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May 01, 1931 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-01

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ESTABLISHED
1890

r

EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVER SITY OF MICHIGAN

S MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XLI., No. 149

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1931

PRICE FIVE CEN

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7

Ferry G
BUYS NEW lPLANT
TO HOUSEWORK
Regents' Board Accept
Endowment From
James Baird.
SAWYER HONORED
Resignation of Ford Is
Accepted; Degrees
Are Granted.

ives

Building

for

Univers

FORMER STUDENT
KILLED IN CRASH
Lieut. Clarence M. Ellicock,
'36k, was killed iaisantly yester-
day in an airplane crash at
Lynchburg, Va., when the plane
in which he was stunting, be-
fore a crowd assembled to greet
the second Virginia air tour, de-
veloped engine trouble.,
Efficock, woo was 25 years
old, was president of the Aeron-
autical society while at the Uni-
versity, and was an instructor
in naval aviation during three
years of his attendance as an
undergraduate.
Howard Boys, -31, fraternity
brother and former roommate of
Ellicock . who is now station-
ed at the government base at
Grosse Ile, will lead a squadron
of three navy planes to St. Louis,
Saturday, to attend the funeral.

Purchase of a building to hous
University publications, by Dex-
te; M. Ferry, jr., Detroit alumnus
was announced by the Board o
Regents at their monthly meeting
yesterday. Remodeling of the
building, which is located on
MVaynard street adjacent to the
offices- of The Daily, will begin
as soon as possession is taken
about July 1.
A publishing, rather than a print-
ing organization will be housed in
the new plant, according to plans
announced by President Alexander
G. Ruthven. The University Print-
ing and binding department,. now
located in the Library, and prob-
ably the Alumni press will be trans-
ferred to the building, but the
majority of printing will be donesby
commercial prirters, it was an-
nounced.
Press Building Plans Unaffected.;
"lans for student publications,
for which a new press building is
to, be erected within a year, will
not be affected by the purchase.
Remodeling of the building is be-
ing directed by Prof. Lewis, Gram,
director of plant extension, it was
said. Offices and press and storage
rooms will be located on the first
floor, while the second floor will
contain offices ;and a library ac-
cording, to the present project. The
fscade will be completely recon-
structed.
Announcement was made by the
Regents of the acceptance from
James Baird, of the Baird construc-
tion company, of $5,000 to be used
as the initial endowment in a fund
to support scientific field work. The
endowment will be known as the
James Baird Exploration fund and
will be administered by the Univer-
sity museums.
Sawyer Honored.
In a resolution commemorating
Regent Walter H. Sawyer, who suc-
cumbed to a heart attack at Hills,
dale Tuesday afternoon, the Board
stated:
"Though his advice was sought
upon questions of every varty,
Regent Sawyer's knowledge of med-
ical science and his prominence
among the practitioners of the
state enabled him to render service
of especial value in connection with
the medical school and the Hospi-
tal.
Moses Cooperstock was appointed
by action of the Regents to an as-
(Continued on Page 3)
State Bulletinss
(By Asson aed Press)
Thursday, April 30, 1931.
PORT IUVZON1-William Jenkin-
son Willson 36, prominent Port
Huron business man, dropped dead
from heart disease in his office here
today. He was a director of the First
National Trust and Savings Bank of
this city, and was interested in a
number of other companies.
DEWITT - The Rose and Vail
Packing company's plant here was
almost totally destroyed by fire
early today. The loss was estimated
at $60.000.

