100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 25, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, !1PIiI , 25, 1031

THE MICHIGAN

IA ILY

PAGE FIVE

SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 19,31 PAGE FIVE

I I I

,-I
s&

"9

MMUA'wA ME Q

zPt r ,
f
:.%V "

4 b .m+a.. n. <.

= -~ -- -. ,

---- - ..r---------°-

BUSINESS MEETING
TERMINATES FiFTH
I.LA.S. PROGRAM

Four Standing Committees
Report in Morning and
Afternoon Sessions.

to

BANQUET TO BE HELD
Mrs. Frederick Fisher Speaks on
Relation of American and
Oriental Cultures.
Reports -from the four standing
committees of the fifth bi-ennial
convention of the Intercollegiate
Association of Women Students,
which has been meeting in Ann
Arbor since Wednesday, will con-
stitute the main business in the
final assemblies, which take place
today.
The committees, which will re-
port in the morning session, and
continue in the afternoon session,
if their reports are not completed,
are the committeeson resolutions,
~constitution, nominations, and rec-
ommendations.
This morning, the Pan-Hellenic
asociation entertained the dele-
gates at a breakfast in the Women's
Field house. A formal banquet to-
night will officially close the con-
vention.- However, a trip to Michi-
gan State College at East Lansing
has been planned for Sunday morn-
ing for a number of delegates who
are remaining an extra day.
Mrs. F. B. Fisher Speaks.
Mrs. Frederick B. Fisher, of Ann
. Arbor who has spent many years
in the Orient, spoke to the dele-
gates yesterday morning on the
subject of Oriental culture in rela-
tion to American culture, and both
in connection with World Peace.
In visualizing a possible peace
table, Mrs. Fisher said that she
thinks the Japanese women will be
the hostesses, the Chinese will be
the managers, the Indian women
will lead in the meditations and
reading, while the American women
will be the general organizers, be-
hind the scenes.
Mrs. Fisher also said that she
believed that in the possibility of
another war, she would like to see
the women go into the trenches.
Miss Ethel McCormick Talks.
In the afternoon, Miss Ethel Mc-
Cormick, assistant professor of
physical education and Social Direc-
tor in the office of the Dean of
Women, spoke on Orientation Week,
and about her work as a Social
Director.
Following the general assembly,
discussion groups were conducted
on international relations, voca-
*tional guidance, athletics, student-
faculty relations, and I. A. W. S.
and the individual woman. Miss
Margaret Elliot, associate professor
of economics, and associate profes-
sor of personal management ad-
,dressed the group discussing voca-
tional guidance.
The Women's Athletic association
entertained the delegates at a
luncheon in the Women's Field
house, and a formal dance in the
evening finished the activities of
the day.
Frances Beuthien Asks
Women to Join Riders
'Women interested in riding are
invited to join the group which will.
ride at 9 o'clock tomorrow morn-
ing atnthe Fairgrounds, according
-to Frances Beuthien, '32, riding
manager of the Women's Athletic
Association.
Those riding are asked to meet
in the lobby of the League building
at 8:45. Transportation to the Fair-,
grounds will be furnished.
Riding classes will be held at 7:30
o'clock next Tuesday and Thursday,
and those who wish to join them
are asked to sign their names on
the bulletin board in Barbour gym-]
nasium. These rides are sponsored
by W. A. A. Instruction is offered
to those who wish it.

