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May 06, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1931

ed every morning except Monday dur-
JUiversity year by the Board in Control
nt Publications.
r of Western Conference Editorial Asso'
sociated Press is exclusively entitled to
for republication of all news dispatches
to it or not otherwise credited in this
d the local news published herein.
d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michi-
second class matter. Special rate of
granted by Third Assistant P'ostmraster
iption by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
s: Ann Arbor ress Building, Maynard
'hones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FRANK E. COOPER, City Editor
litor ...............Gurney Williams
1Director............ .Walter W. Wilds
City Editor........ Harold O. Warren
Editor ..............Joseph A. Russell
sEditor .............. lary L. Behinyer
Drama, Book..........Win. 1. Gorman
leflec.tions ..........Bertram 3.:Askwith
t News Editor.......harles t. Sprowi
h Editor............George A. Stauter
litor ..................Win. E. Pyper
NIGHT EDITORS
yConger CharlesR. 'prowi
Forsythe Rticha4l L. Tobinr
SNichol harold 0. Warren
Reinder
Sports Assistants
C. Fullerton .J. Cullen Kennedy
Charles A. Sanford,
REPORTERS
M. Cooley Robert L. Pierce
Frank Richard Racine
t. ilbreth Karl Siffert
edberg Jrry E. Rosenthal
Goodman George A. Stauter
Helper John W. Thomas
ones John S. Townsend
J. Meyers

faculty which would contemplate
such a move as his suggestion and
the rarity of this commodity in
a typical academic group; further,
he is again laying his finger upon
a situation prevalent at Michigan.
One need contemplate only the ex-
periences of ex-President L i t t 1 e
with his faculties to realize the na-
ture ( and t r u t h of the charge
against them. A later and more
outstanding example of this fac-
ulty attitude is exemplified in the
case of former Dean Cabot of the
Medical school. His ouster last
s p r i n g was unquestionably due
chiefly to friction between an em-
phatic and frank "hot-head" and
the prevailing group of old maids.
Outspoken liberalism or insurgency
'among faculty, even in isolated
cases, is anathema to the academic
mind; they may be regarded as
colorfully or picturesquely futile,
but they are not tolerated..
Trained under the mantle of this
conservatism, it is little wonder
that liberal student opinion is viti-
ated. An attitude of laissez-faire,
of enervation results. This armed
neutrality betwen the n o r m a 1
springs, of student insurgency and
the crystallized conservatism of the
faculty possessing the mortmain is
sorry and sterile soil for nurturing
the liberal spirit. Whether this is
cause for melancholy, or for mere-
ly indicating the passing of the
fruits of leadership from the hands
of the colleges to other agencies
lies with the decision of the next
decade.

OA S EDE
. SPRING
HERE,!
SPORTS PAGE NIFTIES have
been on the increase lately to an
extent which merits some notice in
this department. As a matter of
fact, if they keep on as they have
been doing, we shall take under
serious consideration the project of
letting them take this column over
entirely.' The competition is getting
a bit stiff for our constitutions and
besides we don't think we're veryr
funny anyway.c
* * * d
The latest of a long series
turned up yesterday in the
form of a headline over Rogers
Hornsby's picture which said: t
LEADS CARDS TO WINl
OVER CHICAGO CUBS
* * *S