f STAE MALTLEVY
PASSED By HOUSE
Governor Brucker Claims Tax
Faulty in Principle;-
Veto Probable.
LANSING, A p r i 1 30-()-The
house today passed the malt tax
bill and by Its action sent to the
desk of Governor Brucker the most
embarrasing measure for the xe-
cutive in the current s sston of
leg lature.
By an overwhelming vote of 60
to 25, the Wood malt lexy bill, pre-
yiously carried in the senate, was
whipped through 1the'house. It was
hurried' to a final vote today on
the warning of Representative Gus
T. Hartman, of Houghton, chair-
man of the ways and means com-
mittee, that delay on the measure
would. bring a serious setback in
the path of an early adjournment
of the legislature.
Possibility of a gubernatorial veto
entered strongly into the vote to-
day. Representative Hartman ask-
ed for an affirmative roll call. Af-
ter members objected, he warned
that he would demand a call of
the house to summon more votes
for the measure. He made his re-
quest, however, after the roll calll
had started and was overruled by
Speaker Fred R. Ming. Represen-
tative Hartman afterwards claim-
ed he had sufficient support in the
house for a two-thirds vote. ;
ST. LAWRENCE DAM l
PROJECTAPPOVED'l
New York, Ontario Will Discuss1
Boundary Change, Plans
for Reservoir.,
MASSENA POINT, N. Y., April 30.1
--(G')-The- St. Lawrence, in its
hurried journey to the sea, is to p
be shunted from its island-dotted}
course into an artificial lake to
provide . Ontario and New Yorkp
with more extensive and cheaper
electric facilities.E
However, before thousands of}
workmen set up their camps alongc
the tree-bordered river, and cum-r
bersome shovels commence to scoopr
out a huge power lake, the Cana-
dian province, the American state,7
a n d their national governmentsr
must agree to a boundary change
and mutually approve constructionI
plans.a
New York has approved harness-
ing the river below the Interna-
tional rapids north of Massena, N.
Y., and west of Cornwall, Ont., and
has agreed to a project that calls
for an expenditure of $203,000,000.
One hundred and seventy-one mil-
lions dollars is to go into the hyd-

LOWE RUASES
TO OPENES
AT IVER TODA'w
Tugs-of-War to Comprise Day':
Activities; Bands Will
Lead Parade.
CANOE RACES DROPPED
Freshmen, Sophomores to Mak
Final Bid for Supremacy
in Annual Event.
Renewing the battle for under
class supremacy, freshmen and
sophomores of all schools and col-
leges of the University will gather
this afternoon at the Huron river
for the first day's activities of the
annual spring games.
Classes to be Dismissed.
Led by their respective bands, the
two classes will parade to the scene
of battle.
Freshmen wiii assemble proipt-
ly at 3 o'clock on the steps of the
Union, while their rivals will meet
at Waterman gymnasium. Classe
in the University will be dismissed
at 3 o'clock for those participating
in the traditional underclass strug-
gle.
To Hold Three Contests.
Revenge for the beating suffered
at the hands of the sophomores
last fall, will be uppermost in the
minds of the freshmen today. At
the sanfe time the class of 1933 wvill
be battling to extend its wlnning
streak and wind up its participa-
tion in underclass cornpetition with
t pefect iecord of four victories
in the class games.
Three tugs o war are scheduled'
(Continued on Page 3)
HONRR SOIETYa
ADMITS RESHMEN.
Phi Eta Sigma Has Ceremonies,
Banquet at Union; Makes
Sadler Member.
Fifty-nine students were initiat-
ed into Phi Eta Sigma, freshman
honorary scholastic s o i e t y, at
ceremonies held Wednesday night
at the Union.
The new members of the organ-
ization are: Donald E. Adams, Don-
ald C. Anderson, Maurice E. Bates,
Frederick W. Batten, Joseph A.
Bennett, Robert E. Blackwell, Clar-
ence F Blanding, Frederick K.
Broun, Robert C. Carr, Ralph R.
Cooper, James C. Cristy, Charles
E. DeBaker, E a r 1 H. Fellhauer,
Leonard H. Fellows, Jacob Follmer,
Herbert N. Gardner, Seul B. Gus-
berg, Lester M. Harrison, Dale T.
H a r r o u n, Auguste C. Hershey,
Joseph Hoffman, Ward D. Houtz.
Frederick L. Johnson, John C.
Kerper, Milton C. Kloetzel, Eugene
R. Kuhne, Henry J. Lange, Frank-
in H. LaRowe, Harold R. Legatsk,
John D. Lindsay, Richard L. Lis-
kow, Chapin M. Lowell, Kenneth K.
Luce, Clair M. Marshall,Robert W.
Merritt, Leonard Mervis, Saul L.
Nadler, Russell A. Pelton, John W.
Pritchard, Kenneth G. Roe, Charles:
A. Rogers, E,dwa r d Sourborn
Rudolph S c ha e fer, Harold R.
Schmidt, Eugene C. Schum, Den-
nie G. Shepherd, Julius S. Silver-
man, Stanley W. Smith, Robert J.
Spiegel, Ellis H. Stefferson, John
Taras, Arend Vyn, Jacob J. Weiss-
man, Virgil H. Wells, Edward J.
Wendrowitz, Richard H. Wilcox,
Virgil C. William, Gilbert J. Ward,
and Richard O. Zerbe.

