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May 13, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-13

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WtHE MICHICAN DAILY

. ar a s a vs s y ... a .. .+a,
e

ADS CANDIDA TES
R BASEBALL JOB

SCUEILTTER
RIVE BYHOB

STUDENT

UI

HEALTH

VI

West

JUNE 6

ular Class Work to ContinueI
hrough, June s; Schedule .
to End June 16.
amination schedules for the
id semester will be distributed
he Colleges of Engineering and
itecture this week in the office
e secretary, in the West Engi-j
ng building, it was announced Associated Press Photol
rday by Prof. Clyde E. Love, William Harridge,
tor of examinations. Former railway executive, and at
gular class work will continue present secretary of the American
Friday night, June 5, and ex- I League, who is one of the leading
ations will begin the following candidates for the position of pres-
.ing, continuing until Tuesday, dnta yof the league, which involves
16. ' '
lowing is the examination
lule for the Colleges of Engi-
ng anct Architecture: FORESTERS FIELD
day at 8, Wednesday, June 10,,
ing; Monday at 9, Friday, June'
orning; Monday at 10, Mon-,
June 8, morning; Monday at
itu 1a , June 6, morning; Mn- Ross Stevens Annuonces Games
Monday at 2, Tuesday, . June to Be Held Saturday at
orning; Monday at 3, Tuesday, Forestry Farm.
16, afternoon.
sday at 8, Saturday, June 13, The annual Foresters' Field Day
ing; Tuesday at. 9, Monday, will be held at the Forestry Farm
15, afternoon; Tuesday at 10; on West Liberty road Saturday,
lay, June 9, morning; Tuesday May 16; according to an announce-
Tuesday, June 9, afternoon; ment made last evening by Ross
lay at .1, Thursday, June 11, 0. Stevens, Grad, F & C, president
ioon; Tuesday at 2, Friday, of the Forestry club.
12, afternoon; Tuesday at 3, A schedule of events has been
.day, June 13,.afternoon. planned beginning at 9 o'clock in
M4. 1, 2, C, E. 2, Drawing 2, the morning and lasting until 4
ay, June 8, afternoon; Survey- o'clock in the afternoon. They will
4. Wednesday, June 10, after- include pistol shooting, both long
M. E. 3; Draw. 1, Saturday, and short range, . rifle shooting,
6, afternoon; Shop 2, 3, 4, sawing, chopping, traverse running,
day, June 11, morning; E. E. an obstacle race around the lake,
aturday, June 13, afternoon, horse-shoe pitching, canoe racing
periods may be used as ir- j and tilting, a baseballgame and a
r periods provided there is no tug of War.
ct with the other schedule. Three places will be awarded in
mination hours in the morn- each event. A double bitted camp
te from 8 to 12 o'clock and in axe will be awarded to the high
ternoon from 2 until 6 o'clock. point man in each of the Fresh-
ng and laboratory work may man-Sophomore, J u n i o r-Senior-
itinued through the examina- Graduate, and Faculty groups.
eriod in amount equal to that The committee in charge consists
ally devoted to such work dur- of Ross 0. Stevens, Grad, F & C,
te week. Max Melick, '31 F & C, John Wren-
single course is permitted ham, '31 F & C, Gordan Raynor,
than four hours of examina- '32 F & C, John Billingsley, '32;
So date of examination may F& C, Clifford Anderson, '31 F &+
nged without the consent of C, Ralph Smoot and William Ja-
lassification committee. All cobs, Grad, F & C.

Michigan Scientist Sends Word
That CAll Is Well' at
Greenland Post.-
Prof. William H. Hobbs, of the
geology department, received a let-
ter, dated April 10, yesterday from
Evans S. Schmeling who is in
charge of the south station, one of
the Michigan expedition stations,
located at Ivigtut, Greenland.
Schmeling said that all was well.
Due to frequent snow storms and
cloudy weather, however, they had
not been able to make any balloon
observations, as they had planned.
Schmeling will return to Ann Ar-
bor early in September.
Word was received from William
S. Carlson, '30, who is in charge of
another Michigan station about 1,-
000 miles north of Ivigtut, the first
week of April. Carlson is associated
with Max H. Demorest, '32.
The message had been sent 3001
miles by dog-sled and then relayed
by radio through Copenhagen. It
stated that members of the party
were well, and also that Carlson
was setting out on a sled trip
northward, leaving Demorest in
charge ofathe base, which has been
named Camp Irvin D. Scott. De-
morest will direct the balloon pro-
gram during Carlson's absence.
Professor Hobbs said that he ex-
pects letters from Carlson within
a week.t
JAPANESE MINERS
STRIKE AT TOKIO
200 Coal Workers Lock Selves
in Pit, Refuse to Work.

