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April 25, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

MICHICAN

DAILY

" SATU1RDAY, AP~L 25, 1.931 -,

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..

PRESIDENT HOOVER AWARDS TROPHY
FOR PROGRESS N AVIATION IN 1930
aax
aa
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Associated Press Photo '
As part of a ceremony in which President Hoover presented the
Collier trophy to Harold Pitcairn, Philadelphia, for outstanding develop-
ment in American aviation in 1930, James G. Ray (left) landed an auto-
giro on the White ;House lawn. The president is shown in the insert
awarding the trophy.
ENGINEERS' PROFESSION UNAFFECTED,
BY DEPRESSION, PIT TSBURGHER SAYSI

TCON\EP{S SECRETARY WILBUR SIGNS CON T RJACT
| | L L ,FOR CONSTRUCTION OF HOOVER7OAM
FOR VRoSY BAND
Extensive Program on Calendar "

TAKEN BY R ICE
Quarterly Report of .Dr. Sink
Reveals Increase of 6884

i

rt'IbfiSs pring, sponsor !
Annouinces.

An extensive spring program"has
been mapped out for the Varsity
band, Robert A. Campbell, treasur-
er of the Univesity and sponsor of
the band, announced yesterday.
Numerous concerts,as well as ap-
pearances at baseball games and
track meets, are listed on the sched-
ule.
On May 1, the organization will

Calls Over Last Year.
The mental hygiene department
of the Health Service has definitte-
ly established -itself as an import-
ant factor in the life and welfare
of ,all university students. Accord-
ng to the quarterly report issue by
Dr. Emory W. Sink, 'more than
2,500 cases have been handled by
t his departnient this quarter. This
partially accounts for the increase
of 6,884 calls in all iepai'tments of

4
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declared that "it is a mistake for
average young men to take posi-
tions with big companies, such as
General Electric and Westinghouse,
immediately after their graduation
from a university." He maintained
that after a year or more, their
time is wasted in comparatively
small positions, and their college
courses are of minor importance,
unless they are in position for ad-
vancement to the top of the com-
pany.
"Get a job in a small outfit, to
obtain general experience," he ad-
vised, "and don't specialize in your
first few years out of school."
He also suggested that the grad-
uate move from one position to an-
other in his first years in the pro-
fession, before settling down to a
life work in one establishment,
' where he hopes for future promin-
ence.
"True, the engineering profes-
sion seems somewhat underpaid,
especially to the young graduate,'
he explained. Nevertheless, the cap-
able men can advance to formid-
able positions, he concluded.