Dean Herbert C. Sadler of the
engineering school was initiated as
an honorary member of the group
Communists Arouse
Riot in Wall Street

WIL RECOGNIZE
HONORSTUOENTS'
President Angell of Yale Will
Speak Before Convocation
in Hill "Auditorium.
SEATS TO BE RESERVED
Board of Regents, Faculty Will
Sit on Stage; Classes
to be Excused.

- Men and women who have dis-
J tinguished themselves scholastical-
ly in the University will be accord-
ed recognition today at the annual
Honors Convocation to be held at
11 o'clock in Hill auditorium. Di
James Rowland Angell, '90, presi-
dent of Yale university, will address
the gathering.
Classes throughout the Univer-
sity, with the exception of clinics
will be dismissed at 10:30 o'clock
this morning for the exercises.
Seats on the main floor of the
auditorium will be reserved for the
honor students, who are to be ad-
mitted on presentation of their in-
vitations. Members of the Board of
Regents and of the University fac-
ultise will- be seated on the stage.
They will assemble in the dressing
rooms at the rear. Academic cos-
tumes are to be xvorn, although
there will be no procession.
Public Is Inved.4
The doors of the auditorium will
be opened at 10:30 o'clock. Reser-
vations are being made only for
convocation guests, but the general
public is invited. Attendance at
the gathering is included in . the
program for the' Michigan School-
masters club, which is meeting here
I this week.
President Alexander Grant Ruth-
ven will preside at the exercises.
Those included in the group of
honor students are seniors who
have attained at least a "B" aver-
age and hold rank in the highest'
10 percent of the senior classes;
freshmen and sophomores who hold
averages:,of at least half "A" and
half "B," winners of fellowships
and scholarships; and recipients of
the numerous special scholarship
awards.
Angell Is Michigan Graduate.
The speaker for the exercises, Dr.
Angell, is a graduate of the Uni-
versity, having obtained his degree
in 1890 and a master of arts degree,
in 1891. He was accorded the de-
gree of doctor of philosophy at the
universities of Berlin, Rensaeller
Polytechnic, and Halle in 1893. He
was made doctor of literature in
1915 by Vermont university and re-
ceived the degree of doctor of laws
from Cincinnati university in 1920.
He held positions at the University
of Chicago as head of the psychol-
ogy department, dean of senior col-
leges, and dean of faculties from
1905 until he was named president
of Yale university in 1921. He is
particularly known for his effective
leadership in university govern-
ment.
WINOT9 NNOUNCES
YEAR 1S5 LAST PLAY

GOOD PITCHING BEATS
COLGATE IN OPENER, 4-2
Harley McNeil's pitching com-
bined with the accurate fielding
and powerful slugging of his
teammates to give the Wolver-
ines a 4 -2 victory overa strong
Colgate n in e yesterday after-
noon. McNeil allowed the in-
vaders but five hits, while Cap-
tain Tompkins' home run and
several long hits by Hudson and
Superkd drove t h e Wolverine
markers across the plate.
Colgate remains here today for
the second and final game of the
series.
STATE-S -- EB-AT
TO, MEET TONIGHT
High School Teams Will Argue
Chain Store Question in
Hill Auditorium.