' .r
THE COMMON BOIL
By Maurice R. McGarvey, M. D.
For ages the boil has been a com-
mon affliction of the human race,
and University students do not
have any special immunity from
this condition. The boil is caused
by an acute infection of the skin
by a germ, known as the staphylo-
coccus, sometimes spoken of as a
pus-producing organism. The germ
itself is one of man's most common
and pernicious enemies, and is
found present on all human skin,
particularly the face and hands. It
gains entrance into the s k i n
through an abrasion or cut (which
may be very minute) or into one
of the hair follicles. Sometimes, en-
trance may be gained through irri-
tation of the skin by friction, for
example, the irritation produced
on the skin of the neck by a tight
collar.
A boil is characterized by a red,
hot, painful localized swelling of
the skin, which later "breaks down"
in its central portion, with a dis-
charge of pus. This drainage con-
tains numbers of the active living
germs which coming into contact
with surrounding normal skin may
cause other boils.
The localization of the boil is
brought about by the resistant fac-
tors present in the blood and tis-
sues of the victim of the boil. Oth-
erwise, this germ would travel re-
lentlessly into the tissues, and even
into the blood stream itself. As a
matter of fact, this extreme mis-
fortune sometimes happens.
In treating this condition, the
victim should place himself under
the care of his physician, whose
advice and treatment will be the
safe-guards against any unneces-
sary and serious complications.
"Home-made" methods of treat-
ment by the sufferer himself, or his
sympathetic friends are to be con-
demned. The danger lies in the
introduction of more germs into
the infected area, and the haphaz-
ard methods often help the germs
to progress farther into the skin
and other tissues.
Apart from the solitary boil, sev-
eral boils may break out in an area
of skin and as they progress, others
may begin to appear in a far re-
mote area. This should be an ex-
treme warning sign to the victim
that something has seriously "gone
wrong" with his general health, and
his resistance to disease producing
germs. He should immediately place
himself under the care of his ad-
visory physician.
Besides the necessary local treat-
ment to the boils, detailed physical
and laboratory examinations will
be made to determine the presence
of other disease in the patient, or

Oraforical Association
to Hold Finals Tonight
Finals of the extemporaneous
speaking contest of the Oratorical
association are scheduled for 2:30
o'clock today in the Adelphi room.
IThree awards of gold, silver, and
bronze medals will be made to the
winners in the contest, which will
be j dged by members of the speech
department faculty.
Those competing in today's con-
test are Gilbert E. Bursley, '34,
Isabel M. Bonicave, '34, E. Jerome
Pettit, Spec., Wilfred J. 'Smith, '34,
D. Robert Thomas, '32, and Donald
R. Tobey, '31.
Preliminaries and finals both con-
sist of five minutes prepared and
five minutes extemporaneous dis-
cussion of any phase of the ques-
tion, "Should University regulation
of student affairs extend beyond
the cla sroom?"}
What's
Going
Oan
THEATRES
Michigan - Norma Shearer and
Robert Montgomery in "Strangers
May Kiss."
Majestic-Alexander Gray, Louise
Fazenda, and Bert Roach in "Vien-
nese Nights."
Wuertb -George O'Brien in "Fair
Warning"'
Univer ity and American Chemi-
cal Society-"Recent Researches on
Methanol-Type Catalysts" by Prof.
Hugh S. Taylor, chairman of the
department of chemistry at Prince-1
ton university, at 4:15 o'clock, in
room 303, Chemistry building.
Actuarial Students - "Group An.
nuities" by G. Powell Hamilton, di-l
rector of group annuities, the
Equitable Life Assurance society of
the United States, at 1 o'clock in
room 3201, Angell hall.
poor functioning of his organs and
systems. Special inquiry must be
made in regard to the diet of the
sufferer, also rest, exercise, environ-
ment, mental and physical fatigue,
etc., and suitable adjustments made.
All treatment, then, including spe-
cial measures will be individual
and not general. Until all of this is
done, the boils may recur, and
abruptly terminate a scholastic ca-
reer for considerable length of
time.
Day sUntil1
Irc itects Ball

Student Parachute Jumper
Present Exhibition-.

17

tr
11.

toI

Planning to make his 298th para-
chute jump in three years next
Sunday afternoon at the annual
spring opening of the Ann Arbor
airport, Robert MacMillan, 33E, in-
tends to leap from a plane at a
height of 3,000 feet.
MacMillan began his career as
a parachute jumper when he was
in high school, Sunday's exhibition
being the fourth anniversary of his
first jump.
Intruder Is Held
Awakened_ by _a man with a plash

TO JUMP SUNDAY
FOR 298TH TIME

light, late Monday night, Mrs. Wil
liam C. Moules, 217 Kenwood, calle
the police, but the intruder had fle
when they arrived. Police later ar
rested Roy Strickland on the corne
of Jackson avenue and Gelndal
street. Strickland had a pair o
tennis shoes as well as a pair o
leather shoes and a flashlight i
the light truck which he was driv
ing.' He is being held for investiga
tion.
Crash Injures Woman
In a collision on the corner o
Gott and Pearl streets yesterday
Mrs. Jennie Scott suffered an in
jured leg. Albert O. Heinzmann, 92
Miner street, was the driver of th
other car. Both vehicles were dam
aged.