Dembitz
tdman
[meyer
Grimes
7y.
Magee
anchester

Mary McCall
Cile Miller
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
'. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Business Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON, Assistant Manager
Department Managers
Avertisng.........Chale T. Kline
Artiing...... .Thomas M. Davis
dvertising.......William W. Warboys
S~ervice....... .....Norris J. Johnson
Publication............Robert W. Williamson
irculation.........Marvin S. Kobacker
ccount ............... ..Thomas S. Muir
Business- Secretary...........Mary J. Kenan
Assistants
Harry R. Beglev A Noe1D. T ner
Vernon Bishop Don. W. L qon
William Brown William Morgan
Robert Callahan Richard stratemeier
william W. Davis Keith Tyler
'Miles Hoisington, Richard H. Hiller
Erie Kightlinger Byron C. Vedder
Ann W. Verner Sylvia Miller
Marian Atran Helen Olsen
Helen Bailey Mildred Postal
Josephine Convisser Marjorie Rough
Maxine Fishgrund Mary E. Watts
Dorothy LeMire Johanpa.Wiese
DorothyLaylin
WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1931
Night Editor CHARLES R. SPROWL
THE PASSING OF STUDENT
LIBERALISM
Writing in the current number
of the New Republic under the
heading "A Dirge for College Lib-
eralism," a Yale senior takes occa-
sion to demarcate and lament the
passing of "whatever connota-
tions of radicalism and insurgency
(which) may have accompanied the
phrase 'younger generation' ten
years ago." He calls to witness the
disappearance of student and col-
lege interest in politics,. "the ex-
pression of young and untrained
opinion as a foil to the dogma of
vested interest." The conservatism
of dress, the acquiescence of under-
graduate temper. In fine, there
is "something awkwardly
sc- osand unbending pervading
the social air as well as the sartor-
ial system. . . A certain staleness,
a brackish odor, hovers over blos-
soiming manhood."
While these views are offered
'with a condition of the East's Big
Three directly in mind, the pecu-
liarity of Michigan's situation, geo-
graphically and culturally, makes
them pertinent to this campus a
jwell. Michigan always has been the
scene of counter-forces in under-
graduate traditions and attitudes-
here a natural community of view
with Eastern colleges is in flux with
the provincialism and unsophisti-
cation of the Middle West. Because
each tendency tempers the other
the only characteristic which may
be called well-formed among stu-
dents is a growing individualism, a
more self-aggressive attitude in
individual affairs.
Nevertheless, the dearth of liber-
alism, even enlightenment, in par-
ticular sectors of the campus and
among certain groups where one
would expect these qualities makes
it easy to add our lament at its
absence, or passing, to that of the
writer above.
This fear of innovation or any
sort of insurgency has thus far
begged solution. Even the New Re-
public's writer admits a loss to sug-
gest a remedy. He states, however,
that "In default of undergraduate
leaders or independent curiosity, it
should be the duty of the university
heads themselves to introduce pro-
vncntive and eontroversial lectur-

Editorial Comment
^ ^

Honestly, fellows, somretimes we
get to wondering about the Sportst
Page. Perhaps we shouldn't, though.1
CONTRIBUTOR,
Dear Uncle Dan:
This is too late for Contributor's
Emphasis Week for the good reason
that it occurred about three months
too late.
At the Baseball game Friday aft-
ernoon, several of the 4 H Boys sat
behind us. One of them was heard
to remark, "I'd like to see some of
the regular Michigan team play."
His companion remarked that
that was what they were watching,
only to be met with the crushing
retort:-"No, I mean the big Mich-
igan team . . . Babe Ruth and the
,rest of them.'
Can't something be done about
the ignorance ofrthe masses?
Very Sincerely ..'.. .
A Freshman
No, Freshman, nothing can
or should be done about the ig-
norance of the masses. If Hoi
Polloi w'ee educated, just where
would be the fun in belonging
to the intelligenzia?
WHO IS LITTLE YVONNE FA-
GAN?
* * *