SORORITIES HOLD
SPRING PARTIES M
Dinners for Faculty and Alumni, M E
A ls o R u s h e e s ,_ A r e F e a tu r e d . A S S O C IOEe i eU-m r oP L A N S
Entertainments Thr members of
the faculty seem to be popular with
many sororities for the spring sea-
son, while others make parties for To Start From Athletic Building
alumni and rushees the center of at Two O'clock for Five
their social interest. Mile Tramp.
Last Thursday night Collegiate
Sorosis gave a formal dinner in ALL CORDIALLY INVITED
honor of several members of the --
faculty. Prof. Philip Bursley and W.A.A. Points for Membership
Mrs. Bursley, Prof. Benjamin D. Offered New and Inactive
Meritt and Mrs. Meritt, Prof. Paul Members Who Attend.
Cuncannon, and Prof. Joseph H.
Drake were the guests. Tomorrow All women students are invited to
rakwerthesororitysTomorwbe guests of the Women's Athletic
afternoon the sorority is giving a Association at a hike to take place
tea for faculty members, for which at 2 o'clock this afternoon. The
approximately 200 invitations have group will meet at the Women's
been. extended. Mrs. Peter Van Athletic building, and will follow a
Boven, Mrs. Robert Angell, Mrs. route of approximately five miles
Griffith Havs, Mrs. T. L. Purdom, along the river.
and Mrs. Herbert Sadler are to The hike has been planned to
pour. Bowls of spring flowers placed last two hours, and the guests will
around the rooms and on the table return to the Athletic building later
will be used as decorations for the for refreshments.
affair. To Open Spring Program.
During the spring vacation, fif- This will be the first outdoor
teen alumnae of Alpha Chi Omega party on an extensive spring pro-
held a week-end house party at gram which has been planned by
the chapter house. Last Wednesday Audrey Callandar, '33, the outdoor
night members of Alpha Chi Omega manager of W. A. A. Other parties
were hostesses at dinner to eight which have been scheduled for the
rushees. remainder of the semester include
Betty Healy, '32Ed, delegate from a canoe supper trip to be held on
the local chapter of Alpha Phi to May 2, a nature hike to take place
the district convention, and several on May 9, and an over-night hike
other members of the sorority are to the forestry cabin on May 16.
in Chicago this week-end for the On May 23 another canoe supper
convention meetings. trip will be held, and the group will
be concluded on May 30 with a
SEcanoe contest. "These parties will.
all be held on Saturday afternoon,
a e a and up to the present time they
E have been exceedingly well-attend-
ed," Miss Callandar stated. The
party today will be the seventh out-
door party to be given by W. A. A.
this year.
Seventy-five New Members Have Planned for New Members.
Joined Since Last Week These parties have been especial-
of March. ly planned for new members who
_fMc_ wish to become better acquainted
Seventy-five new members have with the organization, and for in-
joined the Women's Athletic Asso- hefive W..bers whpowints requiit
ciation since the inauguration of for membership. One point will be
the spring membership drive, stated awarded for each mile hiked on
Gladys Schroder, '33, chairman of an outdoor party, and in addition
Ghememyrs hipodmm33, airmanf25 points 6re given for attendance
the membership committee yester- at five parties and 50 points for
day. attendance at ten.
The membership drive began Plans are being completed for the
during the last week of March, and formation of an outdoor club which
will be devoted exclusively to out-
will continue thrrugh the next two door activities. The members will
weeks. "The Women's Athletic As- be chosen from those who have at-
sociation has my hearty good wish-I tended W. A. A. outdoor parties
es in its membership drive," stated most regularly, and who show a
sufficient interest in that type of
Miss Alice C. Lloyd, dean of women activity.
"It is an organization which offers Assisting Miss Callandar in mak-
a great advantage to Michigan wo- ing arrangements for the party to-
men and which should have the day are Jean Botsford, '33, Claa
support of every woman on the Grace Peck, '33, Gladys SchrrG. er,
campus." '33, Dorothea Waterman, '3, and
The membership committee will Anna Neberle, '33.
be in the W. A. A. office on the
main floor of the League building WEST VIRGINIA-Women stu-
between the hours of 2:30 and 4 dents at the University of West
o'clock every afternoon next week, Virginia spend their spare time do-
to answer questions concerning ing social service work. The various
membership in the organization, organizations sponsor Home Econ-
and to record the five W. A. A. omics courses for girls who would
points and collect the dues requisite otherwise be unable to get instruc-
for membership. This committee, tion in this kind of work.
which is composed of Gladys Schro-
der, '33, Beatrice Olmstead, '33,
Corrine Fries, '34, Josephine Fisher,
'32, Lydia Seymour, '34, Frances
Manchester, '34, Eleanor Allen, '34,
and Elizabeth Cooper, '34Ed., has
been appointed to assist Dorothy N o~
Ellsworth, '32, treasurer of W. A. A.
All women registered in the Uni-
versity are inactive members of
W. A. A., and may become activeS m a

by paying the membership dues of
one dollar, Membership in the as-T han
sociation offers opportunities for
leadership and healthful recreation
through the traditions it sponsors,
such as the Penny Carnival, Lan-
tern Night, and Freshman Play
Day, and through its more strictly
social activities such as the ban-
quets, spreads, and parties.
A chart explaining the W. A. A.
point zystem and awards is printed
in the "M" book, a' copy of which
may be obtained at the W. A. A.
office.

D
terc
Stu
the
exh
Sbei
on
bui
IT
sys
scr
den
wor
tior
uni
ven
T
dis
file
the
loth
* con
* lici
tior
ical
pai
riot;
the
exp
wor
'tior
rie
off(
wh
car
wor
'are
wac