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEL

AERONAUTICS CONTEST DISCLOSES
PREVALENT STUDENT NEGLIGEN

Many Entries Barred by Judges
Because of Broken
Rules. -
W. E. Boeing's recent areonautics
scholarship contest, which entitled
the winners to substantial scholar-
ships in the Boeing School of Aero-
nautics, disclosed the prevalence of
negligence among college students,
it was brought out in an interview
with Prof. Felix W. Pawlowski, Gug-
genheim professor of aeronautics at
the department of aeronautical
engineering.
Professor Pawlowski, a member of
the national committee of awards,
participated in the judging of the
contest, and revealed the fact that
of the 350 papers entered, 301 were

discarded because participants 1
failed to live up to specified rul
"Many of them failed in sc
minor detail," he declared, "sucl
using the wrong size of paper, sir
spacing instead of double spaci
failure to mention age, and pI
of birth. Many failed to keep wit
the 2,000 word limit, and to att
a photograph and the statem
from the secretary of the coll
ascertaining their standing in
up )per third of their class. Th
werealso many late papers.
"Only 49 men submitted pa:
correctly. The judges were strict
ruling th~e others out, for men 'v
would overlook details in sueh
contest would be inclined to ov
look details in airplanes,

TOKIO, May 12.-(P)-Two hun-
dred miners at the Takao coal
mine in Fukuoka Prefecture have
locked themselves in a pit, refusing
to work. Their strike is in sympa-
thy with the walkout of 800.work-
ers in a nearby mine' who are de-
manding higher wages.
The Takao miners have remained
far underground since May 8, their
wives having taken them food and
bedding.
Meanwhile Tokio's chimney sitter,
Hiroshi Chiba, 19, who perched
himself on a smokestack at a dye
works 12 days ago in support of
hunger strikers among the com-
pany's workers, was. in a precarious
position after being drenched by
20 hours of rain.
Police climbed the chimney today
and found Chiba almost uncon-
scious. They planned to bring him
down tomorrow with a bamboo bas-
ket, a rope and a block and tackle.
Chiba ascended the smokestack
with the vow that he would not
come down until the dye workers
won their hunger strike in protest
against the discharge of a fellow
workman.

111

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices

DINING

G'0-3-ft /I

Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c

. .............
ONOMEMP,

b

h I I

conflicts between assigned
tion periods should be re-
for adjustment to Prof. C.
nden, room 333, West Engi-
building.
rnor Will Select
mission on Copper

Hugh TaylOr to Speak
on Chemical Research

L
I

ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM MILL AUDITORIUM
pecaI

sca
IOENIX, Ariz., May 12.-(AP)- lysts.
George W. P. Hunt, announced Ta
y he would appoint a copper the c
f commission immediately to ton S
er "data and information to tiona
e that the copper mining in- wast
ry must be protected from Resea
ruction.' photo
RATERNITY JEWELRY

Hugh S. Taylor, prominent
ceton chemist, will lecture at
o'clock today in room 303
nistry building on "Recent Re-
hes on Methanol-Type Cata-
ylor has been the chairman of
chemical department at Prince-
;ince 1926 and was on the Na-
1 Research courail in 1919. He
the chairman of the National
arch council committee on
o-chemistry in 1925.
PARTY FAVORS

SPECIAL!!
ONE GALLON

ON

Just the thing for Picnic trips

NG
These cards are made of the finest
materials, and are offered in this

ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
JEWELUR AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcad

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CRIPPEN'S

sale at

a substantial

reduction.

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Complete Line of Everything Musical

Drug Store No. 3

U. S. laying Cards

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Unexcelled Baldwin Pianos
Victor Micro.Synchronous Radio
Victor and Brunswick Records
Music Teacher's Supplies
Popular Music

Next to

Hill Auditorium

A

.ail

111111 1 jj I '1 11,

Special 2 high grade decks

UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music

East

Phone 7515

i*
ofyour tUn versity ca-
reer if you ar,* able to
themes and theses. our
notes will be much full-
er if you take them in
shorthand. Hundreds of
Michigan students have
learned typewriting and
shorthand at Hamilton
Business College. Many
have used it to earn
money on the side or
during vacation. You
will also find it very
valuable in your career
after graduation.
Typewriting
Shorthand

16
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1 '3 ,- I~

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