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May 09, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

.... .. .. . tea,
EL'" VAM RWAvA

1M m r zs ':

MISS M'CRMICK
NMES WOME I
FRS HMENPA GANT
Program for Lantern Night Will
Include Dances Portraying
History of Music.
TO BE HELD MAY 26
Divide Dancers in Seven Groups
to Represent Stages in
Development of Art.
Names of the women taking part
in the Freshman Pageant to be giv-
en: on May 26 were announced to-
day by Miss Ethel A. McCormick,
who is business advisor to the pag-
eant committee.
In the Primitive Group are: Elea-
nor Hopper, Grace Mayer, Ruth
Kurtz, Lydia Seymour, Ruth Duh-
me, Sarah King, Charlotte John-
son, Dorothy Loebrich, Mary Spauld-
ing, Evelyn Nesbit, Dorothy Ann
Williams, Jane Fauvre, Jeanette
Detwiler, Margaret Lewis, Jean Ec-
kert, Ethel Schreneser, and Lucille
Eberle.
The Greek Priestesses are: Elinor
Allen, Betty Balsey, Dorothy Batch-
elor, Beatrice Collins, Mary Jane
Compton, Norma Lou Cove, Kath-
erine Davis, Ann Gallmeyer, Miriam
Hall, Winifre, Hall, Marian Hill,
Lois Halliday, ;;Selen Knight, Ole-
tha Kuhl, Agnes Kusmaul, Cato-
line Leaman;;' Isabelle McKellar,
Virginia M inris Evelyi Nesbit, Hel-
en Podolsky; Ag*nes Robinson, Cyn-
thia Root, Lucille Root, Dorothy
Shapland, Alma Wadsworth, Helen
Wagner, Jean Wrrarhiemi, Eliza-
beth Zook, Greek Athletes: Grace"
Mayer, Sarah King,.FRuth Duhme,
Lydia Seymour, Elizabeth Cooper,
Beatrice Olmstead, Pauline Brooks,
Laura Milforcq, Olive Dawes, Corrine
Fries..
Early Renaissance Group: Mara-
bel Smith, Dorothy Shapland, Bar-
bara Robinson, Mary Piper, May
Seefried, Prudence Mary Foster,
Ruth Kaser, I4arriet Clark, Helen
Wagner, Helen Knight, Ada Black-
man, Gertrude Rush, Martha Little-
ton, Lucille Eberle, Alma Wads-
worth, Lois ^Holliday, Beatrice Col-
lins, Betty Balsley, Cynthia Root,
Helen Clark, Jeanne Hewitt, Caro-
line Mosher, Dorothy Ann Williams.
Gavotte Group: Marabel Smith,
D rothy Shapland, .Betty Balsley,
Beatrice Collins, Laura Milford,
May Seefried, Christine Alfsen, Eli-
nor Allen, Edith Davis, Frances
Butler, Claire Glowacki, E v e 1y n
Kemp, Marion Foley, Bernice Bew-
or, Carrie Garlon, Frances Foster,
Laura Heaton, Dolores Powell, Rosie
Volk, Jeanette Olson, Berenice
Cooper, Frances Cooper, Olga Swan-
son, Mary Jane Compton, Agnes
Robinson, Dorothy Batchelor, Doro-
thy Ann Williams, Sylvia Silver-
man, Miriam Hall.
Ballet Group: Josephine Wood-
hams, Mary Jean White, Dorothea
Hunt, Eleanor Thoman, Margaret
Cole, Sylvia Silverman, Genevieve
Field, and Evelyn Kemp.
Waltz Group: Helen Podolsky,
May Seefried, Marian Giddings,
Jean Engard, Claire Glowacki, Dor-
othea Hunt, Eleanor Thoman, Fran-
ces Cole, Barbara Andrews, Norma
Lou Cove, Evelyn Kemp, Esther
Kouchnerkavich, Grace Prentiss,
Helen Clark, Jean Porter, Dora
Eliasohn, Prudence Mary Foster.
Golliwog: Katherine J a c k s o n,
Charlotte Johnson, Grace Mayer,
Harriet Jennings, Phyllis Swift,
Margaret Cole, and Sarah King.