d.R E T'~T AT 1WON PE RIa m waa f
IA.W.S. Delegates (UKIt4IVIAl I PRIOD TOUDLGAT
Is Held at League Social Director of Women Says when she told about the 34 organ-
Students Meet Professors I izations on campus.
uring the convention of the In- and Each Other. At the beginning of the school
collegiate Association of Women-- men, thought that the league hous-
dents, which is being held, at "Orientation period is a time es should have some attention. Miss
League building this week, an when we attempt to bring every' McCormick has so organized them
iibit by and for the delegates is new student into sympathetic rela- now that they are in groups which
rg held in the Committee room 1 have the same interests. "They are
the second floor of the League tions with the members of the fac- gued s as torhav ny pr-
lding. ulty," said Miss Ethel McCormick,'nredso asitoavan h s
'here are the yearbooks, point assistant professor of physical edu- "And the tea dances that were given
tems, constitutions, regulations, cation for women and Social Direc- in the League building were the re-
apbooks, and sundry other evi- tor in the office of the Dean of Wo- suit," she added.
ices of the activities of the "oee tdnsta r o
men's self-governing organiza- men, to the delegates of the Inter- "However students that are not
ns of the various colleges and collegiate Association of Women uld not be poutsidedbuactivitis
iversities represented at the con- Students.p
"Students with similar interests Holt said yesterday, "S t u d e n t s
ition. areboht togther. Thainest should learn to meet people," shei
'he University of Kansas has on dents are put in small groups at the continued.
play a unique cabinet in which is head of which is a member of the Through her office Miss McCor-
d printed matter representing faculty and two student advisors. mick is attempting to give that "in-
various activities of the wo en. To be a student advisor is a great dividual touch" which will cause
air schools possess scrap-books honor. It is really the student as- ( the students to have a personal in-
taining clippings of all the pub- sistants that make Orientation terest in the activities that are go-
ty received by the local associa- Week a success," she declared. ing on around them. "It is the out='
ns. .Miss McCormick described Orien- standing women who give the 'tone'
Many organizations sponsor mus- tation Week to the delegates. She to the rest of the campus," she
1 programs, speeches, and cam- also told them about the Women's said.
gns, and are displaying the va- League and the Women's Athletic "An education is something -that
ir ways inwichtPhe gi association- will give you resources that you
ir events publicity. Pamphlets "We want to get every girl into may use at any time and habits
meainig te- orkndont bysthea- the activity in which she is inter- that will improve you," she conclud-
nen's self-government associa- ested. We want to develop more ed.
ns are also onddisplay, in a va- leaders and avoid duplication of
Sof rm and olors. . s events, Miss McCormick stated NURSES SCHEDULE
'articular bit of local color is__________________
ered by the University of Oregon,
ich is exhibiting pictures of the Junior A.A.U.W. Group SPRING ACTIVITIES
mp which is available - to theI Will Elect New OfficersCi
men students there. All women
allowed to go to the camp on Series and Tennis Tourney.
ok-enls whe rc, thev can take As the last occasion at which this

I

Exhibit by and for

- MISS ETHEL M'COR

HICK DESCRIBES

Gl IBT IN WEST OF STATE
Norma Crane Hunt Directs Wo-
men in Numerous Recital
Programs.
Yesterday thirty-three women of
the University Girls' Glee club gave
three concerts in Grand Rapids. At
noon they sang for the Kiwanis
club whose guests they were for
luncheon. In the afternoon a pro-
gram was presented at the Daven-
port-McClaughin Business College
and last night the glee club gave
a concert in the First Methodist
church of Grand Rapids.
Miss Nora Crane Hunt directed
the glee club and Miss Thelma
Newell, violinist, was a soloist on
the programs. Included on the pro-
gram were "Italian Street Song," by
Victor Herbert, "Die Almacht," by
Schubert, several Kloche numbers
and Michigan college songs.
This afternoon members of the
glee club will sing at the Wyvern
bridge party, and tomorrow they
will present a program for a Moth-
er's Day affair.
OBERLIN COLLEGE-One of two
new dormitories at Oberlin will be
for married students. It will be
equipped with "kitchenette suites
and all modern conveniences," an

announcement says.

w e tfl1LtkAi, MV AA i y U
advantage of the facilities offered
to them. The camp is situated in
the woods, and can accommodate
. twenty women.
The exhibition will be open all
day today, and any one who wishes
may go through the numerous and
varied offerings representative of
the work being done by co-educa-
tional colleges and universities in
all parts of the country.
SWIMMING STARS
TO MEET M. S. C.
Victors in Interclass Tourney
to Represent University.
University of Michigan women
have been invited by Michigan
State College at Lansing to com-
pete in a swimming meet, on Play
Day, which will be held on Saturday
afternoon, May 2, announced Tere-
sa Romani, '33, swimming manager
of the Women's Athletic association.
The meet is being sponsored by
s "Green Splash," an honorary swim-
ming club at Michigan State.
: The women who made the best
times in the interclass-intramural
- swimming meet held before vaca-
tion will be selected to represent
the University. The names of these
students and the complete schedule
of events will be announced later.
COLUMBIA-The Bulletin, Semi-
weekly publication of Barnard Col-
lege, has been absorbed by the
Spectator, Columbia's daily paper.
s Financial exigencies made the move
imperative if Barnard was to have
any news medium. A special sec-
tion will be devoted to news of in-
'terest to the college women.
'a

year's officers will officiate,, the
Junior branch of the American As-
sociation of University Women will
hold a dinner meeting at six o'clock
Wednesday at Palmer Field House.
All women wanting reservations
should communicate with Mrs.
George Alder at 4731.
There will be no program at this
meeting as it will be given over to
the election of officers. The nom-
inating committee, consisting of,
Isabelle Nichols, Eleanor Brown
Waltz, and Miriam Schlatterback,
will suggest two nominations for
each office and other nominations
Imay be made from the floor.

