLBW, WABC
5:15-Peter Van Steeden and his orchestra-
WENR, WGAR. WJZ
5:30-Savannah Liners orchestra-WJZ
5:45--Ben Bernie and his orchestra-WXYZ
6:35-Final baseball scares-WJR
6:45-Ramblers, Rondoliers quartet-WENR,
WREN, WJZ.
7:00-PAUL WHITEMAN and his orchestra,
-WJR, WLW, kDKAI
Julia Sanderson and Frank Crumit-
WWJ, WTAM, WGY
7:30-COON SANDERS dance orchestra-
s WWJ, WGY, WGN
7:45-Round TownersGwith Irene Beasley -
WFB.L, WLBW, WABC
8:30-happy Wonder Bakers-WWJ. WTAM
PHILCO SYM'PHO7NY concert-WXYZ,
WLBW, WEAN
9:00-B. A. ROLFE and his orchestra-WWJ,
WTAM, WKY
9:15-Richie Craig, jr.-WXYZ, WEAN
9:30-PARAMOUNT Publix program, Morton
Downey-WXYZ, WBBM, WABC
9:45-Boswell Sisters-WREN. WGAR, KDKA
10:00-FLETCHER HENDERSON and his or-
chestra-WXYZ, WLBW, WABC
Slumber Music, Ludwig Laurier-WJZ,'
WBAL, WRC
10:30-Dream Pictures," Archer Gibson -
WGAR, WJZ
CabFCalloway, and his orchestra-
WEAF, WRC
Romanelli and his King Edward orches-
tra--WXYZ, WLBW, WFBL
11:00-PAUL WHITEMAN and his orchestra-
WGAR, WREN, WENR
Jack Albin and his orchestra-WTAM,
WGY, WENR
OZZIE NELSON and his Pelham Heath
orchestra-WXYZ, WEAN, WFBM
11:25-Red Apple Club-WJR
11:30-Verne Buck and his orchestra-VIGAR,
WREN, WGN
12:00-Nighthawk Fro4ic-WDAF
Dance music-KTSA
1:00-Midn'g;A Merry-mkers-CWK
Dance music-KWFB

energy in other financial fields.
Reparations funds represent less
than 20 per cent of total assets,
which amount to $372,000,000.
Because of the increasing number
of Central banks which are deposit-
ing their foreign currency reserves
with the "Bis," the banking depart-
ment has taken on. rapid growth.
In March deposits amounted to 1,-
000,800,000 Swiss francs. Creditors
use the "Bis" as they would any
other bank as a depository for the
funds which may be employed to
discharge debts.
Banks Hold 200,000 Shares.
The bank's authorized capital is
500,000,000 Swiss francs, divided into
200,000 shares, subscribed by the
Central banks of Belgium, England,
France, Germany and Italy, the
Industrial Bank of Japan, the J. P.
Morgan & Co., of New York, the
First National Bank of New York
and the First National Bank of
Chicago.
This world institution, housed in
an old Victorian hotel, acts as trus-
tee for government loans. It has
actually three such: the Dawes and
Young loans and an Austrian loan.
Bank governors of various coun-
tries have discovered that one of
the greatest uses of the bank is as
a place of rendezvous for them.
This has become a utility for dis-
cussion of financial problems and
movements of currency.

3
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Employment Insurance Is Topic
for Contests Next Year
in High Schools.
Unemployment Insurance will be
the topic debated upon by the
Michigan High School Debating
league in the season 1931-32, ac-
cording to James H. McBurney of
the speech department, newly ap-
pointed manager of the league.
Definite wort1ing of the subject
has not yet been decided, said Mr.
McBurney. The Detroit Free Press,
which has sponsored the contests
for a number of past seasons, will
again take charge. The champion-
ship debate will be held in Ann Ar-
bor on April 29, 1932, in conjunc-
tion with the Michigan Schoolmas-
ters Club.
This year's contest, won by De-
troit St. Anthony high school, was
attended by an audience of 5,000,1
the largest ever to hear a cham-
pionship debate of the league, ac-
cording to a bulletin released by
Prof. G. E. Densmore of the speech
department, former league mana-
ger. Definite statement of next
year's question, together with the
league literature, will be sent to
every high school in the state on
September 1, says the bulletin.