Scarf dance: Grace Prentiss, Es-
ther Kouchnerkavich, Ruth Kurtz,
Barbara Andrews, Abbie Morley,
Dorothy tLoebrich, Lillian Dietrich,
Josephine Woodhams, Evelyn Nes-
bit, Mary Spaulding, Dorothea Hunt,
Eleanor Thoman, Lotta Stern.
Modernistic Group: Katherine

DAUGHTERS PLAN1
ENTERTAINMENTS
Dormitory Groups Sponsor Teas
at Dinner Parties.
Social functions planned in the
dormitories this week center for the
most part about the observance of
Mother's Day. The week-end as it
is planned at Helen Newberry's to
begin with entertainment at the
League luncheon this afternoon.
Tonight the daughters will enter-
tain their guest mothers at a spe-
cial dinner at the dormitory when
a speciality dance will be given by
students residents, in a take off on
the Floradora girls. Following din-
ner the guests will attend the
Gould lecture or the play presented
by the Comedy club.
Sunday morning the house is
planning a special breakfast for
the mothers who will be given cor-
sage favors.
To Hold Senior Supper.
In the coming week Helen New-
berry is planning her annual Sen-
ior supper which will be held
Tuesday night following Swingout.
A special dinner will be held with
a program of speeches and the in-
stallation of officers for the coming
,year. Frances Jennings, '31, this
year's president of the house, will
act as the toastmistress.
Two traditional events will take
place that evening. One of the
members of the dormitory will be
awarded the Newberry oilcan, and
,following dinner the seniors will
plant an ivy plant at the side of
the house.
Also Honor Mothers.
Betsy Barbour also entertains at
a mother's week-end and 18 guests
are expected to attend. The enter-
tainments planned are to include
attendance at the League lunch-
eon, an informal tea .at the dormi-
tory later this afternoon. Tomor-
'row morning the residents will
serve a special breakfast when cor-
sages will be given to the mothers.
Martha Cook falls in line with
similiar plans for the entertain-
ment of the visiting mothers. The
residents will give a bridge tea this
.afternoon. In the evening the
guests are to attend either the
Gould lecture or the Comedy club
play. And Sunday morning another
play. And Sunday morning anoth-
er special breakfast is planned
with corsages, roses and tapers. In
the afternoon Audrey Haver, '32, is
planning a musicale for the enter-
tainment of guests and residents.
Outside of the activities planned
in connection with the Mother's
day functions, Jordan's social cal-
:endar included an event, given in
honor of Mosher hall residents.
The residents of Jordan hall en-
tertained those df Mosher, Wednes-
day evening from 10:30 to 11:30.
There was dancing for the entire
group. The ,music was furnished
by Esther LaRowe, '32Ed, and
Leona Butler, '34
Jackson, Ada Blackman, Ruth Cohn,'
Jeanette Detwiler, Lillian Dietrich,
Jean Eckert, Jane Fauvre, Margaret
Hewitt, Virginia Holden, Harriet
Jennings, Margaret Johnson, Sarah
.King, Jacqueline Navian, Eileen
Pawlicki, Grace Prentiss, Viva Ri-
chardson, Lydia Seymour, Lotta
Stern, Phyllis Swift, Carlotta Weit-
brecht, Elaine Schlesinger, Mar-
garet Cole.
O CKETS & R ERVA1!' SEE
K U BLER TRAVEL BUftAU
601 -.*URON 5. ANN AR R IC. TLPO t 641
X50 O AL 1 URAN= CiNG

IAI, TO HOL
TOOR PRTI

Will Give Canoe
All Women;

Trip Today;
Students

Invited.
Women students interested in
canoeing are invited to attend the
canoe supper trip to be held this
afternoon by the Women's Athletic
Association. The group will meet,
at 2:30 o'clock at Saunder's Canoe
livery, and will return around 8:301
o'clock tonight. Arrangements to
join the party can be made byl
signing the lists on the bulletin
boards in Barbour gymnasium and
the Women's Athletic building, or
by calling Audrey Callandar, '33,
at 6845.k
Each guest will bring her own
supper, and the canoes will be rent-
ed by the committee from Saund-
ers.
This party will replace the na-
ture hike fdrmerly planned for to-
day, as the tenth ou door party in
a series scheduled for the school
year. :The remaining parties plan-
ned for the spring season will in-
clude an over-night hike to the
forestry cabin on May 16, another
canoe supper trip on May 23, and
a canoe contest on May 30.
These outdoor parties afford in-
active members of W.A.A. an op-
portunity to become acquainted
with the organization, and to earn
the five W.A.A. points necessary to
membership. Twenty-five points
are awarded for attendence at five
parties, and 50 points for attend-
ence at ten, in addition to the one
point awarded for each mile hiked
on an outdoor party.
COLGATE UNIVERSITY --Dean.
Thurbert of Colgate recently un-
folded a plan of comprehensive ex-
aminations to be installed here. At
the end of his senior year the stu-
dent will undergo a thorough test
in the subject that has been his
major. He must pass 'it, or unless
he has been a very good student
his diploma wilt be with-held.
.STOP IN AT