Planning a season of spring sports
activities, Couzens Hall will begin a
tennis tournament Monday. It will
be a singles match and the class
champions will be determined first.
Then the class winners will play
each other to select the champion
for the whole School of Nursing.
A series of baseball games be-
tween two teams picked from those
who have shown their interest in
the sport will also start next week,
and the Sunday morning breakfast
hikes will continue. Two of these
. have been held already.

I
t
r
r
f
F
I
J I,
:,
U I,
'',,
] ', ,.
? i
i
' ,,,..

has returned from Madison, having successfully staged the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin's Annual Opera, "It's a Gay Life," and
announces that classes have been resumed at his studio at 919
Oakland Avenue.
NBeVfero re
Such RyFemarkable
FUR VALUES?*
You will be amazed by these Fine P'ur

School of
Concerts
(No Admission Charge)
THELMA NEWELL, Violinist,
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist, Fac-
ulty concert, Sunday, April 26,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
KATE KEITH FIELD, soprano,
in Senior Recital, assisted by
T h e lmia Newell, violinist and
Louise Nelson, pianist, Tuesday
afternoon, April 28, 4:15, Men-
delssohn Theatre.
BETTY SUTHERLAND, pianist,
Student's Recital, Thursday, April
30, 8:15, School of Music Audi-
torium.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Faculty Concert, Wassily Besekir-
sky, Violinist, Hanns Pick, Violon.
cellis, Joseph Brin man, Pianist,
Sunday, May 3, 4:15, Mendels8
sohn Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, Pianist,
Student's Recital, Tuesday, May S,
8:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, James
Hamilton's class will present
scenes from. "Aida," Wednesday,
May 6, 8:15, Sciool of Music
Auditorium.
STUDENTS' RECTAL, Students
of Nora Crane Hunt, Voice,
Thursday, May 7, 8:15, School of
Music Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist,
in Organ Recital every Wednes-
day, 4:15, Hill Auditorium unless
otherwise announced.
t
May
Festival
Hill Auditorium, May 13, 14,15,
16.
Tickets (6 concerts) $6.00, $7.00,
$8.00.
FIRST CONCERT, Lily Pons, So-
prano; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Wednesday Evening.
SECOND CONCERT, "St. Francis
of Assissi" by Pierne. Hilda Burke,
Soprano;EleanorReynolds, Contral-
to; Frederick Jagel, Tenor; Nel-
son Eddy, Baritone; Fred Patton,
Bass; The Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra; The University Choral
Union, Earl V. Moore, Conductor,
Thursday Evening.
THIRD CONCERT, "Old Johnny
Appleseed" by Gaul. Hilda Burke,
Soprano; Eleanor Reynolds, Con-
tralto; Palmer Christian, Organ-
ist, Orchestral accompaniment;
Children's Festival Chorus; Eric
Delamarter and Juva Higbee,
Conductors, Friday afternoon.
FOURTH CONCERT, Ignace
Jan Paderewski, Pianist; Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, Frederick
Stock, Conductor, Friday Evening.
FIFTH CONCERT, Ruth Breton,
Violinist; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor. Saturday afternoon.

Al
f
fi
I
1 ;
'
I
1i
it
i,+

ioe yes
rter
the
Pump
U, -

ii
i

Coats,
Priced.

Scarfs

A year from nows... yes, many

and Jacquettes so Low-

years from now you'll be glad you bought
during this sale. A small deposit will

reserve

your selection-Insured,

Free.

storage
- 4t

.._-

iI

MlichignLau
1eauty Parlor
RENDERS
SERVICE SECOND TO NONE
Make Reservations
U'd Tba n X A T n I YT"eT' T i t n

Blck, and While Java Lizard
Black Patent Leather
Natural Linen
Blue Kid
The opera pump is the shoe for
every costume and every occasion -
for street, for afternoon and evening.
Mezzanine

PREPARE and PREVENT
rather than
REPAIR and REPENT
Every year the moth does over a billion dollars worth
of damage. And remember, the moth is only one of
the destroyers of furs. Our vault is your protection.
A Step Ahead of The Vogue
Review our advance styles for the coming season,
and let us remodel your old fur coat into a swagger new
garment, at low summer rate.

I

I

I

11111

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan