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May 13, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

31 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

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NANA G[

saders for Major
Sports Selected

I ~Foreign Languages
J LUCultural Necessity,
DS Believes Pargrment
"It is hard to imagine a cultured
person who doesn't know at least
one foreign language well," stated
and Prof. Pargment, head of the French
department here, in ai? interview
yesterday.
"Any cultured and educated per-
NT son should instinctively know the
cultural, international and social
Will I value of the study of languages,"
1 he continued. Professor Alexander
Zivet, formerly head of the langu-
age and mathematics department
rteen in the Engineering School, often
ninor declared that a person who knows'

[DET

f Officers
e at Next

appointment of thi
f major and m
executive board of
thletic Association
'ear was completed
other seven men
rd were elected

the
ifor
lyes-
nbers'
last'

omani, '33, will replace
Vhitney, '31, as hockey
ink Audrey Callander,
I the position of basket-
er which has been oc-
Elizabeth Loudon, '32,

>eedball will be under the man-
nent of Elizabeth Gardiner, '32,
is replacing Jean Bentley, '33,
Lydia Seymour,. '34, will hold
position of archery manager
ch was held by Miriam Carey,
this year.
fowling Manager Appointed.
an Perrin, '33, who was bowl-
manager this year, will be in
rge of golf, and Gladys Schro-
'33, has been appointed the
bowling chairman. Leonore
o, '33, will replace Marion Heald,
as chairman of dancing, and
aine Larson, '32, will replace
a Parks, '33, as rifle manager.
idora Gosling, '33, has been ap-
ited outdoor manager, and rid-
swimming, and tennis will be
iaged by Elizabeth Cooper, '34,
ine Fries, '34, and Jean Porter,
respectively.
he offices of chairman of the
nbership committee and A.C.A.
" representative have been com-
d this year, and Susan Man-
ster, '32, has been appointed to
position.
To Be Installed May 21.
hese officers will be installed at
next W.A.A.. board, meeting to
ield Thursday, May 21, at which
the officers elected last month
also be installed. Those elected
ill positions on the board are
)thy Elsworth, '32, president
a Bentley, '33, vice president,
.joiy Hunt, '32, secretary, Agnes
aam, '32, treasurer, Clara Grace
k, '33, point recorder, Annette
imngs, '33; publicity manager,
Helen Townsend, '32Ed., intra-
,al manager.
he executive board of W.-A. A.
s in co-operation with, the
sical education department for
fen in managing all interclass
intramural sports.

cnly one language sees the world
with but one eye."
"The practical value of the study
of French for women is limited to
teaching,hresearch work, and study.
Of course, it is of inestimable value
in travel," he said.
"To acquire a good knowledge of
French, it is necessary to have at
least six, or seven years study," he
continued. "The entire world, the
United States excepted, requires a
I minimum training of six, or seven
years, and at least ten years for
the teacher."
"However, it is rather remarkable
how much progress American stu-
dents are making with the study of
French and foreign languages."
"They are able to achieve probably
as much in four years as most
French students do in six years.
This is due to the fact that the
American student is older, and has
harder work to cover in a shorter,
period of time. The French stu-
dent is much younger when he be-
gins the study of the language.be-I
In conclusion, Mr. Pargment
stated, "it is my personal opinion,
as a result of experience, that wo-
men are just as good teachers as
men.

PAGEANT DRESSES
GIENOUT TODAY
Costumes Cut Out by Committee
and Sewed by Women Who
Are in Dances.
"We expect to finish giving out
the Pageant costumes today or to-
morrow," said A d a Blackman,
chairman of the costume commit-
tee. "Using the corrective room in
Barbour gymnasium for our head-
quarters, we have ordered mater-
ial and cut out patterns for 150
I costumes required for the pageant}
in three weeks."
"We are giving the sewing direc-
tions to each group," she continu-
ed, "but with the exception ofI
those in thetBallet andeGavotte,
every woman must sew her own
costume. The Ballet costumes are
being borrowed from this year's
Junior Girls' Play, and some of the
Gavotte costumes from last year's
Junior Girls' Play."
Miss White Plans Costumes.
Miss Blackman modestly declin-
ed to take any credit for the de-
signing of the costumes. "Miss
White really planned all the cos-
tumes," she said. "We only follow-
ed her suggestions." "Some of the
women think they are too realis-
tic," she laughed. "Those in the
primitive group, for instance, are
not at all pleased about wearing
the dull brown that we thought
represented pre-historic wearing
apparel."
"The costumes I think most ef-
fective," she said in conclusion,"
are the flowing blue robes trimmed
in gold that are to be used for the
Early Renaissance dance, and the
stiff, shiny, red ones that are worn
by the modernistic group."

MEMORIAL 1EXHIBIT
HELD THISMO T
Lizzie P. Bliss to Be Honored
at Chicago Museum of
Modern Art.
In memory of Lizzie P. Bliss,
sponsor of art who recently died in
Chicago, the Museum of Modern
Art of that city is opening an ex-
hibition during the latter part of
May which will run throughout the
summer months, in whichhthey will
present to the public the private
collection of Miss Bliss which she
bequeathed to the museum, as well
as several valuable pieces whichshe
left to other organizations of art.
Comments concerning the death
of Miss Bliss have emphasized the
se: ious loss which the art circles
have experienced in losing her in-
fluence and sponsorship in art. Her
work in establishing a permanent
museum of modern art has been of
unique significance.
The collection which she has ac-
cumulated includes no less impor-
tant names than those of Toulouse
Lautrec, Cezanne, Van Gogh, and
Gauguin. She has also done con-
siderable work towards collecting
important pieces of the American
artist, Arthur B. Davies.
MINNESOTA-The senior women
at Carleton exceed the men in
scholastic averages. They lead the
class with 1.75 average. It was also
shown that students increased
slightly in their grades the longer
they remain in school.

J. G. P. AUTHORS TO MEET
TOMORROW AFTERNOON
The meeting of sophomore wo-
men, which was announced in
yesterday's Daily as taking place
Tuesday, will be held, instead, at
4 o'clock tomorrow in the Wo-
men's L ea gu e building. The
meeting is for the purpose of
gathering together all sopho-
more women who are interested
in submitting manuscripts for
next year's Junior Girls' Play.
Prof. Howard Mumford Jones
will speak at the meeting, giv-
ing pointers on the way in which
the books should be written.
There are no particular require-
ments for those women who are
interested in writing plays. It is
suggested, however, that no -two
or more women plan to collabor-
ate on a book.I

the best scores in the tournament.

SORORITIES GIVE
FOR SENIOR

SPECIAL PARTIES
WOMEN THIS WEEK

Guest Dinners, Midnight Spread,
and Rushing Contribute
to Activities.
Senior dinners, rushing parties,
and midnight spreads, make up the
leading social events of the sorori-
ties for this week.
The junior members of Kappa
Kappa Gamma, gave a formal din-
ner for the seniors of their chap-
ter last night. Corsages and pres-
ents were presented by the fresh-
men and sophomores. Tonight, the
Beta Delta board will be honored
at the chapter by an informal din-

ner. Spring flowers and yellow tap-
ers will form the decoration scheme.
On Saturday the entire chapter is
to drive out to Hillsdale for their
bi-annual state convention.
Last night the members of Chi
Omega gave a spread for their Sen-
iors after closing hours. Each sen-
ior was presented with a corsage.
Pi Beta Phi is having a guest din-
ner tonight for the fijends of the

TENNIS PLAYERS
GIVEN EXTENSION
Third Rounds Must Be Played by
Friday Afternoon.
Time in which third rounds of
the tennis tournament may be
played off has been extended to
Friday afternoon, May 15, it was
announced yesterday. Due to the
weather conditions, only a few of
the contestants were able to play
off their games before today y
Entrants in the tournament are
asked to play the elimination games
as soon as possible so that the fin-
al matches can be held, Virginia
Watson, '32, W.A.A. tennis manager,
announced. Plans are being made
to selectan honorarybMichigan
team from the players who make
the best scores in the. tournament.