appear tor a snort pro iiram at the
state championship high school de-
bate contest in H111 auditorium and
on the next evening the last radio
broadcast of the year will be given
over the University radio hookup.I
A concert on May 4 in Detroit wills
mark the next concert for the band.
This concert will be held in Orches-
tra hall as one of the regular ser-
ies on the Detroit Musical society's
spring concerts. The next day, the
band will play for the Michigan- Associated Press Photo
Illinois baseball game.
That week-end, the band will Secretary Ray Lyman Wilbur of the Interior department, at Wash-
have one of the busiest times it has ington, signed the contract with Six Companies, Inc., for construction.
experienced in the last few years. of Hoover dam on the Colorado river. Standing are W. R. Bechel (left),
On May 7, it will play for an R.O. vice-president of Six Companies, a combination of construction organ-
T.C. revue and on the next night izations, and Edward J. Harding, managing director of the companies.
an appearance will be made at the _ _ __ _
traditional Cap night ceremonies.
On May 9, the outfit will journey to
Benton Harbor for the annualPhiRadi Program s
lead. That evening it will give a (Eastern Standard Time) .
concert in the park there. A con- _ _
cert in conjunction with the Men's
and Girl's Glee clubs' on Sunday, The Drake relay games will be emphasis on his latest play, "Dyna-
May 10, in Hill auditorium for theboemo."
Spring Homecoming visitors will broadcast over WJR, from es - mk.
end the week. Moines, Iowa, at 4:30 oclock this 2:30---Penn Reinv rnival--W XYZ,wA' ll
On May 20, the spring campus afternoon. (until 5::0)
I4:30-Drake Relay~ WJR, WI,, WTANI,
c o n c e rts w ill b e g in a n d w ill c o n - - -----th e -ire ctio ny .--wale r w , w Tz,
tinue each Wednesday night until Under the direction of Walter 6:0--Ted lniing' Spo'slants ofP enn Relay
the end of the semester. Plans are Damrosch, the General Electric - w-BC
alr d 16:30 --mis ftn4""(r--Ww
already under way, also, to send symphony orchestra will broadcast Latrier or lht'tr0--[1CO
the band to Indianapolis on May I tefrtprorac fanwsini'lh Ballew and his (ihosi rr --WV.J'/
30, Memorial day, for the interna- the first performance of a new Paul Tremaine's or<estra--wlmlu'
tional auto races there, suite, "The Song of Hiawatha," by 6:45-Lowell 'honas--WL, N1C)IVA, WVz
The band will end its seasonwth Braine, at 9 o'clock tonight over an 7:00-lotnl'owy and ltrnsiloiNn.b:,1
its regular Commencement week NBC-WEAF network. Floyd Gibbons 7:05-Gene Austin--Iew. w1NImt
program during which it gives sev- will discuss "Adventures in Science' 7:15-Arimanid V'w.v'S lil canon ii orehelra
eral appearances both on the cam- on the same program. s W o\- ,
7:30---Ted Lewis-( lu, Vaspa r- -WTAM, . WWJ
pus and at the regular ceremonies. -- - US0 Weer-ano fiels- Wpr<ram W. itt
Ted Lewis and his orchestra will !:00-weber aieds- , WTtI
Driver Loses Folder present several of the blues num- iS:15--w Conra; welome Lewis on ..i-
bers for which he is famous when s:30 -ram-XVW;l, -1.MI
Containing $93 Cash he is heard at 7:30 o'clock tonight I 9:OO-Walter Damrosch direct in eneral
over WWJ and an NBC-WEAF net- 'l y
Paul Cannehl, 1211 Elder boule- work. The program includes "Fare- 10:00 -Cuckoo, lurlilwJl zW ,
vard, a driver for Greene's clean- well Blues," "St. Louis Blues," and 'woAtUN, WaY
ers, reported to police yesterday "Dinah." flank Simmoirs' flo at, "I1adv And
that he had lost $106, $93 of which 11:--
? i T :0- a uir ewsem bl>ie-iVWJZ C
was in cash. Cannehl told police, Prof. Harlow O. Whittemore, of-N vI eh (rnrrl1es
p , , 11:15--Henry Busse's lit l ~' (rkeJ Oiches-
who have as yet been unable to re- the landscape design department; tra-WWA. WtY
cover the money, that it was in a Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the Eng- YLmAIIC hIS ROy muU
bank folder at the time of its loss. lish department in the engineering 11:45-LItitlt dack Lit e-NVXJ, n''TAM
12:0=-Phil Slsitalny-KYXV
college; and Prof. Paul Mueschke, Hal Kemp-WTAM, WlILAP
of the English department, will Bert Lown and ilt"ore orehesra-
speak during the University broad- 12:30-1,.onu ico's ochestra--W Z
EE cast at 7:30 o'clock tonight. Pro- 1"00-(. ntone "allroojm- 31t
fessor Mueschke will discuss "Eu-
gene O'Neill, the Dramatist," with Donald Douglas Does

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the Health Service for the first
three months of this year over 1930.
Although Mental Hygiene work,
first started only a year ago, thii
departmenta-l phase is now recog-
niizecd -as an essential p it of stu-
dent health work. A special office
is being provided for this depart-
meht in the b sement .additiin to
the present clinic. This will be
ready within a few weeks.

Two deaths have occurred this
quarter, a ratio which is far below
the average death ratte for a sim-
ilarly aged non-collegiate group.
This in itself speaks highly for the
efficiency of the Health Service, not
only in administering aid to those
afflicted, but in uncovering and
thwarting impending diseases and
infections.
More than 25,000 regular dispen-
sary calls have been made this
quarter, while 144 students have
been actually confi-ned in the
Health Service for treatment. The
pharmacy department has filled
3,566 prescriptions during the first
three montths of this year, or more
than 1,000 more than were filled
in the same period last year.
King of Siam Lives
in Mansion Erected
by-One-Tine Miner
PURCHASE, N. Y., April 24.-(P)
-_King Prajadhipok of Siam, a
slight and travel-worn figure who
holds absolute power of life and
death over his 11,000,000 subjects,
has settled down to gain strength
for an operation on his eyes. He
arrived here Wednesday.
For the time he remains in the
United States, Ophir hall, the coun-
try estate of Mrs. Whitelaw Reid,
will be the official residence of the
royal party. There the king will
rest, except for a brief trip to
Washington next week, until an op-
eration to remove a cataract froin
one of his eyes is performed net
month. Several other tentative en-
gagements have been made, but
none definitely accepted.
As the residence of the king,
Ophir hall is finally fulfilling the
destiny Which its foul'der intended
for it. Ophir hall was built many
years ago by Ben Holloday, one of
the gaudiest figures ever to invade
New York from the west, and it be-
camve, fittingly enough, one of the
most pretentious country places in
'the, nation.
Born in poverty in Kentucky, Ben
Holloday migrated to Salt Lake
City when a young man and started
! a 'pony express." The express lino
failed, so Ben moved into N'eVada
and purchased the Ophir g'old mine.
It made him millions faster than he
believed possible, and when the to-
tal had reached fifteen he decided
to look over the New York of which
he had read so much.