MUSIC AND DRAM
RAYMOND MORIN
A Review
PRlOGRAM
sonate lathetique...........Beethoven
Shr.zo i nB nor...............Chopin
Slarelie Punoe*..................hopi
soierz~o in 15 l~t M inor......... Copini
laso~ hl Ui5Oi i II ....... ......Gersiw iii
I 'as~tv el...... ......ut ter J1ohn so
Suggest i on ija 1ui. .........Irokoieff
La ( ahled rate nglontie..........lDeussy
- iunse [hiuel~e de Fel........... eala
la Phis Q ue t e ~i..............lXebussy
1.a Campanella ............piini-iszt
Opening with a miserab:y ectic
reading of the Pathetique and pro-
needing through a program that
didn't much mitigate the opinions
of him formed on that reading to
a 'sloppy La Campanella, Raymond
Morin last night nearly negated all
the hopes this particular reviewer
had persisted in having for him.
Spasmodic moments (in which he
s e e m e d completely bewildered)
have been characteristic of his pre-
vious recitals. But at previous reci-
tals these moments semed to me
to be due to a preoccupation with
the rhythmical possibilities of a
score and to the nervous tension
induced by such attention to the
most stirring aspect of music. Last
night, however, the more frequent-
ly appearing spasmodic moments
had no such palliating impulse as
their cause. (And it seems prob-
able that they didn't have before
either). Last night, the rhythmi-
cal preoccupation reduced itself to
a concern with speciously rhythm-
ical "effects." Throughout the first
and third movements of the Sonata
Mr. Morin was emphasizing that
brilliance which a sharp, staccato
precision of chordal attack can
give. Passages where this type of
effect was possible were forcibly
thing before or after. In the inter-
ims between these passages Mr.
Worin was more or less indiffer-
ent. Characterising them was a
consistent insensitiveness to details
of phrasing, some entirely arbit-
rary shifting of tempi, and any-
where in the dynamic range a hard
unresonant tone. But perhaps most
discouraging was the attempted
tempo in the Rondo. Very obviously,
Mr. Morin was incompetent to do
justice to any of the pianistic de-
tail in the movement at such speed.
Either he didn't know this (which
is incredible) or he was taking that
speed for effect (which is discour-.
aging).
The two Chopin Scherzos were
played rathier better: perhaps be-
cause Chopin's Byronic attitudes
and musings (the coherence of
which only seldom appears, in a
Rachmanninoff performance for
example) permit the indulgence of
certain aspects of a physical talent
in the sense that even the worst of
Beethoven's piano music never
would. The Marche Funebre was
played well. In the "Rhapsody in
Blue," Mr. Morin was very casual,
seemingly not at all concerned
with either making it lucid or be-
I ing sensitive to its very consider-
ible lyricism or to its rhythms. The
DeFalla and Prokofieff numbers-
more or less written for the parti-

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FRATERNITY JEWELRY PARTY FAVORS
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UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
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of Tickets for

POOH-BAH

(From the Daily Princetonian)
The 'inside dope' on the athletic
policies of Yale, Harvard and
Princeton is given by John R. Tunis
in an article, "Pooh-bahs of Sport,"
which appears in the May issue of
The Forum. A Pooh-bah, incident-
ally, is an athletic director. "College
athletics," says Mr. Tunis, "are am-
ateur athletics, they are supposed-
ly the finest example we have of

SINGLE CONCERTS

NOW ON18

AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC OFFICE
CONSISTING OF ALL REMAINING TICKETS AS
FOLLOWS:

amateur sportsmanship, and they
are-or should be-jan inspiration
to everyone who loves games for
their own sake." On the basis of
this correct principle, he finds
much to criticize in the present
status of intercollegiate s p o r t:
principally the extent of the con-
trol exercised by the athletic direc-
tors, the three gentlemen in office
at Yale, Harvard and Princeton
serving as cases in point.
Thes, athletic directors, we are
told, are intelligent sportsmen
whose feelings are in line with the
best conceptions of sportsmanship.
Nevertheless, they have their "jobs"
to consider, and the result is a
complicated underground diploma-
cy in jockeying for schedules and
gate-receipt slices, that is only
oaralleled by governmental foreign
offices. Often, the actual attitudes
rnd relationships of student bodies
have as little to do with intercol-
legiate hostilities and "breaks," as
'a certain murder down in Sara-
jevo in 1914 had to do with the
"World War." The director feels that
it is part of his obligation to in-
.rease the prestige of his univer-
7ity and the funds of' his A.A. To
,his end, he abets the "emphasis
)n winning," and the general result
rs encouragement of that pro fes--
;ionalizing of college athletics
which all unite in condemning.
'Toward changing this undesira-
'e condition, Mr. Tunis urges the
Transfer of control to the students
:hemselves, leaving only a sort of
'bursar" to handle routine details
f business. At first glance, this
roposal appearstexcellent -cer-
tainly, the amateur should play
.ow and with whom he chooses.
3ut further consideration proves it
.itterly impractical. In the first
:lace, control would necessarily be
lelegated to a small number of
'nen. In loyalty and in the desire
:or a creditable record, they would
>e equally eager to advance the
inances and reputation of their
Ilma mater. At the same time, to
Jo this inoffensively they would
ack the ability, judgment and tact
,hat only experience can give. The
affect would hardly be to lessen the
Ilistrustfulness and , sensitiveness
ilready existent between various
institutions. And in the long run,
the tendency of the curriculum-
ridden student would be to shift
more and more of the responsibili-
ties of the athletic program to his
"bursar."
Finally, it is safe to assert that
the undergraduate bodies of most