SAw " H O G N N U A L _F U N C T IO N .
Mother's Day Bridge to Be Held
in Grand Rapids Room of
League Building.
It has become traditional for wo-
men students to entertain their
mothers at the Wyvern bridge tea
which is given annually as part of
the Mother's Day entertainment.
This year the party, which will,
be held from 2:30 to 5:00 this after-
noon, will be in the Grand Rapids
room of the League building. And
although it is given primarily in
honor of the mothers, any woman
is welcome to attend whether her
mother is here or not.
This is one of the few functions,
at which the junior members of the
organization have the opportunity
to join with the newly-elected
sophomore members in acting as
hostesses. Besides several numbers
given by the Glee Club, there will
be acts from "Came the Dawn."
Dean Nicholson's Talk
Postponed Indefinitely
Miss Marjorie Nicolson, '14, Dean
of Smith College, who was to have
lectured yesterday afternoon on
"Science and Poetic Imagination,"
was detained by a train accident
in Buffalo, New York, and the lec-
ture has been indefinitely post-
poned, according to an announce-
ment made by the office of the
Dean of Women yesterday. Dean
Nicolson was to have delivered one
of the non-resident lectures which
are sponsored each year by this
office.
I..

Weekly Plays, Shakespeare Unit,
Camp Festival Included
in Program.
"Provisions have been made to
satisfy a wide range of dramatic
abilities and recreational interests
at the summer dramatic camp at
Charlevoix this year," stated Prof.
Earl Fleischman, founder and di-
rector of the project. "There will bel
training for advanced amateurs but
uno previous dramatic experience is
required as a prerequisite for ad-
mission to the camp. The residents
of the camp will be chiefly over 18
years of age, but there will be a
number of high school students al-
so, the activities of each of which
will be organized separately."
There will be weekly productions
of modern plays in the Little Thea-
ter and four plays have been sched-
uled for the Bay View Chatauqua
company. Performances of the "In-
timate Strangers," by Booth Tark-
ington and "Taming of the Shrew"
are to be given for the benefit of
the Shakespeare camp fund. The
Shakespeare camp is to serve as a
selection and training agency for
those seeking entrance to the Na-
tional Shakespeare Memorial Com-
petition for amateurs this side in
1932 and for the First National
Shakespeare Memorial Competition
which is to be conducted as a spe-
cial feature of the 1933 World's
Fair in Chicago," continued Mr.
Fleischman.
Visitors Invited to Festival.
"To celebrate the launching of
the National Shakespeare Mernorial
Camp in 1932, we will hold a Camp
Festival on the last four days of
camp, Aug. 20-23, which is expect-
Any One
Can Afford

ed to attract several ti.
tors, including friends
A gala outdoor ,,o, rn
"Midsummer NI;Lh's P

ure hunts, a water J, ng 0 Mumme
dancing, and a varie~ 1 :pmeie, Helen Ha
have been planned for h p, Ann Vei
tainment of the oerta Minter,
Chambers of Comme r jo "iv': A ~i r -ewavr,'4
City, CharlPvoixand it oI
co-operate by ar angung p e 1 aO ;iimi program
delegations on differend.l and i cude
the Pere Marquette rail o preident.
run special excursion r w will b ins
Chicago and Detroit. The V ui t which
ter dock will also eabe y 21 i th Leag
parties to cruise to Cn' y oicers wil
occasion," he added. u at the ban
"Emphasis will be dom Polk, '31, p
combining work and play h a m , '3, vice p
most interesting way p Me. '33, secreta
in providing a deli a non, '33, treasurer.
in lovely surrounc .rawxurst will
the routine of regulr y
Its ,

FLEISCHMAN ANNOUNCES FEATURES
OF DRAMATIC CAMP THIS SUMMER

Mwmnt, to Honor
New, Past Officers
A nnual Banquet

()hie ~s wh wil ctu

zring the
ctcd at
ers. They
wxhurst,
rnor, '33;
'32; and
Besides
cers, the
manager
d1 in the
talled at
i will be
ue build-
l also be
duet and
resident;
resident;
ry; and,

act

Scde

*2

Spring1-
Regular $167
Valu
Styles as you i
the like beforef
sports, afternoo,
evening wear! You I
certainly want one or two of
thes Make you c o
before the bes arl

-7 77" N E N'S

are al the rage!
And we are in step
with the new style
Craze .. .
T ' sty e pictured above may
aawd a ite or natural

I;

the finest in .. .