III

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tis

V

ANN ARBOR'

NI

,, - ---- ---- -I

JUDGE G. SAMPLE
ORDERS RECOUNT

Ypsilanti Township Ballots
Last Election Affected.

of

Recount of ballots cast in the bi-
ennial election April 6 in Ypsilanti
township was ordered yesterday by
Circuit Judge George W. Sample in
a decision on the petition of John J.
Sheppard, Republican nominee for
supervisor from that township.
In announcing his decision, Judge
Sample declared that, although a
charge of fraud was made concern-
ing the wrapping of ballots, he
found the law to be "directory and
not mandatory."
"I have considered the law con-
cerning the wrapping of ballots in
separate sealed rolls, etc., in the
absence of a charge of fraud to be
directory and not mandatory,"
Judge Sample said.
Sheppard was tied by Supervisor
Edward D. Foster, sticker candidate,
both candidates polling 271 votes.
Lera Curtis to Teach
N.Y.U. Summer Sessian
Lera B. Curtis. assistant director,
of physical education, department'
of Public Instruction of Michigan
was appointed to the faculty of the
New York university Summer school,
which opens its 37th annual session
on Monday, July 6 and continues
for six weeks through Friday, Au-
gust 14.
According to an announcement
made by Milton E. Loomis, assistant
dean of the School of Education
-aI

and director of the summer session,
there will be a total of 485 courses
offered under the supervision of a
faculty totally 205.
Local Speech Contest
Will be Held Friday
Speakers from five high schools
in the state will be the guests of the
University High school in the sub-
district division of the State Ex-
tempore speaking contest, to be
held at 3 o'clock, Friday afternoon,
in the high school auditorium.
Dean James B. Edmonson, of the
School of Education will preside.
The contest will be judged by
speech teachers of the competing
schools.
One speaker will represent each
school. To the winning school will
be presented a banner in honor of
its representative.
Gilbert E. Bursley, '34, won firstl
place last year in the sub-district
contest.

0. E. Hunt
Engineer's

to Address
Conference

0. E. Hunt of Ann Arbor, one of
the foremost engineering executives
in the country, will address a meet-
ing of student engineers to be held
April 28 in the General Motors re-
search auditorium. The committee
on student activities of the Detroit
section of the Society of Automotive
engineers is sponsoring this meet-
ing, which has as its purpose bring-
ing student and junior engineers
into contact with various represent-
atives of industry, who will talk on
or demonstrate the principles of
engineering as currently applied.
There are three speakers on the
program: Hunt, vice president of
the General Motors Corporation for
engineering matters will speak on
"The Relation of the Student to
industry;" R. N. Janeway, thermo-
dynamic expert of Detroit, who will
talk about "Mathematics as an En-
gineering Tool" and D. t Webster,
experimental engineer with the
Chevrolet Motor company who will
discuss "Laboratory Equipment and
Its Uses."

Research for MuseumI
Donald Douglas, graduate fellow
from Grinnell college, Ia., now as-
sociated with the staff of the Uni-
versity museums, is stationed at
Whitefish Bay doing research work
on bird migration, it was announced
yesterday by Frederick M. Gaige,'
director of the museum of zoology.
Douglas is conducting his work
from his headquarters in a duck-
hunter's house, which he has estab-
lished as a camp. After setting bird
traps, he is investigating the species
of birds on Sanid'Point, their be-
havior, and the length of time in
which they stay in the North.

Pilo.,

MAJESTIC

NOW
PLAYING

hey
fellers!
here 1 am
in
Percy
Crosbys
Hit!!!

I

I

LAST
TIMES
* TODAY

-cL

I

-S -
I ur

The picture you can see again and
. C 111

2:00-3:40
7:00-9:00

sure"I ain't goin' t'be here
--so I got t'make it sn
love C'mon over for a hott
Pacr Cjjgar
5 SI,
Robrttoognk

e long
nappy.
time!"

utcome of the .::.:.
of the ~RICHARD ARLEN
SPOT
RD ST. tA NA4

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