building a considerable quantity of
Alpha Nu to Discuss light metal has been used for the
inner constructions.
e iIThe Diesel machinery plant which
is the biggest ever installed in a
Alpha Nu chapter of Kappa Phi vessel means a revolution in ship-
Sigma, national literary and de- ping. It develops 50,000 horsepower
bating society, will hold its final and its total weight amounts to
meeting of the year at 7:3a o'clock 171/2 pounds per horsepower com-
tonight in the Alpha Nu room, An- pared to 110 pounds for Diesel mot-
gell hall. In this closed meeting ors up to 1918.
important business will be discus- This plant gives the vessel a speed
sed and officers for the following of 26 knots and a cruising radius
year will be elected, it was an- of 10,000 miles. The christening
nounced. ceremonies will be concluded by
At the meeting, manuscripts sub- navy maneuvers and a review of
mitted for the Sibyl, the annually the whole fleet off Kiel bight by
prepared year book of the chap- President Von Hindenburg aboard
ter, edited this semester by Charles the Koenigsberg.
Ranck, '31, will be returned.. Copies
of the Sibyl will be available for
those who have not had the oppor- e
tunity fo read it. f m

ia

------------

Michigan outranked all other in-
stitutions in the Western Confer-
ence Debating League, having won
four of six debates, it was learned
yesterday.
Wisconsin finished last in the
Conference, having lost four of the
six contests. Each of the other eight
schools was even in its schedule,
winning three and losing three.
Following are tabulated results:
Men: Michigan affirmative won'
from Qhio at Ann Arbor; Michigan
negative lost to Indiana at Bloom-
ington; subject: "Unemployment
Insurance." Michigan negative won
from Northwestern at Evanston;
Michigan affirmative won from
Wisconsin at Ann Arbor; subject:
"Abolition of Distinction between
Amateurism and Professionalism in
College Athletics."
Women: Michigan negative won
from Ohio at Columbus; Michigan
affirmative lost to Indiana at Ann
Arbor; subject: "Compulsory Auto-
mobile Liability Insurance."

Freshman Rendezvous
Club to Meet Tonight
Members of the FreshmanRen-
dezvous club, composed of fresh-
man men who attended the Fresh-
man Rendezvous camp, held by the
Student Christian association in
September, will meet at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in Lane hall.
At the meeting, final plans will
be made for a canoe trip to be held
on Saturday, May 23.

NOW
SHOWING

w erth

1:30-3:00
7:00-8:45

LAST TIMES TODAY
MARY ASTOR
"Behind Office Doors"
WEDNESDAY

GEORGE
SIDNEY

CHARLIE
MURPHY

IN

Tam I

MALE HELP WANTED
AGENTS, automobile gas saver, carry vest
pocket, sells $1.50, profit 100%, extra
'50% for installing. Write 'at once for ter-
ritory.
E. T. BARRON & CO.
19 East Lake St. Minneapolis, Minn.

"COHENS & KELLYS i Africa"
You laughed at them in Atlantic City, in New York, and in Scot-
land, but in Africa they surpass everything. You will howl at their antics
in the jungle, at their love making in -a harem and at them when they
talk elephants out of ivory.

NI

-
,Ie loved to fight--
and fought to love.
WARNER BROS.
Present

s!

- -.

,I.

I

GRAVEL

I

s . rd

FAY WRAC"
VKTOR VARCONI,
CHARLIS JIJOELS
"
NATAIE.
MOORHEAD

KILLINS GRAVEL
COMPANY
Telephone 7112

.

I

i-

.....

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
MACARONI AND CHEESE
MEAT LOAF
SHREDDED LETTUCE
PRUNE WHIP
COFFEE, MILK

I

I

WATLING
L ERCHEN &
HAYES
Members
New York Stock Exchange
Detroit Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
'Dealers in
Inves tment
Securities

Vie gthe.
loverCrae

ate Wii las 19 11h

30c
5:30 to 7e:30
SWISS STEAK
V rTXrnA A T% fA flflNT

ADDED
Glenn Tryon Comedy.

I I1

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