IGNORE THE MAY FESTIVAL!
NEWBERRY AUDITORIUM ...
Ah, what a memory will be there,
my friends, when we are off about
the duties and pleasures of this
great world of ours. No matter
where our paths may go in this
life, regardless of their thorny
character, though they lead us
through dump-heaps, swamps, des-
ert wastes, or the side streets of
Detroit, we will always be able to
look back with a sigh of content
to think that at least we are not
listening to lectures in that abode
of all that is evil.
* * *
WHO IS LITTLE YVONNE FA-
GAN?
Our Contributor has just written
in that he thinks that LITTLE
YVONNE FAGAN is the lady who
was seen three weeks ago thumbing
her nose at the Statue of Liberty.
This, we have little hesitation in
stating, is utterly wrong not to say
erroneous. It is even silly.
DON'T FORGET THE COAT-
LESS SHIRT MOVEMENT....
It is endorsed by such out-
standing figures about campus
as The B&G Boys, Dan Baxter,
and others, and wvhat is more,
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY won't
have anything to do with it.

MAIN FLOOR ,.. ..r... ..$2.50
FIRST BALCONY ....... $2.00
TOP BALCONY, Front.. $1.50
TOP BALCONY, Rear ... $1.00

Orders received by mail before this time will be filled in sequence in advance.

I

E

Tickets For

/

cuiar aspects of his physical talent
which get most practice-were
'again played well. The Debussy
numbers were enjoyable. The "La
Campanella" imprecise nearly al-
ways.
If Mr. Morin is at all satisfied
with his last Ann Arbor program,
then his situation would seem to be
precarious. From last night's pro-
gram (and the other two programs
in the light of it) he seems to be
prematurely a virtuoso-in the worst
sense of that word. He would seem
to need a period of study in which
his main concern be not his piano
playing but his musicianship. Sure-
ly the fact that he consented to
appear last night means that he
,needs a musical culture which can
make him an intelligent listener to
himself and possibly a rigorous
teacher to insist that he do so con-
sistenly and critically. W. J. G.

SR=LCII ceqhrts
NOW ON TSALE
$1.00-$1.50-$2.00-$2.50
AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC

DAILY POEM
Spring is here and with it
SPRING FEVER
Shoving us further down into
the hole.
Professors have been known to
get Spring Fever also
It's a fine world after ole.
I, DAN BAXTER, wish here and
now to disclaim all connection with
the insertion of the word Bassack-
wards in yesterday's Rolls Column.
It was put in by some unauthorized
foreigner without my knowledge
and despite my avowed dislike of
Burlesque-Show wise cracks. It is
not a matter of morals. It is one of
taste, and I feel worse about it
than anyone else ever could.
* * *

LIL

PONS

OPENING NIGHT
WED., MAY 13

BU KE--REYNOLDS-JAGEL

i
x
s
J

STUDENT RECITAL

One of the STUDENT SO-
CIALIST boys was busily try-
ing to work off his messy sheet
on the populace the other day,
by shouting triumphantly,
"What are You going to do when
you get through depending on
your father?" That would,
to my mind, seem to bring up
the pertinent question of what

Romine Hamilton, violin student
under Professor Wassily Besekir-
sky, with Jack Conklin, pianist, will
give the following program at the
School of Music Auditorium, Thurs-
day evening, May 7, at 8:15 o'clock.
The general public is invited. Mr.
Hamilton is a particularly talented
violin student and has given a good
account of himself in numerous re-
citals. The program which he will
do at this time is as follows:
Sarabande Bach-Schumann'
Bourree
Concerto in D Minor Wieniawski
Allegro Moderato
Romance
A La Zingara

HA MILTON EDDY-PATTON
IN "ST. FRANCIS"-THURSDAY NIGHT, MAY.15
"OLD JOHNNY APPIESEED" FRI. P. M.
BURKE-REYNOLDS"-CHRISTIAN MAY 14
I ARTIST NIGHT
FRIDAY MAY 15

RUTH- BETO'

VIOLINIST
SAT. P. M.

_ __._ -I1

IN ENGLISH
SATURDAY EVE.

i

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