ATHENA ANNOUNI
TEAM FOR DEBI
Question of Sharing E
Expenses Will Be Subje
for Debate.
Athena, women's literary ar
bating society, has announc
team for the debate with Ad
men's forensic organization,
will take place next Tuesday
in the Adelphi room of Angel
Those chosen for the tear
Marie Wellstead, '32, Florencc
cock, '32, and Nelda Schere
Dorothy Bloomgarden has c
of arranging the contest
Adelphi and is coaching the A
team.
The subject which was cho
the two societies for the de:
Resolved: that the expenm
dates should be shared equa
men and women. The debat
non-decision contest as its
purpose is for entertainmen
Last night two women wer
tated at a formal ceremony h
the League building. They
Isabel Bonicave, '34, and Dc
Ann Williams, '34. Refresh
were served and music was p

chapter.V

ed for danlcing.

lr. .

The

11.

N.odiste Shoppe

SUMMER FASHIONS
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
REMODELING-HEMSTITCHING

Michigan League
WILL SERVE
Seveny-Five Cent Luncheon

WANT ADS PAY

III

Dial 2-1129

620 East Liberty

-"

everything
that's new,

AND

MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONE CO.

Dollar Dinners

IN THE
BAL ROOM
DURING THE MAY FESTIVAL
2325

Newest styles and the newest
materials . . . that's why the
fashionables come to Jacob-
sons for their shoes.

SUVA MESH
LINENS
WHITE KID
BLONDE
PATENT.
- - . and new values at

Telephone Home

I1

Long Distance Rates
are Surprisingly
Low

'Delightfully Femini
niFormal and Semi Form

,$500
15 to $8

May
Festival

The representative rates listed below are for day
Station-to-Station calls and are effective between 4:30
a. m. and 7:00 p. m.
A Station-to-Station call is one trade to a telephone
number rather than to a particular person.

Frocks in

NO CHARGE
FOR
TINTING

You may reverse the
phone if you wish.

charges to your home tele-

Hill Auditorium, May 13, 14, 15,
16.
Tickets (6 concert) $6.00, $7.01,
$8.00.
FIRST CONCERT, Lily Pons, So-
prano; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Wednesday Evening,
SECOND CONCERT, "at. Francis
of Assissi" by Pierne. Hilda Burke,
Soprano;Eleanor Reynolds, Contral-
to; Frederick Jagel, Tenor; Nel-
son Eddy, Baritone; Fred Patton,
Bass; The Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra; The University Choral
Union, Earl V. Moore, Conductor,
Thursday Evening.
THIRD CONCERT, "Old Johnny
Appleseed" by Gaut. Hilda Burke,
Soprano; Eleanor Reynolds, Con-
tralto; Palmer Christian, Organ-
ist, Orchestral accompaniment;
Children' Festival Chorus; Eric
Delamarter and Juva Higbee,
Conductors, Friday afternoon.
FOURTH CONCERT, Ignace
Jan Padercwski, Pianist; Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, Frederick
Stock, Conductor, FridayEvening.,
FIFTH CONCERT, Ruth Breton,
Violinist; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Saturday afternoon.

Jaobson S

Rates from Ann Arbor to:

Day
Station-to-Station
Rates

ALPENA....... .

$1.15

''. ;
b
,'
,; ,
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,
,+,t
r '
x;
7
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T
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;,
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a
Yy i
a
n c
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ALM A ................................
BATTLE CREEK......................

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OIl

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Tillinery bpecial
TODAY ONLY

CALUMET .........
COLDWATER ......
CINCINNATI, O.
CLEVELAND, O.
GRAND HAVEN

.2.10

.60

1.10

.70

Straw Sports Hats
For today only we are offering
you this exceptional opportunity to
secure a smart sports hat at a great
saving. New and flattering styles
and materials assure you of finding.
the hat you've been looking for.
All head sizes are represented in
this selection selling at only ... .

.. .90

HASTINGS ................

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HILLSDALE.........................

.45

Pastels and printed chiffons, and muslin de-soi
We have been told repeatedly by our customers that
our styles and colors are exceptionally attractive this
season. Let us show you our assortment of formal

IRON MOUNTAIN
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in delightfully'

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$200

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ST. CLAIR.. ..

$1975- 2975 -$3975

ALL SALES FINAL

Your calls will be speeded if you give the
operator the number of the distant telephone.
If You dn not know the unmbe

.ems

11

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