Cut Flowers

and

Corsages

f l

MOTHERS' DAY

BURR
PAT TERSON'S

MAY 10

a
Merrick Heirloom
Handmade
Chinese Rugs
These Days
Silver Is Down!
That means Chinese silver
money is cheap, and you
can get an exquisite rug now
at a price anyone can afford,
New Shipments
Just Arrived
Thirty seven parcels of small-
er sizes and two big cases of
large rugs.
Come and see them
MRS. HR ,ERRICK
928 Church Street

ar~ hade
chage

free

Mayhe iiied

A>

5Aj

,r ,.

I

.9

'1 cbson
w'a

SPRING
Jewelry
Sale

._ ..'Sec-on IF ! :%'

m11

LUNDGREN,
FLORIST
208 South 4th Ave.
Dial 22105

__._ M

Huge Savings
On Fine
Fraternity Jewelry!
603 Church Street
urItee

III

1111

I

i

Mada'-'L P^

III

Comfortable Hats
for
.All-Around We ar

May
Festival

Your

fit,,,"-
}$ .
,
'? _
I ' ,t
/ i
' i 1
f
, _ . r ,
:,
I
"
f i
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:

11

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.,
, ; ,,
t., y
' . ; ,e, ,-

-1

ON

Mother y

S

Everything
New'
An Entire New
Stock of
Summer
DRESSES
$5-$10-$15
HATS
$1.95-$2.95-$5
at
the Newly Opened

Mother should
look her best.
The Day will be more of a
success for e v e r y o n e if
Mother looks her best .
in a new hat from Jacobson's.
We have stocked for this
occasion a large number of
appropriate a nd attractive
models. the latest and
best millinery styles . . . the
most wanted colors. Mother
should look her best tomor-
row.

Hill Auditorium, May 13, 14, 13,
16.
Tickets (6 concerts) $6.00, $7.0U,
$8.00.
FIRST CONCERT, Lily Pons, So.
prano; Chicago Symphony Or.
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Wednesday Evening.
SECOND CONCERT, "St. Francis
of Assissi" by Pierne. Kilda Burke,
Soprano;Eleanor Reynolds, Contral.
to; Frederick Jagel, Tenor; Nel-
son Eddy, Baritone; Fred Patton,
Bass; The Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra; The JnivErsity Choral
Union, Earl V. Moore, Conductor,
Thursday Evening.
THIRD CONCERT, "Old Johnny
Appleseed'' by Gaul. Hilda Burke,
Soprano; Eleanor Reynolds, Con-
tralto; Palmer Christian, Organ-
ist, Orchestral accompaniment;
Children's Festival Chorus; Eric
Delamarter and Juva Higbee,
Conductors, Friday afternoon.
FOURTH CONCERT, Ignace
Jan Paderewski, Pianist; Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, Frederick
Stock, Conductor, Friday Evening.
FIFTH CONCERT, Ruth Breton,
Violinist; Chicago Symphony Or.
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Saturday afternoon.
SIXTH CONCERT, "Boris Go-
dunof" in English by Mussorgsky.

"Sof tie"
$3.95 and $4.95
The perfect gadabout hat
for active and p a s s i v e
s p o r t s. Stitched flannel,
with a becoming brim, con-
trasting ribbon and a pert
feather. All colors.

3 E

The Turban, $5

These soft turbans of woven
straw carry out the vogue
for white with . . . white
and black, white and brown
and white and navy.

Require S"ecialAttention
In additou to s±rin ; ;(m;, our expert dc&ansing
will revAve ah shimmmer ung . y and nflatterin
softness they hid when ne
REMODELING J REPAIRING
Let us estimA e the os o iang necessary repairs
or remodeling your furs to accord with the advance
style notes. Very sp cc ow rates are effective
now. Phone $507 and i be called for.
FUR SCARFS AND JACQUETTES!
Come in and see 0uL i eton. The at-
tractive prices wil surprise you.

liL

i
: y

Panama, $5.95

This is the sort of wearable,
comfortable hat you can.
wear about the campus and
always look superbly smart.
Genuine panama with pa.
tent or ribbon bands.

Pinehurst Hats Exclusively

I

K 7 k T + ry p + p
A.

III

III

iii iii

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