TO. ACT AT

ONCE

Hope to Have Plan in
Operation by May
For Eletion.
Overwhelmingly favoring the
proposed revision of student gov-
ernment, the student body by a 10
to 1 vote yesterday approved the
-plan which will centralize student.
government in the Senate Corn-
mittee on Student Affairs.
More than 1,170 students, of all
schools and colleges of the Uni-
versity, as compared with the 1,-
100 who balloted in the Student
council elections last spring, ex=
pressed opinions on the most vital
change ever proposed for student
government. The vote was 1,086
for and 88 against the proposal.
As the result of the vote, the
Student council at its next meet-
ing will draw up a petition on the

Student Council Will
Petition Senate
as Result.

ity Press'
DEBATE MANAGER
TO RESIGN POST
9

OVERWHELMING 10 TO01 VOTE
INDICATES CAMNPUS OPINION;
TOTAL OF 111174 BALLOTS CAST

Prof. G. E. Densmore,
Manager of the Michigan 'High
School Debate league, who will con-
clude, his long period of service
with the organization, when he in-
troduces Dean John R. Effinger, of
the literary college, tonight. Dean
E Effinger will serve as chairman of
the state championship debate be-
tween Grand Rapids Union and
Detroit St. Anthony High schools.
I -
CLUBMEETS' HE
University Officials Speak Before"
SMenhbers at First General
Conference Sesison.
With every indication of a record-,
breaking attendance, the Michigan;
Schoolmasters' club officially open-
ed its sixty-sixth annuai meeting
at 2 o'clock yestcrdays afternoon,
with a business meeting in the Uni-
versity High School auditorium.
The first general conference of
the present session was held imme-
diately after the business meeting,
on high school and college rela-
tions, at which representatives of
both types of institutions presented
their views on the question.
"Some high school teachers lose
sight of the broader ideals of edu-
cation and teach merely the sub-
ject matter," said Vice President
Clarence S. Yoakum, speaking on
pre-college progress and college
grades. Experience, he asserted,
must be recognized as a means of
mental growth, and teachers must
realize that high school is a sort
of apprenticeship for college.
"What Principals of Secondary
Schools Wish Taught in Michigan
High Schools," was the subject of
Prof. George E. Carrothers, of the
education school. He pointed out
the increased demand for increased
instruction in special English fields,
and said that there is a place for
more courses in debating, dramat-
ics, and public speaking.
Wray H. Congdon, University of
Michigan high school inspector,
discussed the adaption of the high
school curriculum to the needs of
the community. Various leaders
discussed the conference problem
I from different points of view.
Officials of the club announced
yesterday that, although no record
had yet been compiled, early regis-
tration showed that many organi-
zations were sending representas-
tives to the meeting for the first
time, and that the total number of
delegates present would be more
than 3,000.
The keynote of the 1931 meeting'
is "What should be stricken from
the secondary school curriculum of
(Continued on Page 3)

propos
More than 2,000 high school pu- jcrnmen
pils and teachers will come to Ann versity
Arbor today for the fourteenth an- The'Se:
nual state championship debate, to 'make tl
be" held' by the Michigan High organiz
School Debating league, at 7:45 operati
o'clock tonight, in Hill auditorium. .' P
Grand Rapids Union High School It is
will take the affirmative side of the'con side
question, "Resolved: that' national May 11
chain stores operating in the state proved,
of Michigan are detrimental to the spring'
people of .the state." Detroit St. 20 and
Anthony High school will take the fall
negative side of the issue.
Richard Braun, Robert Lindberg, Polli
and Jack Livingston will represent more tl
Grand Rapids Union, while Milton ballots.
Elef~t, Edwin Avery, and Evelyn most pc
Barth' will be the delegates from 30 ot
Detroit St. Anthony. 300 vo1
Dean John R. Effinger, of the diagon
literary college will be the chair- Altho
man of the debate. He will be in- dents w
troduced by Prof. George E. Dens- of the
more, of the speech department, the mo
mantiger of the debating league. project
Y .vote.
ALTO PThe
favorin
ineffect
ernmen
9Tnml g Y0 1 campus

ed revision of student gov
Lt, and submit it to the Uni-

hoped that this body will
r the proposal at its meeting
iso that the system, if ap-
may be started before the
all-campus elections, May
be in full operation by next
ng on the question was hea-
the Engineering arch, where;
;han 350 students cast their
Angell hall was the, next'
opular place, where close ;to
ed while the center of the
al received the opinions of
275 undergraduates.
ugh a large majority of stu-
were expected to be in favor
proposed revision, not even
st ardent supporters of the
anticipated such a decisive
allot Reveals Opinion.
balloting on the question,
g a change from the present
tal system of student gov-
.t, leaves little doubt as to
sentiment towards the Stu-
ouncil.
pproved by the campus yes-
the proposed revision of stu-
vernment will increase stu-
presentation on the Senate
tee of Student Affairs to
a ity with the faculty; cen-
all student,' government in
nate Committee; create a
administrative council, or-
on the merit system plan,
lace the present student
1and create a judiciary
tee, composed of an equala
of student . and faculty
rs, to decide all student'
ubject to appeal to the Uni-
Disciplinary commitee.
DELTA KAPPA
LDS INITIATION

Duckwitz to Lead Grand March;
Favors to be Miniature
Army Sabers.
More than 300 couples will dance }
to the music of Slatz Randall and
his Brunswick Recording orchestra,
at the thirteenth Military Ball,
from 9 until 2 o'clock tonight in the
ballroom of the Union. The music
will be broadcast over Station WJR.
The Grand March, which will be-
gin at 11 o'clock, will be led by
William Duckwitz, '31E, general
'chairman, and his partner, Miss
Janet Wood of Chicago. An arch
of sabres will be formed by _mom-
bers of Scabbard and Blade, hon-
orary military society and sponsors
of the ball, under which the Grand
March will pass.
Miniature sabres, exact replicas
of those of the United States army,
will be distributed as favors. The
words, University of Michigan Mil-
itary Ball," will be engraved on
each blade.
Further Earthquakes
Felt in Soviet Russia
MOSCOW, April 30.-(IP)-Further
earthquakes in the Soviet republic
of Azerbaijan, in trans-Caucasia,

dent co
As al
terday,
dent go
dent re
Commit
an equ
tralize
the Se
student
ganized
to rep'
council
commit
number
membe
cases, s
versity
PHl
HO

Good Hope' by Heijermans,
Open at Laboratory
Theatre Tonight.

to

"Good Hope," a four-act play by
Herman Heijermans, will be pre-
sented at 8:30 o'clock 'tonight by
students of Play Production cours-
es. The production will also be
staged tomorrow, Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday in the
Laboratory theatre, according to
Valentine B. Windt, director.
The cast is headed by Eugenie
I Chanel. '32. Edward Fitzgerald, '32.

Alexander Outlines Methods of
Education at Banquet.
Dr. Thomas Alexander of Mis-'
souri Teachers' college, authority
on the training of educators, ad-
dressed the initiation banquet of
Omega chapter of Phi Delta Kappa,
national honorary educational fra-
ternity, last night at the Union.
He talked in place of. Dr. James
R. Angell, president of Yale univer-
sity,' the scheduled speaker, who
was delayed in reaching Ann Arbor

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